It is currently October 15th, 2019, 7:31 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 55 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 1:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: June 25th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
Erhard...gender specific :lol: :lol: :lol: you took double dose of you PC pill this mornin' darlin...

Barbara,

I'm not sure you're close enough to the tweeny generation to see just how intergrated online is into their social sphere. My kid is outside more than most and I'd say 40 % of her interaction is online. Dance friends from our region, cousins and school friends do most of their organization online.

I don't think "Christian" matters in this case either......I think some of you "go off" on steriotypes there :wink:

What is facing education managers is a new and complex social interaction where the laws of this country aren't fully up to update on how to handle the "virtual" aspect.
Cyber bullying is real and has had enough of an effect to directly play a role in suicide and retalitory physicality.

Do think insisting on FB information is the way to go?
We put exteme timelines on educators to come up with policies to fix complex situation..."the do something now"

As adults here on a friendly little board we've come up against some communication problems

combine socially developing pre-teens that may be internet savy with a medium that has no accountability?
That's the education case study; it spills into their school lives and educators want to stop it.....if you don't like this solution then suggest an alternative....really, it stinks but end and means and well......Erhard can give you the big brother Orange keeper justifications :P :P :P :lol:

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2007/02/ ... ebook.html

I particulalry like this one on the duty of care, internet and the legal implications for educators:
http://www.ctf-fce.ca/e/resources/cyber ... cebook.pdf

_________________
http://campfireblues.wetpaint.com/
home of the opinionated old farts!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 3:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 27th, 2009, 5:24 pm
Posts: 10
Barbara wrote:
Quote:


Private or government-funded, no matter, my point is "so what?".

If this sort of thing bothers you, then don't sign up for Facebook, or Twitter, or any of that stuff. And don't let your kids have it. Pretty simple. At least it was, right up until they invented all this "social network" crapola.

And those freaking cellphones. :evil:



Barbara


For the record I am not a member any social networking site, nor do I own a cellphone, or a microwave for that matter. And I am certainly not surprised that all these privacy issues exist, it is not "news to me" in fact, I would be surprised if there WASN'T much more of this going on than we are being made aware of.

So let's follow your line of reasoning to another, more personal senario.

You feel that because twittering, facebooking, ect. goes on during school time, the school has the right to access all of the pupils social networking activity. And I certainly agree that activities preformed at school should be monitored accordingly.

But, both you and I know that the overwhelming majority of these kids "networking" is happening outside of school.

Now, try to imagine the massive percentage of people that have snuck in an email check, or personal call at work. I know I am guilty.

By your logic, that should give my employer access not only to my work place activity, but also to my home phone and internet histories. After all, I have the choice to work there or not. A workplace making that demand would raise MAJOR privacy concerns, with me anyway. But, rather than make said demands, there is a rule that no one is to engage in such activities at work.

The school could simply have made the same rule, punishable by suspension, detention, expellment, ect. They did not however come to that reasonable arrangement, but rather demanded access to the children's activaties in and out of school.

You should be just as offended by the demand made of the children as you would be were it to happen to you.

Should peoples employers have access to your homephone and internet activity? Yes or no?

_________________
‘All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good people do nothing'


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 3:51 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 1st, 2005, 7:15 pm
Posts: 4182
Location: The Gateway to Woodland Caribou
Just to be clear here AA, you ARE a member of THIS social networking site.

Boo!

_________________

Advice is a form of nostalgia; dispensing it is a way of wishing the past from the disposal--wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts, and recycling it for more than it's worth.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 4:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 27th, 2009, 5:24 pm
Posts: 10
Red Lake Rob wrote:
Just to be clear here AA, you ARE a member of THIS social networking site.

Boo!


LOL! you got me! got me GOOD!

I suppose I'll have to rethink my membership now. :wink:

My bad. In my defence though, I don't upload photos here, nor do I talk about what I've done, or am doing, or will do on the weekend, I don't have any personal info posted.

As for posting my politacal views here, I'm glad to have them reach as many people as possible.

_________________
‘All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good people do nothing'


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 4:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 27th, 2009, 5:24 pm
Posts: 10
Red Lake Rob wrote:
Just to be clear here AA, you ARE a member of THIS social networking site.

Boo!


LOL! you got me! got me GOOD!

I suppose I'll have to rethink my membership now. :wink:

My bad. In my defence though, I don't upload photos here, nor do I talk about what I've done, or am doing, or will do on the weekend, I don't have any personal info posted.

As for posting my politacal views here, I'm glad to have them reach as many people as possible.

_________________
‘All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good people do nothing'


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 5:06 pm 
Offline
CCR Assistant Administrator
User avatar

Joined: January 20th, 2003, 7:00 pm
Posts: 12090
Location: Simcoe County, Ontario
Adventureaddict wrote:

As for posting my politacal views here, I'm glad to have them reach as many people as possible.


If that's the reason you joined CCR, that is very annoying.

There are plenty of sites where those topics are the focus.

Or...perhaps you should start your own site or blog.

I, as a long-time member of CCR, don't feel that this is the appropriate message board for "political" discussion.



Barbara

_________________
I'm out of bed and I made it to the keyboard....what more do you want?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 5:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 27th, 2009, 5:24 pm
Posts: 10
Barbara wrote:
Adventureaddict wrote:

As for posting my politacal views here, I'm glad to have them reach as many people as possible.


If that's the reason you joined CCR, that is very annoying.

There are plenty of sites where those topics are the focus.

Or...perhaps you should start your own site or blog.

I, as a long-time member of CCR, don't feel that this is the appropriate message board for "political" discussion.



Barbara


The reason I joined ccr is because i am an avid canoer (canoist?) going on 25 years or so. However, I do enjoy sharing important current events with the people here on this site. I feel they are important enough to be discussed in the 'off topic' section. Paddlers talk current events too right? It's not just me?

Of course, you are welcome not to participate in any of my posts, or to present your opinion, just as I do mine. If you are that annoyed, I suggest you stop willingly participating in my posts.

Personally I enjoy your point of view, and what you have to bring to the table, and I hope that you will continue to exercise your free speech, express yourself, and add to my postings, just as you have been doing.

If you don't like what is on the screen, click the "back" button.
If you are truely offended, please let me know. I don't beleive I have been anything but civil.

And if you find holes in my logic regards to privacy rights ( the topic at hand ), it would be great if you could point them out, rather than politely asking me to shut-up.

-Kyle

_________________
‘All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good people do nothing'


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 6:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: June 25th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
Kyle, Kyle,
you've been a gentleman BUT
It's Barbara; it is no secret how she feels about wide dispersing ramblings on politcal topics....a hint would be to exercise humor; she had a weak spot for Strathcona and Ed's Obama dance
It's not everyones cup of tea
you'll find some who will sip willingly; others will try and ram purple *esus juice. :wink:
All part and parcel
decorum and tact...


Dam Rob, you're funny too, bye ya keep ths up and I'll have to read all your posts :wink: :P

issues with your position Kyle?
I think you were strerhcing the connections a bit,
but
here's my take
anything you put in the public rehlm is fair game...... yea, you should be nabbed by your disability admin for posting pictures of your ski vacation to Jasper on myspace or twittering about how you've bilked the "system"....

as for the school demanding access and locations of FB?
I'd be ticked if someone was being paid out of education dollars to monitor accounts....and yea, it might be across the line; I'd ask why the administration felt this step is necessary when many boards are going the policy route below:
the Ontario policy is that students who write threatening material on facebook that can be identified as directed at an idividual of particular school shall be held accountable for their actions.....it's in the second document I linked
no one is watching, it's a reporting threatening behavior by the "victim"

Even the WWW ain't a free-for-all unaccountable land.
Didn't we discuss this already Erahrd in the internet defimation thread? my mind is going.....

_________________
http://campfireblues.wetpaint.com/
home of the opinionated old farts!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 1st, 2009, 7:39 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 7513
Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
Today's Star has an article to show how quickly and easily personal information can be harvested for illegal gain on Facebook. Imagine, half an hour on the key board, and you are in a position to zing someone with a mortgage...:
Quote:
David Malamed, a forensic accountant, wanted to see how easy it was to gather personal information on Facebook.

He created a profile for someone called Michael Duarf (fraud spelled backward) and used a photo of Wentworth Miller, an actor on a TV show, Prison Break.

Within 20 minutes, five people had responded. One spotted the fake photo, but still wanted to become a friend.

He went through her profile and found her date of birth, where she lived (Mississauga) and her husband's name. Now he could find her address at Canada411.com.

Then, he checked her list of friends and found her brother. This gave him her maiden name, often used for security checks by financial institutions.

If he were a fraudster, he could apply for a new credit card in her name, maybe take out a mortgage or withdraw money from her bank account.


http://www.thestar.com/business/money91 ... ebook?bn=1

_________________
“What is the good of having a nice house without a decent planet to put it on?” - Thoreau


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 8th, 2009, 6:38 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 7513
Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
toady's Doonsbury cartoon..... :o

Image

_________________
“What is the good of having a nice house without a decent planet to put it on?” - Thoreau


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 20th, 2009, 1:49 am 
Offline
CCR Assistant Administrator
User avatar

Joined: January 20th, 2003, 7:00 pm
Posts: 12090
Location: Simcoe County, Ontario
Quote:
Depressed woman loses benefits over Facebook photos

A Quebec woman on long-term sick leave is fighting to have her benefits reinstated after her employer's insurance company cut them, she says, because of photos posted on Facebook.

Nathalie Blanchard, 29, has been on leave from her job at IBM in Bromont, Que., for the last year and a half after she was diagnosed with major depression.

The Eastern Townships woman was receiving monthly sick-leave benefits from Manulife, her insurance company, but the payments dried up this fall.

When Blanchard called Manulife, the company said that "I'm available to work, because of Facebook," she told CBC News this week.

She said her insurance agent described several pictures Blanchard posted on the popular social networking site, including ones showing her having a good time at a Chippendales bar show, at her birthday party and on a sun holiday — evidence that she is no longer depressed, Manulife said.

Blanchard said she notified Manulife that she was taking a trip, and she's shocked the company would investigate her in such a manner and interpret her photos that way.

"In the moment I'm happy, but before and after I have the same problems" as before, she said.

Blanchard said that on her doctor's advice, she tried to have fun, including nights out at her local bar with friends and short getaways to sun destinations, as a way to forget her problems.

She also doesn’t understand how Manulife accessed her photos because her Facebook profile is locked and only people she approves can look at what she posts.

Insurer confirms it uses Facebook
Her lawyer Tom Lavin said Manulife's investigation was inappropriate.

"I don't think for judging a mental state that Facebook is a very good tool," he said, adding that he has requested another psychiatric evaluation for Blanchard.

"It's not as if somebody had a broken back and there was a picture of them carrying with a load of bricks," Lavin said. "My client was diagnosed with a major depression. And there were pictures of her on Facebook, in a party or having a good time. It could be that she was just trying to escape."

Manulife wouldn't comment on Blanchard's case, but in a written statement sent to CBC News, the insurer said: "We would not deny or terminate a valid claim solely based on information published on websites such as Facebook." It confirmed that it uses the popular social networking site to investigate clients.

Insurance companies must weigh information found on such sites, said Claude Distasio, a spokeswoman for the Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association.

"We can't ignore it, wherever the source of the information is," she said. "We can't ignore it."

Blanchard estimated she’s lost thousands of dollars in benefits since Manulife changed her claim.


http://www.cbc.ca/canada/montreal/story ... efits.html

_________________
I'm out of bed and I made it to the keyboard....what more do you want?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 20th, 2009, 6:40 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 1st, 2005, 7:15 pm
Posts: 4182
Location: The Gateway to Woodland Caribou
Frequent trips to sunny destinations, party's at strip joints. I'd be depressed too at the thought of going back to work every day to actually earn the money I was getting.

Hmmmm, Next spring.....My doctor ordered me to relax for a few months on an extended canoe trip. Note to self...don't post the pictures on facebook.

_________________

Advice is a form of nostalgia; dispensing it is a way of wishing the past from the disposal--wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts, and recycling it for more than it's worth.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 22nd, 2009, 7:09 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 7513
Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
They are in the news again, with a description on how some scammers use fb to get at your details: provide links that ask you for login info. Since the request seems sincere and personal and comes through what seems to be a confidential environment - i.e. all your settings have been for maximum privacy - it's easy to fall into the trap.

Here's the Star article:
Quote:
Enemies lurk on friendly Facebook
Social networking sites fall prey to cyberbullies who steal identities
Nicole Baute Living reporter
Published On Tue Dec 22 2009


Tips to avoid getting hacked or phished:

Check with senders before following links in emails, which may lead to fake websites asking for logins and passwords for various online accounts.

Don't use proper names in passwords. "Any English-language proper-spelling name, that's an easy target," says Glen Falkiner, director of network services for IT firm Quartet Service. Make your password more complex by swapping some letters for others, or adding symbols.

Do not use the same password for all your online accounts, and change your passwords regularly.

Companies should tell employees to leave peer-to-peer file sharing and social networking at home to limit the risk of infections.

Mike Brown was late to join Facebook's swelling ranks. When he finally did, he kept his security settings high, used perfect punctuation and was careful about what he posted.

His friends couldn't believe he would post a "very, very vulgar" **** picture on his Facebook profile last April. As they suspected, he didn't.

His account had been hacked.

Users of social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook are learning they are vulnerable to online bullies, who use malicious programs to snatch identities.

Perpetrators access accounts by figuring out passwords or by "phishing" – sending links to fake websites masquerading as trusted ones, which ask for and collect login and password information.

Once into an account, these cybervillians use the online identity to ask friends for money, promote products or just cause trouble.

On Twitter, this might mean offering followers a $500 Victoria's Secret gift card or encouraging them to click on a link to get 100 followers. Even celebrities have been hit, including CNN's Rick Sanchez, Britney Spears and Barack Obama, who unknowingly asked his followers to take a survey in January and possibly win $500 in free gas.

Mark Federman, a researcher at the University of Toronto, says hackers play on the reputation individuals have among their friends and contacts. It's identity theft in the purest sense of the term.

"It's not the pseudo-identity that is our financial records. It's actual identity," he says.

Brown, a recent graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University, isn't sure how someone hacked into his Facebook, but he suspects they may have got in through his email account, which was also hacked.

When he notified Facebook that his account had been taken over, they dealt with the problem within a week.

Bryan Rutberg, 47, was the victim of a much more serious hack. He was reading a book in his Seattle home one night when his Facebook status mysteriously changed to "Bryan Rutberg IS IN URGENT NEED OF HELP!!!"

His teenage daughter was the first to spot it.

While Rutberg tried to get his account back, the hacker sent messages to his "friends," one by one as they came online, posing as Rutberg and saying he was robbed at gunpoint in London and was in desperate need of money to get home.

"Literally dozens of people I had connected with on Facebook, some of whom I had no way of connecting with other than via Facebook, friends from high school, college, grad school, old jobs, were being solicited by the person who had hacked my page trying to get money from them."

Most of Rutberg's "friends" were suspicious of the call for help, but one took the bait and wired $1,200 to the imposter. When Rutberg told the friend that he had been scammed, he responded with "a popular four-letter word."

Rutberg isn't sure how the hacker got into his account, but he suspects he might have clicked on a fake link that asked for his account information.

Facebook now has a list of frequently asked questions about money scams, phishing and fake notifications and emails, including steps to take if you're targeted.

Stephen Hockema, a professor in the faculty of information at the University of Toronto, thinks people don't realize how valuable information about social networks is to spammers.

"You can target a specific group that you know has something in common," he says. "You can actually send a message to somebody that looks as if it's coming from a friend. You're much more likely to get their attention. That's what advertisers are paying for, is attention."

Hockema says people need to take their password security seriously, even for social networking sites used primarily for pleasure.

"You have to understand that once someone gets into your Facebook account they can impersonate you, send messages to anyone in your contact list, which often includes co-workers.

"It can actually escalate pretty quickly."

_________________
“What is the good of having a nice house without a decent planet to put it on?” - Thoreau


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 22nd, 2009, 11:32 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 2nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3731
Location: Grand Haven, Michigan U.S.A.
Yeah, my Facebook account was hacked back a month ago and two messages were sent to most of my "Friends." One was reasonably crude, the other was about colon health care. As with the example, people knew it was out of character... and most Facebook users realize that hacking is part of being "on the web." Fortunately, I changed my password to something more secure and my account hasn't been used to send emails. A simple fix. I figure I'll probably need to change it every once in a while.

PK


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 28th, 2010, 3:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 7513
Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
Here's another example how facebook entries can lead to a scam that not only takes your money but also destroys you peace of mind. From today's Star. Lesson: do not allow viewers identify relations, and give no indication as to when and how long you'll be away.

Quote:
The next online scam? Virtual kidnapping, real ransom
Published On Thu Jan 28 2010



Cathal Kelly
Staff Reporter

For security experts such as Steven Domenikos, the rise of social networking has meant the arrival of a troubling new phenomenon called “virtual kidnapping.”

Here’s how it originally worked: Thieves would dial at random, trying to take advantage of surprise, and claim that “your daughter” had been kidnapped. People without daughters could see the scam right away, but in countries where actual kidnapping is endemic, thieves could often wring some money or jewellery out of desperate parents before they contacted their children.

Now these same criminals are using Facebook. They search for profiles, looking for young people bragging about an upcoming vacation. Armed with the dates and location, they target parents, hoping that their kids are out of contact for hours or days.

The crime is common in Central and South America. Domenikos, CEO of Massachusetts-based IdentityTruth, says he expects to see this newer, more sophisticated version hit North America soon.

“Bottom line: The individual consumer is on their own. There is no overseer, there is no policy, there is no governmental act that is going to help,” says Domenikos. “Unless you are very careful, you leave digital footprints everywhere.”

_________________
“What is the good of having a nice house without a decent planet to put it on?” - Thoreau


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 55 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group