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 Post subject: Question for expoy gurus
PostPosted: September 2nd, 2009, 5:59 pm 
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Does anyone know if East and West systems are compatible? One coat of east has been applied and we ran out. Can we put on a second coat of west over the east? And while this newbie is at... What do some of you recommend for treating seats, gunwhales, decks, etc.-- marine varnish, or shellac, or ? Thanks for all or any input.

Jb


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PostPosted: September 2nd, 2009, 7:09 pm 
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I have no experience with east, but i routinely put West 207 overtop of System Three clear coat. I think as long as they are both epoxy resins, you will be fine, You didn't say whay kind of west, but 207 is the preferred for fill coats because of it's clarity.

As far as varnishes, etc, i have used just about every kind with success, except for an experiment i conducted last spring. I used a water based marine varnish application...it was no good.


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PostPosted: September 2nd, 2009, 9:12 pm 
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Yes, as long as you prepare the surface of the previous coat properly (removing amine blush if present, and perhaps light sanding), epoxies will stick to one another.

Under special circumstances, some can even be mixed. West says that their 5:1 105/205 resin can be mixed with 1:1 West G-flex resin to get a compromise in flexibility. But I wouldn't try that with resins from different makers.


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PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 2:00 am 
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I agree with the others. I routinely use one brand of epoxy over another. In some cases it's mostly cured (days) and in other cases it's fully cured (months and beyond). In each case the surface is prepped with some sanding to give the epoxy some "tooth" to adhere to for a strong mechanical bond. I think you're OK over green epoxy (ie stuff that's only partly cured) of another brand as long as there is no amine blush or other issues to compromise the bond. One thing should be pointed out here just to be sure (ezwater said it but I'll say it again), don't mix hardener from one brand with that of another brand.

I used West for my kayak and I still have some on hand, I consider it my "good stuff". But I also have some older Industrial Formulations brand epoxy on hand. It's also decent, but the hardener has turned purple with time. I've been using that IF epoxy up in non-critical uses and where the colour is not seen or not obvious, including some recent kayak repairs. I've had no adhesion problems.

Cheers,
Bryan

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PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 9:36 am 
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What do some of you recommend for treating seats, gunwhales, decks, etc.-- marine varnish, or shellac, or ?


Spar varnish, or exterior varnish... both should have ultraviolet (UV) blockers to keep sunlight from breaking down the varnish resins, the wood underneath and epoxy.

The marine grade spar varnishes are more expensive generally, Interlux or Epifanes.... exterior-grade varnishes will also block UV and can be half the price of a marine varnish. Benjamin Moore's SunBar or Defthane available at Lee Valley are good exterior types... SunBar is a traditional urethane and forms fairly thick coats and might need to be thinned. Deftane is a newer polyurethane and is harder and easier to sand, but forms thin coats and more applications will be needed.

My fave right now is Defthane because it's easy to sand smooth, without clogging sandpaper too quickly. A traditional urethane (SunBar, Interlux Schooner) might be better for rawhide seats where some flex is needed.

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PostPosted: September 3rd, 2009, 6:17 pm 
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pawistik, lots of hardeners get dark and turn strange colors with time. West 205 hardener turns a wine red, and gets somewhat thicker. I have never had a problem using old hardener, as long as it is not to thick to come through the pump. Old West 105/205 actually makes a wonderful repair glue for mahogany furniture.


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