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 Post subject: Birders
PostPosted: August 21st, 2014, 6:28 pm 
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Joined: November 14th, 2013, 10:24 pm
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Location: Huntsville Ont.
A great App that has helped me identify elusive yet vocal birds that are high up in the canopy of the forest. Complex search engine by region and month, habitat, shape, size, colour,...

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/audubon-birds-pro/id333227386?mt=8

Also a great resource to have with any outing.

http://www.xeno-canto.org


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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 2nd, 2014, 7:49 pm 
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Location: Huntsville Ont.
Blue heron stalks and eats a groundhog.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nzCK7qrr4-w


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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2014, 2:25 pm 
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Joined: January 11th, 2005, 4:58 pm
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Location: Manitoba
That app is on sale for 99 cents.

Any comment about a good bird app for the far north?

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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2014, 4:47 pm 
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Location: Huntsville Ont.
I cannot see any price because I own the app but I'm sure I spent over ten dollars for the full version and not the introductory, possibly free version. It has been a while.

I think you will do well with the full version, 820 species plus rare occurrences from Europe. The Audubon field guide book(s), east and west, may be more in depth but they can't beat the lightweight app simply for bird songs alone.

Here's their site http://marketplace.audubon.org/products/national-audubon-society-field-guides

The app beats heavy books.


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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 4th, 2014, 7:30 am 
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Location: Kemble, Ontario Canada
As Birding is a passion with me and I don't like bird books of photographs. I am giving you some choices. As usual a review done much better then I can is done by another person.
Check this blog out: http://blog.nature.org/science/2013/05/ ... rt-birder/
To take your birding to another level look at: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
And http://birding.aba.org. If you are in Ontario www.ofo.ca
This should keep you out of trouble in the Tween season. Weather to crappy to Canoe and not cold enough to do winter things.
Stay safe
OAF

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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 4th, 2014, 9:48 am 
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Joined: December 29th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
Some time in September loons may begin congregating before flying south. I still have not seen a large group (eg. 50) like reported by some... here's a group of eleven seen on Lake Opeongo, APP, Sept 27, from a photo at Markus Rubino's website.

Image

http://www.markinthepark.com/triplogs/t ... day12.html




Anybody hearing white-throated sparrows singing during the fall... this has happened the last several years while canoeing rivers running through spruce and fir forests.

Cornell's website states that they will sing on their winter range so maybe this isn't unusual if they are migrating south... songs here for anybody unfamiliar.

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/whit ... row/sounds

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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 6th, 2014, 8:15 pm 
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Location: Warren, Manitoba
Question for you eager birders...

Just returned from a trip and although we saw hordes of birds, we neither saw nor heard a loon. Plenty of fish to be had so that isn't an issue. We are speaking of Eastern Manitoba, about 3 hours north of Winnipeg.

We saw, Bald Eagles, Osprey (which don't exist in Manitoba), Canadian Geese, multiple species of ducks, Whooping Cranes and Trumpeter Swans, all the same body of water in one day and yet, no Loons.

Any ideas why? We were thinking they had left already.


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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 6th, 2014, 9:49 pm 
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Location: Huntsville Ont.
Mihun09 wrote:
Question for you eager birders...

Just returned from a trip and although we saw hordes of birds, we neither saw nor heard a loon. Plenty of fish to be had so that isn't an issue. We are speaking of Eastern Manitoba, about 3 hours north of Winnipeg.

We saw, Bald Eagles, Osprey (which don't exist in Manitoba), Canadian Geese, multiple species of ducks, Whooping Cranes and Trumpeter Swans, all the same body of water in one day and yet, no Loons.

Any ideas why? We were thinking they had left already.


What a lucky sight for you. Loons typically avoid water bodies where there is a lot of motorized boat traffic. If this is not the case then they were simply elsewhere.
http://www.aitc.sk.ca/saskschools/animals/loon/lnfly.html

As for the osprey they do happen to breed in every province and territory.


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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 7th, 2014, 9:22 am 
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
Early Sept seems early for them to fly south... maybe they were starting to congregate and grouped together somewhere else.

IIRC the rest of the time loons are territorial so they should be more uniformly distributed with the chances of seeing a loon here and there being greater.

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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 7th, 2014, 1:32 pm 
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Location: Kemble, Ontario Canada
Sorry Mihun09
The Osprey does breed in Manitoba. Actually over most of the provence.
http://ebird.org/ebird/map/osprey?bmo=0 ... .0&gp=true
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osprey
Distribution and habitat[edit]
See also: Ospreys in Britain
The osprey is the second most widely distributed raptor species, after the peregrine falcon. It has a worldwide distribution and is found in temperate and tropical regions of all continents except Antarctica. In North America it breeds from Alaska and Newfoundland south to the Gulf Coast and Florida, wintering further south from the southern United States through to Argentina
Keep birding, something new every day.
Stay safe
OAF

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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 7th, 2014, 9:57 pm 
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Location: Simcoe County, Ontario
bearburrito wrote:
What a lucky sight for you. Loons typically avoid water bodies where there is a lot of motorized boat traffic. If this is not the case then they were simply elsewhere.


Um, not really. The loons on Opeongo were the least skittish that we've encountered. They didn't dive away when we passed them in our motorboat.

The times we've been in a canoe is when they stay the furthest away, and will dive into the water.

Except on Rosebary...we paddled into a large group, and they didn't move, just gave us hell.

And we've got plenty of loons on Lake Simcoe.


Barbara

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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 7th, 2014, 10:15 pm 
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Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
I'm betting they simply congregated on another lake. Though they have a long flight, early Sept is early to leave.

The ones around here leave early November. Lazy louts... they have been banded.. they fly 18 miles to the Atlantic Ocean. Because of their limited need to move around they are huge. 40 percent bigger than the average Midwest loon.

Loons here have a remarkable ability to coexist with power boaters. We live on a lake of waterski boats.. All doing 30 mph or more. The loons aren't fazed at all. They wait till the last moment to dive.

They use docks to squirrel their young under to try to keep them from becoming taco snacks for eagles. This summer I had fun watching Mom with baby. Baby was a big adolescent..trying to eat a mooring ball. Mom had this "whatever " attitude.

We don't hear them sometimes for a couple of days . There are other lakes for them to move to in the area.. ( seven within 8 miles) Then in the fall they typically have a big gang. I don't think I have seen fifty but 30 seems normal

The real threats of course are human made.. mercury and lead contamination


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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 8th, 2014, 7:58 am 
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
Some reasons why loons socialize Sept-Oct...

Quote:
The Puzzle of Loon Parties


Common Loons are not known to be congenial hosts or particularly accommodating to visitors on their territories. In fact, they can be quite nasty at times, chasing and occasionally killing intruding loons or other waterbirds. These occurrences should not be frowned upon, since loons have a strong instinct to protect their chicks or themselves from potential predators or competitors for scarce food supplies.


At other times, however, loons can be quite social. Several CLLS volunteers have commented in letters or survey reports about seeing large flocks of loons on their lakes. These are not isolated incidents; reports of flocks of over 2,000 loons can be found in the literature, but groups of 3 to 20 loons are more common.


There are at least three possible explanations for the large numbers of loons observed on some lakes.


- Loons are most aggressive early in the breeding season; adults will sometimes visit other pairs to socialize later in the season, when hormone levels and aggressiveness are decreasing. I have seen these gatherings as early as July. Some researchers suspect that social gatherings later in the summer let loons slowly prepare for the presence of other loons during migration and on the wintering grounds.

- Groups of loons might also be part of a surplus, non-breeding population, either because they are young and have not gained a territory, were displaced from their territories, or lost their nests early in the season and didn't re-nest. These non-breeding loons will often group together.

- Loons also group together just before migrating, a behaviour known as staging. Staging tends to happen on lakes with good fish stocks in September or October.



The more I observe loons, the more I realize that, like humans, each is an individual. Therefore, there are probably as many reasons for groups of loons as there are groups of loons.

- Harry Vogel




http://www.bsc-eoc.org/clls-nh2.html

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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 8th, 2014, 8:29 am 
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
And all the time I thought they were having a keg party! The ones I see are definitely showing off.. acting nuts.. like I am bigger and more flamboyant than you are! They do fake take offs while yodeling...just cause.

But with all the springtime aggression gone.


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 Post subject: Re: Birders
PostPosted: September 12th, 2014, 11:09 am 
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Reading through the ontbirds.ca message board (whew)... this post written at peak fall color by an Algonquin naturalist showed up, describing the sparrow migration passing through at the time. Other fall birding reports included tree and fox sparrow sightings at the Lake of Two Rivers airfield, making for a total of eight sparrow species that could be seen here.

Other fall sightings here reported arctic migrants (American pipit, lapland longspur), horned lark, and long-eared owls.

Other fall birding hotspots included the old railway near the Arowhon road (Mizzy lake trail), and the large marsh on lake Travers.

Quote:
[Ontbirds] Birds in Algonquin Park this Week

Lev Frid
Thu, 27 Sep 2012 09:02:18 -0700

Hello Birders,


Autumn color is at peak here in Algonquin, and so is the sparrow migration.
While the warblers have slowed right down here in Algonquin, they have now
been replaced by large numbers of sparrows, which are now common in any
open area, even along the highway. White-crowned, White-throated have been
seen in numbers, with smaller numbers of Lincoln’s and Savannah
Sparrowsand this is the time to look for Nelson’s Sparrow and LeConte’s Sparrow in
wet, grassy areas. Try the south end of the Old Airfield and the Two Rivers
Marsh for these two, or Lake Travers Marsh on the East Side. We will report
if any are seen.


Finches in the Park have been interesting. There were no reports of either
crossbill this week, but the park is being slowly infiltrated by Pine
Siskins, with flocks being seen on the 25th and occasional flyover birds
through the week. Evening Grosbeak is also around, with two birds in the
Visitor Centre parking lot this morning.


A young Northern Cardinal was at Canoe Lake Access Point on the 25th – a
very rare bird in the Park. They do not breed here and are only detected
very infrequently as dispersing individuals. A Pied-billed Grebe was at
West Rose Lake on the 26th – another uncommon bird for the Park.


Specialty birds are as follows:


Spruce Grouse: The best place has been Opeongo Road, where almost ever day
this week there have been up to three birds, including a male. The best
place along this road is adjacent to the big Tamarack (Larch) tree on the
east side of the road past the gate.


Gray Jay: Reports of this friendly jay are streaming in every day, from
birders and non-birders alike, as the birds are now approaching people for
food. The best places have been the North end of Mizzy Lake Trail, Opeongo
Road past the gate and the Algonquin Logging Museum.


Boreal Chickadee: Multiple birds were seen on the 25th at the North end of
Mizzy Lake Trail at Wolf Howl Pond, and at West Rose Lake as well. This is
the best spot for them at this point. They have also been along Opeongo
Road past the bridge, but not as reliably. You’ll hear them before you see
them.


Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports this week. Try the North end of Mizzy
Lake trail, the Spruce Bog Boardwalk, or the Western Uplands Backpacking
Trail entrance.

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