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 Post subject: Dubawnt River - Nunavut
PostPosted: September 20th, 2015, 8:42 pm 
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Report on Dubawnt River posted by Nicolas Perrault Sept 20, 2015:

http://www.myccr.com/canoeroutes/dubawnt-river


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PostPosted: September 21st, 2015, 12:31 pm 
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I'm curious to get an update on the book I left at the Carey Lake Tyrrell Cairn on the Dubawnt River -- On Top of a Boulder: Notes from Tyrrell's Cairn.

Does anyone know how to contact the trip members-- Laval Tremblay or Nicolas Perrault?

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PostPosted: September 23rd, 2015, 7:10 pm 
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Thanks Nicolas for that TR. I solo'd the upper and mid Dubawnt back in 2006, starting from Ivanhoe Lake in the headwaters, down to Wharton Lake where I was picked up. The upper river is beautiful (albeit with trees in the way to spoil the view :D ), but eventually the Barrens emerge further downstream. I do hope to paddle the rest of the river in the future some time.

Re your comment in your TR about ice concerns on Dubawnt Lake in August: I entered Dubawnt Lake on Aug 5 in 2006, and the ice was long gone. Since that trip I have been monitoring Dubawnt every summer on the MODIS imagery. I have never seen ice in August via satellite since I have been monitoring it. With global warming increasing year by year, evidenced by weather data, and the retreat of the Arctic sea ice, I do not think we will soon see the weather of old in the literature where the mighty Dubawnt kept its ice cover some summers. Unfortunately the Planet continues to warm at a frightening pace.

On my last subarctic trip (2011, man I gotta get back to the arctic soon!), skirting just beyond the tree line on the Upper Lockhart, I observed many groves of young spruce, with few to no dead stems in the stands, indicating that these were first-growth new stands creeping north onto the tundra over the past 50 or so years. The tree line does seem to be creeping north again in some areas.

Entering Dubawnt Lake early August does allow a team plenty of time to complete the river at Beverly Lake, or continue down to Baker before it gets oppressively cold (but plan on many windbound days).

MODIS has links to image archives going back many years. Its a challenge to find the cloud-free images, but with enough searching you can piece together an ice-out history for many of the big lakes. For example, here is an image link to Aug 2, 2015 where Dubawnt Lake can clearly be seen ice-free. http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/imagery/subsets/?subset=Arctic_r04c01.2015214.aqua.1km

One summer does not make a trend, so no guarantees for next summer's ice, but based on the trends, I would bet its ice-free every August for the next long while.

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PostPosted: October 3rd, 2015, 3:25 pm 
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My : e-mail is : n.perrault@securenet.net

My remarks concerning the ice on Lake Dubawnt were mainly based on a trip Laval Tremblay and myself had along the Thelon River back in 2009. Around August 7, we arrived at Lake Aberdeen. After one day paddling along its shore we suddenly encountered an enormous quantity of ice. It was impossible to go any further. After reaching the shore we were soon entirely enveloped by ice. It had an approximate thickness of at least 20 cm. We hurled big rocks on the ice to evaluate its strength. It easily resisted the impacts. There was ice as far as the eye could see. We were hopefully icebound for only one day. Thereafter a gale hit Lake Aberdeen pushing the ice on the opposite side! We could obviously have spent many more days in this predicament. Since Lake Dubawnt is much bigger than Lake Aberdeen it is clear to me that being icebound on the former can happen even more easily than on the latter.

Nicolas Perrault


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