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PostPosted: June 20th, 2012, 8:37 pm 
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Hi all,

I am planning on going paddling in the Adirondacks, and am curious about taking tripping food across the border. I found this old thread and was curious if anyone has any more recent experiences.

This page looks pretty 'official' but seems to contradict itself.

It first states:
Quote:
Meat, milk, egg, poultry, and their products, including products made with these materials, such as dried soup mix or bouillon, are either prohibited or restricted from entering the United States


but then later says:
Quote:
Food products from Canada, including pet food and fresh (frozen or chilled), cooked, canned or otherwise processed products containing beef, veal, bison, and cervid (e.g. deer, elk, moose, caribou etc.) are now permitted from Canada in passenger baggage.


Colour me confused! Anyone have recent experience? Should I just plan on buying food once we cross? That is tough since I like to have stuff prepped and packed, but can do it if necessary!

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PostPosted: June 20th, 2012, 9:32 pm 
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I suspect but don't know for sure that there are some differences for food imports brought in "hand-carried" and intended only for your own consumption.

ANY food shipped into the USA is subject to the FDA-Prior Notice system

http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplia ... efault.htm

It's kind of complex in the requirements although once you know the system and if you are doing it for bulk/commercial shipments it's not so bad.

On the page indicated above you can find a 24hr help line where you may be able to get a proper answer.

The Prior Notice system is just paperwork, it has nothing to do with the standard food restrictions such as most meat & dairy products and virtually all citrus.

............

Ok I found a page that seems clear (as mud). The first paragraph refers to "commercial use" and included hand-carried, the second refers to personal use but makes no mention of hand-carried.

Personally I would call either CBP of the FDA and probably both. I did have to wade through the Prior Notice system once a few years ago, it was a bit of a nightmare but I did get very good help on the phone.

Like most of this crazy regulation bureaucracy the actual accuracy of the documentation was totally irrelevant, as long as the forms were filed, and the provided authorization numbers were included with the documentation then it all just sails through.

Quote:
Prior Notice for Food Importation
The Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 (Bioterrorism Act or BTA), Public Law 107-188, established the requirement that food items, imported (or offered for import) for commercial use, including hand-carried quantities, be properly reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration prior to arrival of those items in the United States. The FDA prior notification timeframes (by transport mode) are two hours by land, four hours by rail or air, eight hours by vessel and prior to the “time of mailing” for international mail.

Food that was made by an individual in his/her personal residence, or food purchased by an individual from a vendor that is sent by that individual as a personal gift (for non-business reasons) to someone in the United States is not subject to Bioterrorism Act requirements. However, food that is sent to an individual in the United States by a business is subject to special requirements of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. For instance, if you go to a food shop in England and buy a gift basket, then take it to the post office or a courier service to send to a friend, the shipment is not subject to BTA requirements. But if you go to that same shop and ask them to send the gift basket for you, the shipment is subject to BTA requirements, and the vendor will have to file Prior Notice. Many travelers are finding that vendors will not ship food directly to U.S. residents because the reporting requirements can be time-consuming to complete.

In general, failure to provide complete, timely and accurate prior notice for Bioterrorism Act regulated items, can result in refusal of admission of the merchandise, movement of the goods to an FDA registered facility (at importer expense) and/or civil monetary penalty liabilities for any party that was involved in the import transaction.

For full details regarding the latest FDA requirements, including those food items exempt from these requirements, access the FDA's Counterterrorism-Related Legislation page. ( Counterterrorism-Related Legislation )


Don't forget to use a payphone or throwaway cell phone otherwise you WILL be targeted at the border :rofl:

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PostPosted: June 21st, 2012, 7:00 am 
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We went kayaking on Isle Royale NP for a week starting last US memorial day weekend. Entering the USA We were never ask what food we had. Food did not seem to be an issue. Thinking we may have a problem,We did not have anything fresh. No meat or fruit. We bought that in the US. We bought some "boil in the bag "cooked chicken and a Rice and bean meal. Both meet the Algonquin no can rule, so we brought some home.
Just answer the questions ask honestly and don't volunteer answers to questions not ask :o
Stay safe
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PostPosted: June 21st, 2012, 12:37 pm 
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Just answer the questions ask honestly and don't volunteer answers to questions not ask :o

9 times out of 10 that's probably fine but if you do get pulled over and you have a couple of weeks supply of food that you did not declare you are probably in for a world of hurt.

Pre 9/11 not a big deal, post 9/11 you are running afoul of the

USDA
FDA
CBP
Homeland Security

In the old days, a seizure of the offending materials and/or perhaps an insignificant civil fine was the worst that would happen, you would probably still get admitted.

In the post 9/11 world, it's seizure of ALL your assets (vehicle) and the possibility of a stay in the crowbar hotel while you await deportation.

If you are going to do a border run best to do it with something valuable (a truckload of pot) than risk it on a box of camping food. Besides you should be able to buy anything you need south of the border and probably with more choice and lower prices.

In any event, make a few calls to get the official scoop and let us now what you find out.

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PostPosted: June 21st, 2012, 1:07 pm 
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I can't sit still any longer.

don't volunteer anything. If asked what you are bringing say you are bringing stuff for a camping trip.

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail ... rsonal-use

The appropriate paragraph is this one.. There were two cited by the OP. The latter pertains to coming from Canada. The former pertains to all other countries.
Quote:
Canadian Agricultural Products:

For fruits and vegetables from Canada, consult the FAVIR database.

Fruits and vegetables grown in Canada are generally admissible, if they have labels identifying them as products of Canada. Fruits and vegetables merely purchased in Canada are not necessarily admissible, i.e. citrus or tropical fruits such as mangos, which clearly were not grown in Canada because it does not have a climate that supports those crops. (Potatoes from western regions of Canada are currently restricted because of a disease outbreak. While commercial imports are permitted under stringent guidelines, travelers from Canada should avoid bringing raw potatoes with them into the U.S.).

Food products from Canada, including pet food and fresh (frozen or chilled), cooked, canned or otherwise processed products containing beef, veal, bison, and cervid (e.g. deer, elk, moose, caribou etc.) are now permitted from Canada in passenger baggage. Products containing sheep, lamb, or goat will not be allowed entry.

The passenger must provide proof of the origin of beef, pork, poultry, cervid meat, and pet food in order to bring them into the United States. Examples of proof of origin include the grocery store receipt where the product was purchased or the label on the product indicating the province in which it was packaged.


Remember US citizens every day go to Canada to do their weekly shopping then return home.

The laws change every so often . For a while beef was a no no due to the "mad cow" outbreak. The above is from May 2012.

So far twice this year I have done some grocery shopping on my way home from Canada and was asked once. I just told them I had got some great cheese. As long as it was under $800 of cheese they were happy.

If you are going to some parts of the Adirondacks there is good grocery shoppin. Lake Placid for one. Saranac no. Long Lake no-both do have sad grocery stores. Tupper has basics..Shaheens. Blue Mt Lake..uhuh.


Last edited by redsoxnation on June 21st, 2012, 3:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: June 21st, 2012, 1:47 pm 
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redsoxnation wrote:
I can't sit still any longer.

don't volunteer anything. If asked what you are bringing say you are bringing stuff for a camping trip.

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail ... rsonal-use


Good link, that's the one I tried to find but couldn't.

Better make sure you are only bringing the mushroom flavoured Ramen and not the chicken flavour! :rofl:

Quote:
Allowed:
-Noodles and ramen that do not have meat or eggs in the spice packets

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PostPosted: June 22nd, 2012, 12:24 pm 
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Thanks guys!

I think I'll go with my regular meal packing strategy. If they ask, I will tell them what I have. If they take it, I'll stock up on Freeze Dried stuff at Adirondack Outfitters or something. Not idea, but should get me through a weekend!

Thanks!

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PostPosted: January 25th, 2016, 10:50 am 
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Is this information from 2012 still valid?


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PostPosted: January 25th, 2016, 1:37 pm 
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I'm not aware of any changes, best to contact US authorities for confirmation.

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PostPosted: January 25th, 2016, 2:37 pm 
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All I have is anectdotes other than the references cited. We crossed in Sept to come home. As I am US Citizen returning home I get different questions no doubt.

I have almost always brought back excess jerky and plain forget about it. Yah we had jerky last trip.. Never got asked.

We are careful with exotic fruit. Figure out mangoes will get confiscated as they are not native to either country. Eggs another thing that is touchy. I suspect papayas star fruit and mangoes are not standard tripping fare..

Um we do have grocery stores here but I understand the need to be pretty well packed before leaving home. I haven't heard of anyone wanting to rummage in a 60 l barrel with dehydrated food in it.

I always wait to buy cheese in Quebec if going through there!


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PostPosted: January 25th, 2016, 3:16 pm 
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An aside - we did a RV trip to Shenandoah this past summer, and were surprised that the food in the USA was as expensive or more than the food at home (we watch prices obsessively.) We had thought we'd avoid all the border questions and buy EVERYTHING in Virginia. We won't make that mistake again. Far better to buy at home where you know the price and can adjust for it, than to buy on the spot in a place where you don't know what the cheap stores are.


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PostPosted: January 25th, 2016, 3:46 pm 
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C. Potvin wrote:
An aside - we did a RV trip to Shenandoah this past summer, and were surprised that the food in the USA was as expensive or more than the food at home (we watch prices obsessively.) We had thought we'd avoid all the border questions and buy EVERYTHING in Virginia. We won't make that mistake again. Far better to buy at home where you know the price and can adjust for it, than to buy on the spot in a place where you don't know what the cheap stores are.


Exchange rate matters. I just looked at Sobeys. Prices just a little higher there than here but with the CDN dollar at .68 on the USD you are going to get whacked.

our $1.25 2 liter Pepsi is going to cost you $2.. eek.

We came off Newfoundland last August ( after a delightful month paddling) and could bring NO vegetables and fruit. But that was going from Canada to Canada. We were inspected and our car sprayed to remove any possible plant material


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PostPosted: January 26th, 2016, 10:50 am 
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Thanks guys.

Yes, I'm talking a barrel of tripping food, most of which I dehydrate myself so I'll be buying it here at home (will purchase Ova-Easy eggs and adult beverages in the States). So it sounds like I'll be OK crossing the border.
Will probably have a cooler of food for the drive south as well. Won't bring fruit.


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PostPosted: January 26th, 2016, 12:15 pm 
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I knew of the regs about bringing veggies off NL. It was heartbreaking to go to the farmers market in St Johns.
I bought wool instead.

I don't bring fruit northbound either.


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PostPosted: January 26th, 2016, 9:08 pm 
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The next time you pass thru NB try to smuggle some Barbours peanut butter( with 'the real nutty flavour' as the ads used to say a long time ago). It has a texture somewhere between the usual smooth and lumpy varieties---little bit gritty.

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