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PostPosted: August 26th, 2016, 11:35 am 
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Joined: September 8th, 2006, 7:11 pm
Posts: 917
Location: winnipeg
This is an excellent article I've enjoyed reading a few times - just thought I'd bump it to the top for anyone who hasn't been with MYCCR as long.

Happy Paddlin'


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PostPosted: August 27th, 2016, 8:36 pm 
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Joined: September 15th, 2006, 5:09 pm
Posts: 181
Location: Toronto, ON
I am not getting it.
Canoe was designed for shallow rivers with a lot of portages.
Kayak was designed for oceans.
Why to use canoe for ocean paddling at all?


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PostPosted: August 27th, 2016, 8:47 pm 
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 11:21 pm
Posts: 1076
Location: Burns Lake, BC
Same reason you have river kayaks.
There are different designs that support different conditions.

I would much rather be in my big comfy canoe than some kayak.


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PostPosted: August 27th, 2016, 10:52 pm 
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Joined: April 28th, 2008, 4:32 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Edmonton
When I lived in Vancouver, I did not have a lot of time to get to know the paddling community there and thus, shuttles were a problem. I spent quite a bit of my off duty time exploring Howe Sound, Indian Arm and other areas including the gulf Islands. I could not justify the purchase of a sea kayak and never liked the wet hands anyway. I used my old fiberglass Rocky Mountain River Cruiser ( a wonderful Muskeg John Vlachuck design) I could almost keep pace with the few sea kayaks I encountered and never felt I was in any way handicapped by having the wrong craft for the conditions. In a blow I think the canoe was a far better choice than the kayak. I have run 2 and 3 meter swells without ever feeling I was in danger. In fact, they were fun! I got to the point that I looked forward to canoe camping on remote beaches more than I did the occasional river trip. Small rocky mountain rivers were a good training ground for salt water paddling under adverse conditions. A downriver type canoe or tripping canoe is a fine craft for exploring remote inlets and even the larger straits. I have launched in White Rock and paddled to Coal Island off the south east coast of Vancouver island a couple of times and loved every kilometer of the trips. The canoe can handle bulkier loads than a sea kayak and is not difficult to paddle with a full camping kit and food for a week. With a white light on a pole for night time safety it is even possible to sleep comfortably on board while at sea. There is a reason first nations paddlers used canoes on the west coast.

_________________

It isn't considered windy here until there are whitecaps on the toilets.



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PostPosted: August 28th, 2016, 8:46 am 
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Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8929
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
Canoes were also used here on the East Coast by indigineous people.Some like the Beothuk were designed for deep water fishin
Back in the '80s before kayaks came into popularity the Maine Island Trail ( on the ocean) was established with canoes in mind.
Some elements of whitewater skills are good here as we have reversing falls, eddies and whirlpools and the ever present danger of big standing waves on the ebb.. with a south wind, this can be fatal if you flip. Enviroment cares not what craft you are in and there are pros and cons for traveling with both types of craft.
We tend to be conservative with canoe and after 30 kmh its no fun to paddle in the wind anyway

We use canoes with low seating generally and also spray covers though reentry with those is problematic.

I just found a new website that is worth going over. Written partly for kayaks there is also information for canoeists.. Weather and waves care not whether you paddle raft canoe kayak or rubber ducky.

http://www.paddlesafely.com/


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PostPosted: September 6th, 2016, 5:22 pm 
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Joined: September 8th, 2006, 7:11 pm
Posts: 917
Location: winnipeg
Yury wrote:
I am not getting it.
Canoe was designed for shallow rivers with a lot of portages.
Kayak was designed for oceans.
Why to use canoe for ocean paddling at all?


I think SGrant outlined the reasons he chose a canoe (cost, comfort, flexibility). I've paddled a fair bit in sea kayaks and canoes and if I absolutely had to make a crossing or set out in horrendous conditions I would like to be in a big tandem sea-kayak with a very experienced friend who had a strong brace and reliable roll. I can roll, but I wouldn't bet my life on my roll. I'd also like a dry suit.

Now, that said, any crossing that I felt required a tandem kayak/experienced friend/dry suit might be something I would take a pass on anyway, and wait for the weather to calm.

In the end, judgement likely trumps equipment choice when it comes to safety. Likewise training/experience with whatever equipment we choose.


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PostPosted: October 2nd, 2016, 7:36 am 
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Joined: January 29th, 2016, 4:50 pm
Posts: 2
SGrant..... Nice informative article. I lived in the Surrey area for a couple of years but I am originally from and presently live on the east cost. I sail the Bras D' lakes in a 22 foot sail boat and canoe trip my 17.2 tripper Old Town on the Miramichi and various Cape Breton Rivers. One of the things that stuck home with your article is when we go tripping it is mostly all remote and we don't see people for days. The idea of people congestion and putting up with their bad habits makes me appreciate our sparse population, depressed economy and my remote trips even more . Don't get me wrong... I spent some beautiful days with my brother on his boat on the west coast and I am sure there are tons of remote locations to be had in the west. Your long extended summer and mild winters are a joy to behold. I enjoyed your article and realize how little I know about sea kayaking. Thanks for taking the time to post this information. Enjoy!

http://www.lostcaper.ca


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PostPosted: October 24th, 2016, 4:51 pm 
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Joined: October 20th, 2016, 6:35 pm
Posts: 5
I can't thank you enough for this post. OMG. I sort of fell into canoeing after my whistler trip and this piece is just incredible. Thank you for taking the time to help the rest of us out. Much appreciate it.


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PostPosted: October 25th, 2016, 6:10 am 
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Joined: August 15th, 2015, 10:17 am
Posts: 59
Location: Along the Grand
SGrant,

Avery informative article. Thank you for posting it, and although I am in the centre of this rather large country I must say alot of what you have written applies to the coastal paddling of the Great Lakes aswell. Again Thank You for taking the time.

Dan


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