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PostPosted: April 17th, 2019, 11:12 am 
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Thanks everyone for your input so far! The entire "barrel hitting the gunnels" idea was something that I read while researching barrels on this forum, seems like it was somewhat a false claim.

I went to MEC today to look at some of the recommended bags. First one I looked at was an Algonquin of some sort 115l. It seemed pretty wide, which I think can be a good thing rather than towering above me, however it didn't have any kind of framing or back support on it so I think I will pass on it although I did like the material it was made of.

Second was the Slogg 115L. To seal the top it said to roll it 4X then attach the buckles together. Has anyone here used this bag before? I'm not too confident on its water-proofness capabilities but with gear in it, and a bit more practice maybe it would work out fine. It seemed to be made out of fairly heavy duty material, and should be pretty puncture resistant. However I feel like I would still use dry bags for things such as clothing/sleeping bag which could add to the cost, unless I just use garbage bags but I'd rather not.

As for renting, its fairly expensive and a week end of using it would cost as much as buying one of these items. For something like a pack, I believe it is something that I can use for other things as well :)

Does anyone have a book they can recommended for learning about all gear related stuff and ideas regarding canoe camping, and perhaps some do's and don'ts?


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2019, 12:48 pm 
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Location: GTA
A back support system on the back of the large 115L bags is a good idea. There was a link posted earlier to a 115L Seal Line pack in Markham, but that one doesn't have a back support system.

As for the Slogg bags, a lot of people use them. I have a 115L Seal Line and a 60L (?) Slogg. The Slogg seems more "stiff," but it's also newer, so I'm not sure if the Seal Line was always more supple. The durability of the Slogg seems to be good/excellent. Some people use them really a lot. You might watch some of Jonathan Kelly's "Backcountry Angling Ontario" videos on Youtube. (Search for that channel.) He's out for months each year and uses a Slogg. He also has some videos where he talks about gear.

Instead of specific books, you might just read trip reports here. Or you might consider going out on a short trip with someone who has more experience to get an idea of the sort of gear you might like to use. There's a "Paddlers Wanted" and a "Trip Wanted" section here where you might be able to post. There's a mail system on this site where people can PM you (look on the right hand side of the screen for messages) about setting up trips or whatever.


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2019, 2:27 pm 
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Books by Cliff Jacobson and Paul Mason though published some 15+ years ago are still current.


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2019, 3:55 pm 
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sylvain wrote:
Second was the Slogg 115L. To seal the top it said to roll it 4X then attach the buckles together. Has anyone here used this bag before? I'm not too confident on its water-proofness capabilities but with gear in it, and a bit more practice maybe it would work out fine.


I have one, I think it seals better than the SealLine bags (not a big difference), you just need to use some care when folding to make sure you don't have "kinks". Like all of the big dry bags they seal best when at least two-thirds full and also like others a bit more difficult to work with when the temperature is very low.

I did have some leakage the first time I used it, turned out I had really misunderstood the proper closing method, once I realized my mistake it never happened again. For the way I use it I find the "grab loops" perfect for securing the bag to the boat, something that was deficient on my old SealLine (very old version, things may be different now).

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PostPosted: April 17th, 2019, 4:51 pm 
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Location: Edmonton area
I would recommend a roll top canoe pack (MEC Slogg, Eureka Canoe Pak, Sealine Pro, etc.) in around 115litre capacity. That way, as you use food/fuel, the pack will get smaller, and if it turns out that you don't end up liking canoe tripping, you can use those types of packs on vehicle roof racks to keep things dry during travel.

That canoe packs don't have frames is a plus; they fit better into canoes, and because most portages are not hours long, a frame is not required for comfort on your back. If you correctly seal a roll top canoe pack, it will not leak just from a dump or from any kind of rain. And, they are lighter and cheaper than barrels with harnesses.

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PostPosted: April 17th, 2019, 5:31 pm 
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Location: HFX, Nova Scotia canada
I have a couple 115 L Sealine Boundary packs that probably have 300 plus days use on each of them. A buddy has a Sealine Propack ( heavier duty one)that he has had for more than 20 years. Incredibly durable when taken care of. Bought a smaller Slogg, seems to be as tough as the Sealines. Will know in 15 years.

Something to keep in mind. You can put less gear in a large one, can't put more gear in a smaller one.


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2019, 5:46 pm 
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Location: Guelph, Ontario
I have always tripped with a Barrel for cooking and food items and big 115L dry bag for clothing sleeping bags etc. I too had my dry bag filled too full and found out it wasn't sealing properly when I took on a bunch of water in a rapid. I'm actually planning on making the shift to all barrels. They tend to be better at keeping the stuff inside drier. The barrel harness are usually only on for a few KM at most and not on all day. You can also buy a nice harness like Ostrom or NorthWater that are more comfortable as well. There is a thread about barrel harness here somewhere. The bonus is that two barrels make a nice set of table legs for cooking and dinner.


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PostPosted: April 18th, 2019, 2:09 pm 
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Ok thanks again everyone for the recommendations/ideas, recommendations for checking out trip reports and book ideas! Although deep down I'm sure that just talking about this is getting some of us even more excited to get out there!


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PostPosted: April 18th, 2019, 3:43 pm 
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Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
open_side_up wrote:
Here's a SealLine Pro 115L pack at a good price. ($120/Markham, ON)

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-hobbies-craft/m ... nFlag=true


The Sealline 115 Pro-pack quickly became my big go-to dry bag.

https://www.seallinegear.com/pro-pack-closeout

It has decently comfortable shoulder and waist straps, a chest strap should you need it, a seriously reinforced bottom where most needed for pinholes. $150 USD retail, that used Kejiji pack may be a bargain.

The only roll-over close bags that (maybe) won’t leak in a pressurized pin are the Watershed bags with WP zippers and roll overs.


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PostPosted: April 18th, 2019, 7:01 pm 
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I replied to that add but never got a reply. Unless they come to my area/cheap shipping it wouldn't be worth it for me to go there. Thanks for sharing though, I can't even get that ad to show in kijiji even if I type sea line in the search bar.


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PostPosted: April 18th, 2019, 7:19 pm 
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I use a 115 L Eureka pack for our clothes, tent etc. I find that the back support is OK for km ports that are relatively level at least. I like barrels for food. I don't hang barrels whereas I used to hang bags(another subject discussed elsewhere.)

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PostPosted: April 19th, 2019, 7:59 am 
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Location: Collingwood, On
I would also suggest you look at the Scully series of dry duffle bags at MEC. I've had mine for 4 years now, taken it on an extended trip to Ecuador where it was handled very roughly, had it on every canoe and fishing trip and it hasn't failed me yet. Being a rectangular duffle bag it's also incredibly handy to pack and drop into the boat....just don't intend to open and close it frequently. While tripping I use it for all my tent/hammock, sleeping bag, mat, spare clothes, camp stool, etc...all the things you unpack at the end of the day and put away in the morning. It's noted that they don't provide submersible waterproof protection but I've paddled and portaged in the rain all day with mine in the bottom of the boat and everything is perfectly dry. They also have integrated shoulder straps for portaging and if packed properly are very comfortable to portage.


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PostPosted: April 19th, 2019, 4:02 pm 
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I have a Scully 100, I like it.

BUT....I would NOT recommend it as your only dry bag, not sure I would recommend it as a second dry bag either, maybe as a third bag. For me it's my 4th bag/barrel.

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PostPosted: April 26th, 2019, 7:38 am 
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Neil Fitzpatrick wrote:

Maybe you could hit up forum member Chris Randall to make you something. He doesn't have a pack listed for sale but there's a photo of one on his site. I have his barrel organisers (Brit spelling for Chris), paddle pockets and custom PFD pack. Very high quality stuff and he's in Manitoba so Canadian shipping won't hurt as much as CCS.

http://canoepaddler.me.uk/


Thanks Neil for the endorsement. Just to update things, I have a new much nicer website at https://www.canoepaddler.net/ with some pictures of my standard offerings.

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PostPosted: April 28th, 2019, 5:46 pm 
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If you haven't bought something already, I'll be the contrarian. Buy the barrel and a decent harness. It's bomb proof. I stopped using canoe packs years ago. I've had many sealine and similar packs, they've all proven to be defective in the long run, either springing an unexpected hole, or the harness straps breaking.


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