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PostPosted: April 16th, 2019, 3:36 pm 
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I'm daydreaming about a dry suit again. Another thread introduced the Ocean Rodeo suits and pointed out that they are a Canadian company. The Heat model is really cheap right now ( C$679 ). It looks good overall. The one thing it doesn't have is wrist gaskets. It has the neck gasket and attached dry socks.

https://oceanrodeo.com/product/heat/

At that price, how big an issue is it not having the wrist gaskets? Particularly if I'd be pulling neoprene paddling gloves up over the cuffs anyway?


My most likely real world use would be to finally start paddling some spring whitewater in Ontario. If get to do another far north whitewater trip, then it would be nice to have then too.

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PostPosted: April 16th, 2019, 4:36 pm 
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No wrist gaskets? That's really bizarre.

If you dump you will definitely be taking on water, how much is hard to say. Might just be a trickle or maybe not depending on the length of time in the water.

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PostPosted: April 16th, 2019, 5:08 pm 
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Splake, yes, it does have wrist gaskets. It would not be a dry suit without them.

In the ad that you provide the link to, in the Compare Suits Chart, it lists that they have "trim to fit polytex seals". Polytex is an alternative to latex, that many people claim is more durable than latex. The Heat is Ocean Rodeo's flagship drysuit. It most certainly does have waterproof wrist gaskets.

If the ad itself, and me, do not convince you of that, contact Ocean Rodeo and ask them, they are very easy to talk to, and they provide stellar customer service.

Cheers

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PostPosted: April 16th, 2019, 5:15 pm 
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Nice thread. I looked at the spec section, I didn't see it mention a relief ziper there on the heat, just the other more expensive ones, maybe I overlooked something there.

Not to take it off course but if I could ask as I know next to nothing about these...... for use in Ontario spring or fall use when it's cold or say to Superior shore sometime.... Do you buy it large and wear a sweater fleece and such over top of your regular pants and stuff? Any broad suggestions or link to previous threads. Thanks a bunch.


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PostPosted: April 16th, 2019, 6:13 pm 
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First off, a correction to my last post, the Heat is the lower end of the Ocean Rodeo drysuits, not the flagship of the line, but it still has wrist gaskets.

Steve.of.London, generally people wear wicking base layers under fleece onesies under a drysuit when it's cold out.

The fleece garments are purpose made for drysuits and I think that most drysuit manufacturers also sell them.

So yes, you would want to have a suit that is at least one size larger than what you normally wear for clothing. I've never met anyone who wears pants under a drysuit. I that would be very restrictive I think.

A relief zipper is always a good thing to have if funds permit, but they are not by any means essential.

One thing that a lot of people don't realize is that a drysuit, once donned, must be "burped". This is done by putting on the suit, opening either the neck gasket with your fingers, or the relief zipper if you have one, and squatting down to push all the excess air out of the suit. Otherwise you will look like the Michelin Man, and have a difficult time of keeping your face out of the water if you end up in it. If you don't burp the suit, you end up like a beach ball with a face, which is funny to see, but not so much for the person in the suit.

The Ocean Rodeo suits don't look like typical dry suits. They have an upper that is constructed to look like a jacket, and they allow you to pull the top of the suit over your head in what they call "stand-by" mode, when you will be wearing it out of the water for any length of time. When it's time to get back onto the water, the top of the suit pulls back over the head and zips watertight closed. A very nice feature.

The neck and wrist gaskets generally need to be stretched over a tin can or ball of some type, and cut to size for the wearer. It's easy to do. Replacing torn gaskets is also relatively easy as well. I've had an Ocean Rodeo Soul drysuit for several years now, and the gaskets are still in very good condition, which is normal for all makes and models I think.

Cheers!

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PostPosted: April 16th, 2019, 8:36 pm 
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Thanks for your time there....


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2019, 11:18 am 
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Thanks guyfawkes041

The line for the "Neoprene wrist seals" which are only available on the Ignite and Boss suits had given me the impression that there weren't wrist seals on the Heat suit. I hadn't realized that it was calling out a 'premium' feature of the more expensive suits.

How do you like the "jacket" style for the upper? What I'm wondering there is if it would be more of a pain when do you have to swim.

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PostPosted: April 17th, 2019, 4:38 pm 
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Splake, the jacket is a plus IMHO.

It provides pockets, a collar, and a removable hood, and it looks good, and really doesn't add any noticeable bulk.

I've swam in my Soul a lot on a swiftwater rescue course on the Panther River in the foothills near Sundre Alberta, and in Bras D'or Lake, and the Atlantic in Cape Breton, for hours at a time. I never felt that the jacket part was a hindrance in any way.

Check out this kite surfing video about the Soul, to see how the jacket works (sorry, you'll have to highlight/copy/paste this URL into the URL bar on a search engine as I don't know how to do the active link thing on this site)

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=vi ... ORM=VRDGAR

The thing to remember is that it is not really a jacket, it only looks like one; it is a one piece drysuit that the top part can be pulled on or off. Great for driving to your put in. Cheers.

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PostPosted: April 18th, 2019, 8:33 am 
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That's great info. Thanks

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PostPosted: April 23rd, 2019, 7:33 pm 
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That looks like a fine dry suit. The last mods for the truck and some atv accessories are being installed this week. Time to look for some good personal stuff.


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PostPosted: April 24th, 2019, 7:33 am 
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I had 2 kokatat dry suits over 12 years. I bought the ignite about 3 years ago. It is superior to kokatat in everyway for canoe tripping.

1. I can take the top on and off without removing my life jacket. This means that I can use it as rain gear with no neck gaskets and quickly seal it when approaching a rapid

2. It has pockets... neoprene lined hand warming pockets.... hard to explain how nice it is
3. It fits and moves like good quality goretex rain pants and jacket. Comfortable to portage in, does not feel like wearing a poorly tailored garbage bag
4. swimming... it sucks in all dry suits... try not to swim. Not significantly worse than kokatat
5. It looks sharp. Not like george bluth escaped blue man group
6. Internal suspenders... keeps everything fitting nicely with the jaket off and tied around the waist.
7. Removeable hood. this hood is amazing for paddling in foul weather. It seals up to a tight eye slit like good helly hanson foul weather gear. It removes with a single zipper and can be packed away if you would prefer to be more streamlined in nice weather.

this thing is not even in the same class as kokatat or other traditional river drysuits. Think of it more as fully waterproofed immersion protected goretex foul weather gear.

I cannot speak to their lower end models. I have no experiance with them..

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PostPosted: April 24th, 2019, 8:38 am 
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That's a great reference for the Ignite. The $600 price difference is still a consideration.

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PostPosted: April 24th, 2019, 8:45 am 
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steve.of.london wrote:
Nice thread. I looked at the spec section, I didn't see it mention a relief ziper there on the heat, just the other more expensive ones, maybe I overlooked something there.

Not to take it off course but if I could ask as I know next to nothing about these...... for use in Ontario spring or fall use when it's cold or say to Superior shore sometime.... Do you buy it large and wear a sweater fleece and such over top of your regular pants and stuff? Any broad suggestions or link to previous threads. Thanks a bunch.

Steve, a relief zipper is a very desirable feature. I wouldn't buy a drysuit without a relief zipper. If your drysuit doesn't have a relief zipper, in order to pee you need to unzip the drysuit's main zipper, take your head out of the neck gasket and your hands out of the wrist gaskets, and pull the drysuit down below your waist, which is a hassle. With a relief zipper, a man can pee as easily as when wearing pants with a zipper fly. When kayak fishing in a sit-on-top kayak, I regularly use my relief zipper to pee into a funnel while sitting in the seat of the kayak. Women's drysuits have a "U" shaped zipper which runs across the back of their hips and down the sides of their upper thighs, and are also easy to use.

A major advantage of a drysuit is that you can layer up as much or as little clothing underneath the drysuit as you need to keep warm and safe. If you will be paddling away from shore, you need to dress for the water temperature, not the air temperature. However, in order to be able to keep warm in cold weather and water conditions, you need to get a drysuit with plenty of room underneath it. I frequently do multi-day kayak trips and kayak fishing in situations where there is ice floating on the water and it may snow during the day. Here is what I typically wear under my drysuit in those conditions: (a) on top, light polypro underwear, expedition weight underwear, and two or three sweaters, (b) on bottom, expedition weight underwear and two pairs of pile pants, and (c) on my feet, two pairs of thick warm polypro socks under the drysuit's dry socks. If you go for a trim stylish look when buying a drysuit, you won't be able to get enough clothing underneath the drysuit to stay warm in low air temperatures, and to provide adequate protection against hypothermia if you end up in the water. Your drysuit should look baggy when you are wearing it with only one layer underneath it.

A drysuit should have dry socks, not ankle gaskets. Your feet are the thing which is most likely to be wet or in the water when you're wearing a drysuit. If you get a drysuit with ankle gaskets, your feet will usually be cold and uncomfortable. If you get a drysuit with dry socks, you can layer up enough thick socks under the dry socks to keep your feet warm and comfortable even if you are standing in cold water for extended periods of time. Be sure to get footgear which is several sizes larger than your street shoes, as tight footgear will constrict your circulation and make your feet cold.

Don't get a dry suit with a rear entry zipper, which is a straight zipper which runs from shoulder to shoulder across your back, unless you have tried it on and are sure that you can open and close the zipper by yourself. Most people have to have a companion open and close a rear entry zipper. Get a drysuit with a diagonal front-entry zipper. The Heat drysuit discussed at the beginning of this thread has an unusual design where the zipper begins and ends on your chest, and runs around the back of your neck. A person with normal flexibility should be able to open and close that zipper by him or her self.


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PostPosted: April 24th, 2019, 3:40 pm 
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I just checked the suit compare chart. I would not reccomend the heat.

1. No Pee zip... this is a deal breaker.
2. 200 Denier vs 400 .... re-enforced wear points are massive pluls for canoe tripping when you are sitting/kneeling or portaging all day
3. Hood. Its awesome in foul weather.... warm, dry, and can layer with a touque... makes freezing headwinds and driving rain an almost pleasant experience
4. Waist belt... when you are swimming this helps you stop from turning into a balloon (even after burping) it distributes the flotation from the trapped air evenly between upper and lower body.
5. Internal dry pocket... my car has an electronic key fob. I use this suit for playboating and kiteboarding. Not having a key / cell phone pocket means that I need to carry a drybag. Not a big deal for tripping, but very inconvient for kiting, sup, playboating.

$600 is $600... but if you can swing the money the extra features are more than just useless flashiness.

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PostPosted: April 24th, 2019, 4:12 pm 
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Thanks Dan, I see in the value in the upgrades.

The price consideration has a lot to do with it being a starting point. I need a dry suit to actually do any spring whitewater paddling - even day trips. But, since there is still a fair bit of effort and driving involved in doing some spring runs I don't want to over commit on the investment.

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