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PostPosted: June 26th, 2012, 3:30 pm 
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Hi forum,

So, I'm going to try to catch my dinner one night this trip. I've been canoeing in Algonquin for years, but fishing will be a new to me. This year's trip will take me to Big Trout Lake where I plan to have a rest day. It sounds like the lake is full of...Trout...so I want to give it a go. I have a few questions that I'm hoping that someone can answer.

1. I'm planning to just pick up a little collapsable rod that I saw on sale at Winners. There will be a bit of portaging required to get to Big Trout Lake, so I don't want to carry too much. That said, are there any particular lures that I should bring with me?

2. Bait. I'm guessing that leaches will make ideal bait?

3. Is evening the best time of day to catch a fish? Is the rule of thumb to keep the line closer to the surface in the evening when the fish are eating bugs? And keep it deeper mid day? It sounds like a few of the island sites have good fishing near to submerged logs just off shore.

4. MOST IMPORTANTLY: what the heck do I do with the fish once I've caught it? By this, I mean that if I catch a fish in the afternoon that is big enough to eat for dinner, what should I do with it in the hours between? I read somewhere that it is best to wrap it in a wet towel and leave it in the shade. I was also told to string a chain through it's gills and tie it to my canoe. Any thoughts here? If I leave a fish sitting out all day in the open air, will it go bad?

4. Lastly, what is the best way to kill the fish before cutting its head off? When I was a kid I seem to remember having put a fish in a garbage bag and thwacking it against the ground? Should I club it? Put a knife in its head?

Yes, I realize that I have no clue what I'm doing, so thanks in advance for any tips. Oh, and by the way, given the fact that I have no idea what I'm doing, what are the chances, do you think, that I'll actually be able to catch something that is big enough to eat?

Happy paddling!
Kent


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PostPosted: June 26th, 2012, 3:50 pm 
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Kent,

Why don't you take a look at my book, A Guide to Wilderness Canoe Fishing.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/146790 ... d_i=507846

This is not a commercial website so recommending my own book feels a little questionable.. However, at 2.99 Kindle, I don't exactly feel like I am promoting a used car or life insurance policy either.

Also, let me also encourage. Once you have developed a few skills, fishing on a canoe trip is an absolutely great way to spend time.

Frankr


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PostPosted: June 26th, 2012, 5:05 pm 
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Kent

I'm not far ahead of you in the fishing knowledge department......

1 - If you can find them EGB lures, more expensive than what you find at Crappy Tire but they work. Can be found a La Baron and probably other specialty fishing shops.

http://www.egbcanada.com/

2 - I have no idea what if any live bait is allowed in APP, better check first.

3 - Can't really help you on this one, too many factors I think.

4 - I think you can safely leave it lying around for a few hours, yes out of the sun and if there are eagles in the area out of sight or you may end up going hungry!

5 (4a) - That is what a Nalgene bottle is for! One good smack to the head should do it.

As for the chances of catching anything, can't say, I restrict my fishing to places where even the most incompetent idiot can catch something.

Last thing, barb-less hooks, crimp the bard before you fish and have a hook removal tool handy especially to get those Pike off your hook.

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PostPosted: June 26th, 2012, 6:20 pm 
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Kent,

Trout are notoriously hard to catch during the summer. Try for bass if any of the lakes have them.

I use a regular rod attached to the rear seat and a thwart with velcro. In that position it's hard to break it. Cheap collapsible rods are not much good.

I think any live bait is forbidden in Algon. In any case I wouldn't carry it. I use crankbaits(rapala etc), spoons or spinners.

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PostPosted: June 27th, 2012, 8:43 am 
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Threeopus, fishing for trout in summer will be more difficult than early spring when most trout are being caught.... here's a page describing how deep you need to fish and gear:

http://www.brooktrout.ca/deep-water-bro ... niques.htm

OTOH, trout fishing in late Sept can be productive when surface waters cool off... the lure can run relatively shallow and nearshore.

Fishing for bass can be good in July, you're more likely to catch something on a lake that has those. If I were on BT on a rest day during summer, I'd probably relax and paddle over to Grassy Bay and the cliffs nearby, spend some time checking out the scenery and wildlife. There are also wetlands in an eastern bay on BT. Anyway, good luck if you do decide to fish.

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PostPosted: June 27th, 2012, 9:28 am 
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look for moving water - moving water tends to bring the food to the fish, so they hang out there. use your map to find streams running into the lakes, or for narrows between lakes which may have some current; wind creates a surface current - look for places where the wind line ends around a point or island - generally the fish will be feeding at the surface there, watching for wind blown goodies to settle out

along the shoreline, look for steep cliffs with sharp dropoffs; long rocky points which gradually sink to deeper depths; bigger boulders that provide shade and hiding cover for fish - bass and northern pike like to hide in the weeds, so fish the edges of weed beds

as for lures - I'd go wiht a bit of variety. Rapalas ususally work, and you can get them for different depths - one floating jointed, one deep diving, maybe a suspending one; jigs are good for working the bottom of the lake and down those deepening points. maybe one bigger, heavier lure which will be easier to cast farther, esp in the wind. For lake trout, a 4" or so spoon like a Johnson's Silver Minnow can be worked on the lake bottom - just jig it a little as you are drifting in the wind; deep diving rapalas and wally divers are better for trolling.

Brookies seem to like red/white daredevils and spinners like Mepps- I like the Mepps with the feathererd hooks; general rule of thumb, use bright lures for sunny days, and darker lures for overcast days

If you will be fishing where there are northern pike, use a leader between the line and the lure, or you will lose the lures to sharp gil plates and sharper teeth - I generally use a steel leader all the time

if its hot, the first and last hour of daylight is best time for fishing


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PostPosted: June 27th, 2012, 9:48 am 
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For trout in mid-summer, the approach I have had the most luck with is using a bottom bouncer and a William's Wabler.

Bottom Bouncing for Trout

A great resource for fishing in Algonquin is Steve Molson's map book:

Algonquin Park Depth Maps

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PostPosted: June 27th, 2012, 10:48 am 
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Everyone, thanks for the replies and the great information. The more I try to wrap my head around everything involved with fishing, the more complicated I realize it to be. I will still plan to bring a small rod with me, and to read up as much as I can before leaving, but I will not plan to catch anything. I'll keep my expectations in check.

Frank - thanks for the book suggestion. I will read it. I first just need to figure out how to get a Kindle app on my phone.

Recped - thanks for the gear ideas.

Wotrock - I'll rethink that Winners rod.

FROZENTRIPPER - a great link. Cheers. I had been surfing around trying to find mention of cliff jumping on or around BT and I found nothing. Would love to do that. Do I understand it from you that there are cliffs on BT with deep enough water below for jumping? When looking at a map of the lake, where abouts are those cliffs?

Mattt and Splake - Tons of great info. Thanks! I realize that there is more to fishing that I had expected. I hope I'll be bringing some beginner's luck with me.


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PostPosted: June 27th, 2012, 11:24 am 
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wotrock wrote:
Cheap collapsible rods are not much good.


Are the not cheap (from my perspective) collapsible rods any good? This one for instance: http://ca.wholesalesports.com/storefron ... 77578.html

The convenience of a telescoping rod in a canoe seems ideal, but I don't want to have a really sucky rod as a result. I've always used a 2-piece rod, but I break one every year or two of canoe use.

Frankr, I'll look into that book. Is it relevant for northern Saskatchewan fishing?

Cheers,
Bryan

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PostPosted: June 27th, 2012, 12:02 pm 
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pawistik wrote:
wotrock wrote:
Cheap collapsible rods are not much good.


Are the not cheap (from my perspective) collapsible rods any good? This one for instance: http://ca.wholesalesports.com/storefron ... 77578.html


Decent telescopic rods have been popular in Europe, but most NA anglers think about the cheap plastic blue POS from Crappy Tire when asked about telescopic rods. I'm sure that will be fine. Look into the ones by Amundson, probably the best bang for buck in tele rods.

http://www.thefishinhole.com/index.cfm? ... t&se=26511

There's also what are called "pack rods", instead of sliding together they come apart in three or four pieces and slide into a hard case. Just be easy putting them together so you don't get a couple pieces stuck.

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http://www.thefishinhole.com/index.cfm? ... t&se=25970


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PostPosted: June 27th, 2012, 12:28 pm 
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Bryan - I've always been happy with Shimano gear - both rods & reels. That includes a Shimano pack rod - multipiece as opposed to collapsible - that I picked up on clearance for about $20 with reel and day pack. So yes, I'd happily take that Shimano collapsible rod.

Generally speaking, I'd say a 'cheap' rod is fine. The reel is usually the 'cheap' thing to stay away from. Fortunately Shimano has some $20 rear drag spinning reels at Canadian Tire and elsewhere that work really well. There are nicer and more expensive reels out there, but you can count on the Shimano's and they won't break the bank.

The kids also have some FisherGirl Survival rods that have been going strong for about 8 years now. No idea what make the reels are on those but they have held up just fine too. The kids have pulled in just as many lakers on those rods as I have on more expensive gear.

Just remember, fishing is easy it's the catching that can be a challenge.

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PostPosted: June 27th, 2012, 1:46 pm 
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FROZENTRIPPER - a great link. Cheers. I had been surfing around trying to find mention of cliff jumping on or around BT and I found nothing. Would love to do that. Do I understand it from you that there are cliffs on BT with deep enough water below for jumping? When looking at a map of the lake, where abouts are those cliffs?


Paddling towards Grassy Bay from the main part of BT, you'll pass through a narrows and when the lake opens up (Trout lake?), the next headland on the left will have cliffs, west facing. I don't know about any place to jump off, but they're scenic to paddle next to, esp when the evening sun is lighting the rocks and Grassy Bay beyond adds to the variety along with wildlife. Opposite the cliffs and across the lake IIRC is an old logging camp, maybe marked on your map. Cheers!

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PostPosted: June 27th, 2012, 1:57 pm 
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I would 2nd the recommendation of Algonquin Park Depth Maps, Vol 1, as an excellent resource.

Also, if you have 4-6 weeks before your trip, you might try joining OFAH, to take advantage of their membership kit:
http://www.ofah.org/membership/kit

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PostPosted: June 28th, 2012, 12:29 pm 
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I spend an inordinate (excessive my wife would say) amount of time fishing each year, and always use a collapsible rod for backcountry canoe trips. I like to drag a line behind me all day long as we paddle, and it is simply too much time and hassle to pack up a stowaway rod at each portage. With a collapsible rod I can leave it rigged and collapse it at the beginning of each portage in seconds. I put a couple broom holders in the side of the canoe to hold it so I don't even have to open up a pack to stow it. The other advantage is I am ready to fish at the end of the portage within seconds so I can wet a line before anyone throws a canoe in and spooks all the fish; especially at the bottom of a rapid!

All that being said, not all collapsibles are equal, but good ones don't necessarily cost an arm and a leg either. The best and most durable ones I've found are the silver fiberglass ones that are available at some CT and WalMart stores. They are getting harder to find though as everyone is gravitating toward graphite for rods. They are good rods for most fishing, with the notable exception being jigging for walleye in which the lack of sensitivity is a problem.

I second the notion of using a good quality reel, even on the crappy rod. I think a good reel, with a good quality drag tends to compensate for the less than ideal rod.

Everyone has already noted that it will be difficult to catch trout in the summer. Going deep is really the only option; other some of the rapids may still hold trout in the summer; all depends on the water temperatures.

Pack a rice dinner one night, then if you don't catch fish you still have the calories to get you through; if you do catch fish it is a nice accompaniement. By not packing a main course it will give you more incentive to catch fish!

Tight lines!


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PostPosted: June 28th, 2012, 2:43 pm 
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First things first...

Fast Facts about Ontario Outdoors Cards and Fishing Licences

http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/en/Business/Le ... 64832.html

The Algonquin Park website is a source for fishing info:

http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/visit/re ... n-park.php

Of course, you will want to read very carefully the Zone 15 regulations:

http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/stdprodconsume ... 001334.pdf

I recommend picking up two copies of the paper version. One for at home, and one to take with you when you are camping.

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