View topic - TR: The Witnessing of the Arrival of Spring in Temagami

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PostPosted: May 11th, 2007, 11:28 am 
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Rob,
The portage from Obabika to Shish-kong is only steep and not that difficult. I'd give it about 2.5!
The other one from Shish-kong to the north is only muddy at the end and since I was there the last time a boardwalk has been built so you don;t have to slog through the muck, 2.5 as well!
I only rate them like this because I have seen much worse and these are neither long nor particularly scary.

LadyDi,
I assume you got the paper maps from Rob H. for the Marshall loop with necessary info. I was in the area in 2000 and it wasn't that scary or difficult

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PostPosted: May 13th, 2007, 9:22 am 
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Location: The Gateway to Woodland Caribou
View from Smoothwater Eco Lodge
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The wide part of the road into Sandy Inlet
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Red Suirrel Lake
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Little snake sunning himself on the rocks at the portage. Seen a few of these throughout the trip.
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Lake Temagami
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Old Cedar Canvas canoe washed up on shore. Looks like it has been there for some time, surprised nobody has tried to take it yet.
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Knee deep water hole along portage into Obabika Inlet.
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Obabika Inlet. Note the birch trees. Plenty of evidence of the fire around. Campsites looked unused and in rough shape.
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This old car was located just before the portage into Obabika. There was a trail and there was another car buried in the bush. Looked as if it had been there many many years.
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The very Algonquin-like portage into Obabika. Saw plenty of these guys on the portages.
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Looking North up Obabika Lake
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The Sweat Lodge at the north end of Obabika
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Cooking Bannock on a stick.
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The biggest darn Moose footprint I have ever seen. I am wearing size 13 and it is almost the entire length of my foot.
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The north end of Shish Kong. There is a portage there, can you see it?
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This is the boardwalk at the end of the portage into Mud Lake.
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Look at this tree! Grows up and then back into the ground.
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Just a reminder that winter was not that long ago. The puddles were iced over and there was still lots of ice in hidden crevices.
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Mud Lake. This is when I was really starting to feel good. Pretty lake!
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This is the take out at the other end of Mud Lake. Like walking on a sponge. Weirdest feeling I ever had. Got to admit I felt really unsafe walking on it too.
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Bob Lake. One of the pretiest lakes I have ever been on. I noticed alot more Black Spruce which I think are more typical of the north. Really made me feel like I was up there.
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A couple of water fowl. Appear to be different breeds but I am sure they were nesting together. These modern ducks, what can you say.
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Portage into Diamond. The path is narrow and well worn. Like it has been used for thousands of years. Onigum.
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Wolf scat. Was kinda blown away by the amount of it I saw on the portage into Diamond.
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This is the moment I discoverd Spring had arrived in Temagami. The dull grey Birch trees all of a sudden had this pale green tinge to the tops.
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This is the firepit I made while staying on Diamond. Note the stacks of tinder and various sizez of kindling. I even had 3 inch diamater birch cut and split. All of this remains for the next weary camper. I use very little firewood. Just enough to boil my tea billy in the mornings.
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View from my makeshift campsite on Sharp Rock Inlet.
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This is looking out into Sandy Inlet from the top of the Napolean Portage.
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A sign with the native name of Sandy Inlet.
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This is just a small selection of the 163 shots I took.


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PostPosted: May 13th, 2007, 10:04 am 
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A couple of water fowl. Appear to be different breeds but I am sure they were nesting together. These modern ducks, what can you say.

Thanks, nice pics that bring back memories! The ducks are Common Mergansers - male and female.


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PostPosted: May 13th, 2007, 10:21 am 
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Erhard I still can't believe your choice of reading material. You surely must have read the Simarillion by Tolkien as well.

Oddly enough now that I am home I am desperating trying to find some time to finish it. Going to Scotland in a few days and really want to visit some of the places mentioned in that book.

I figured at least one was a merganser but I didn't know that the male and female version of an species looked so different.


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PostPosted: May 13th, 2007, 8:01 pm 
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Quote:
figured at least one was a merganser but I didn't know that the male and female version of an species looked so different.

Yeah....the males are the better looking of the 2!
Rob, great report and now photos! Temagami kinda grows on you, doesn't it?


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PostPosted: May 13th, 2007, 8:09 pm 
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rob in angus wrote:
I didn't know that the male and female version of an species looked so different.


Well thank gawd for small miracles! 8)
Oh, I'm sorry, I see you mean ducks :oops:

Great pictures Rob...what a trip - what memories. You certainly earned your stripes on that one. I can see the wind. Very beautiful.

Thanks for posting...now Scotland - boy, what a nice life. Have fun.
Di

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PostPosted: May 13th, 2007, 10:04 pm 
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Hi Rob,
Nice to see the solo trip report pics. The solo tripper always has a different set of photo themes to share. (I can relate).

Quote:
Quote:
I have reached a new level of exhausted. The wind has beaten me. I was ready to go home. Right then. Right now. I was so tired I was unalbe to eat my supper. I ate about half. i even manged Bannock on stick and I love bannock but was simply not able to eat much of it at all.

I am so tired. I am in bed well before sundown.


This is completely normal! :D My solo journals have this “exhausted” note entered all the time, every trip, and I have skipped dinner occasionally. I am amazed at how tough it can be. Makes us stronger! Incentive for some working out before the next solo trip.

Quote:
I quickly pinched the barbs off my lures


This is what I do too. Its also good safety for you on a solo. You catch a big pike and it can shake and impale you on barbs. Go barbless for lures. I do keep the barbs on my jigs though, since without them, the twister tails come off. But a jig is easy to control when taking it out of a thrashing fish.

Quote:
The wind got stronger as they day went on and I was going bonkers.


The longer the trip, the more often you get windbound. It’s completely normal! Good reason to spend some time on the pre-trip book selection to ensure some quality reading down time. I look forward to my days off, usually one every 5 days. You do your laundry, write in your journal, do some swimming, cut some wood, repair some stuff, have a nap, and bake some bannock. On the Barrens you can hike all day.

Quote:
wind would start form nothing and you could hear it build until it came rushing down the bay and rattle the hell out of the tent. This happened every 30 seconds it seemed at varying intensities all night.


Even in the trees, I use a 4 season (expensive), bomber wind tent which I guy down with multiple lines, using bungee shock absorbers tied to each guy line. Although the tent is overkill for down in the trees, it is well worth it. A 4 season mountain rig with the bungees tends to rattle far less. I sleep light so I like a tent that can be rigged drum tight and rock solid.

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As I lay there half a asleep in the middle of the night all of a sudden I get a bop on the head. It was if something pushed it's way into the tent and when it reached my head it backed away.


Ha ha! :lol: Again, totally normal. This has happened to me on several long solo trips. It is not an exciting trip without a least one big critter bumping your tent. It may have been the wolves playing with you. I have had wolves causing mischief around a tent a few times. I also sleep with the axe in the tent (for the bear). Its not wilderness unless there is something there which can eat you.

Quote:
Not without stopping in Temagami and spending some $$$$


Good man! Spend $ in northern towns and let ‘em know it was a canoeist.

Quote:
A simple broken ankle and I surely would have been in a critical situation and most likely died.


Naw, you were fine! 8) Its instinctive to be more careful solo. I have never heard of a serious solo guy getting hurt. Take the necessary precautions and you’ll be fine. Our culture has way exaggerated the risks of solo travel. In many ways it can be more safe that group trips. Like Bill Mason’s quote: “All my life I have been warned that solo travel is dangerous. Funny, but I have never heard that from somebody who has actually done it”.

So now you have this one under your belt, and survived in style. What about the next one? 10 days? 2 weeks? I know you want too…… :wink:


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PostPosted: May 13th, 2007, 10:19 pm 
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Thanks for your comments HOOP. I know these long solo trips are old hat for you and appreciate your advice.

I made a point of spening $$$ up there after reading that thread about canoeist being cheap dates. I had a conversation with John Salo of Ontario Parks in the restaurant afterwards. I was kind a weird going into a small 10 table restaurant in a town of 1000 and seeing somebody you know. There was a town councilor or something like that behind me judging from the conversation as well.

They knew I was a canoeist and I think I spent over $300 between lodging, fuel, souvenirs, and food.

I really do want to go for a longer stretch. Reading your mentiosn of month long trips really intrigues me. Like Ghost Brigade said on ottertooth, being away from the family is what bothers me the most. I think i will try to do at least one solo a year of about a week and then when the kids are older and don't care where Dad is and the wife is desperate to get me out of the house I can become a real adventurer.

I always brought a hatchet until I read your comments about an axe. i don't have a huge one but I ffind splitting wood is much easier and safer with the axe rather than a hachet. I alos feels it offers way more protection against a bear than my big knife.


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PostPosted: May 14th, 2007, 7:40 am 
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Hey Rob;
Glad to see you've finally started to put some nice scratches on that shiny new Langford. :clap:
Soon enough it'll be looking as rough as mine :oops:

I'm headed up to Temagami on Wednesday, leaving for a 12 trip, starting on Obabika. I'll be following some of the same route you paddled, up Obabika, through Bob into Diamond, and then up Lady Evelyn...

Looking forward to it.

MicMac


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PostPosted: May 14th, 2007, 8:51 am 
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Rob,

This is a better read and includes a good short history of the country. And any Scot who sees your copy will be a friend for life.

How the Scots Invented the Modern World
the true story of how western Europe's poorest nation created our world and everything in it

by Arthur Herman

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 Post subject: can we blame them???
PostPosted: May 14th, 2007, 10:07 am 
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kingfisher wrote:
How the Scots Invented the Modern World
the true story of how western Europe's poorest nation created our world and everything in it

by Arthur Herman


A-Hah! I knew it :o
created our world and everything in it
It's all Their fault
Uber-Posers,
with their flashy outfits- those swishy skirts all checkered-up in every colour, fishing knives in their socks, jaunty hats with trailing ribbons, velvet jackets! and then those Pipes- that the whole World wish they had invented
all that marching and blowing
mm-mff . . . I get it now

The Scots created Global Warming!

8)

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 Post subject: Re: can we blame them???
PostPosted: May 14th, 2007, 6:04 pm 
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siren1 wrote:
and then those Pipes- that the whole World wish they had invented all that marching and blowing
8)

I take that to be a "typo". It's not that the 'whole World' wishes they had invented the bagpipes, it's that the whole world wishes the Scots had not invented them.........well maybe not the whole world, only those who haven't over embibed or are not on drugs!
:(

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 Post subject: Re: can we blame them???
PostPosted: May 14th, 2007, 7:16 pm 
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wotrock wrote:
siren1 wrote:
and then those Pipes- that the whole World wish they had invented all that marching and blowing
8)

I take that to be a "typo". It's not that the 'whole World' wishes they had invented the bagpipes, it's that the whole world wishes the Scots had not invented them.........well maybe not the whole world, only those who haven't over embibed or are not on drugs!
:(


:roll:

O b v i o u s l y
'He-who-couldn't-wear-a-Kilt-if-he-wanted-to-in-the-manner-he-paddles his canoe' hasn't been to the Maxville Games - where one finds representation from every corner of the World,
Pipe bands from: Japan, Jordan, Jamaica, the Bronx and of course Uganda
They don't always get the colours right for the tartans, they make up their own.
(I once saw a Hallowe'en version, yup, black and orange-very Tony-the-tigerish)

Yey for Marching Pipe Bands and bare bottoms!

:clap:

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PostPosted: May 14th, 2007, 7:55 pm 
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Ye Gawd, it's like a virus. But there's some pretty stong drugs in some of the places you mention, not just 'erb!

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PostPosted: May 14th, 2007, 11:09 pm 
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Rob! and Hoop!

Axes are for splitting wood and knives are for cleaning fish and spreading peanut butter (not necessarily in that order).

Bear spray is for close range, non lethal defence against bears.

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