View topic - Agawa Canyon Sept. 26 to Oct. 2, 2015

It is currently December 3rd, 2020, 12:46 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: October 16th, 2015, 5:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3089
Location: Milton
Edit note: Fixed the glitch that happened in Part III, Don't know what happened but there seemed to be a break in service on that upload....weird :oops:


Agawa Canyon September 26 to October 2, 2015

This year’s trip was to be a little different for several reasons.
And this years report will be a little longer, still pic heavy, if you want the readers digest version just go to the album link at the bottom of the report and read the captions I put under the pictures.
For one the Passenger train died a painful death this last summer so access to the Canyon was in question.
My son and an old paddling friend (70) where interested in going so I did not open up the invites to too many this year.
My friend ran into some serious health problems and my son took a job in New Brunswick, but the start date was pushed back so he was back in.
Water levels are a question every year, last years extreme flooding to this years low rain fall as the trip date approached.
A major rain event happened September 7th pushing the river up to flood levels and a little rain the week before leaving the river at the minimum levels to run it.
Trip prep for this river is important depending on the levels, more so when the river becomes a rocky boulder garden for much of the rapids.
Packing light and having a boat that draft little water makes life a lot easier, but you know there will be some walking and getting your feet wet.
Normal paddle strokes are pretty well useless and finding a spot that resembles what you will encounter is even tougher.
We had hoped we could use our single boats with the water levels dropping and no major rain in sight we choose to take the 2 Discovery’s because they draft so little water, even when loaded.
My biggest concern was the logging road access from Frater to Eton and what kind of shape it would be in, the ride I had arranged was called out for a job at the last minute.
I could not find anyone else so it was decided to try on our own and if it didn’t work go paddle on one of the other routes in the park.
We printed off Sat. images from the Ont. Mapping site since their images were not too old.
We knew it was over 120km round trip from Hwy 17, I would drive in and my Wife Anne would look at the maps and area as we drove in so she could recognize the way out. We made her a ditch kit for the truck should she run into trouble on the way out.
We quickly discovered that a lot of people drove in to access their camps, so that worry was quickly alleviated. I do have a truck so clearance was not an issue, but it is only 2-wheel drive. After Frater Station most of our time was spent in 2nd, with a few hills needing us to drop into 1st., but the road at this time was in great shape.
But it still took us almost 2.5 hours to get in.
We got to the bridge before Eton and yes the river was low, no surprises there.

Image

There is a camp at the bridge and the women came out to talk to us and she recognized me from past years taking the train in. Like most people I have met on the train they were concerned we didn’t know the river.

My son PJ and I unloaded quickly and got going. In the 3.5 k from the Eton Bridge to Eleven Mile creek we encounter several short shallow easy rapids and swifts.

Image

Image

Our first photo opportunity came along quite quickly as my Son spotted a neat cloud formation. It took a few weeks to find a reasonable match and the diagrams online make it easier how they formed. The wind was strong coming out of the southwest coming in over the coastal hills Lake Superior and they formed what is known as “ Leniticular Clouds”
Quote from one site “For example, when stable humid air blows over the top of a mountain range, it often forms a group of big waves on the downwind side of the mountain range. If the temperature is low enough on the downwind side, the moisture in the air will condense to form uniquely-shaped clouds we know as Leniticular clouds.”
Cool eh?

Image

Image

Since this was my Sons first trip in a solo and his first trip to the Canyon in warm weather since 89 when he was just under 2 yrs old, I would let him lead into some of the great vistas you encounter when paddling the canyon.
You cannot see the falls at Eleven Mile Creek till you round the corner and enter its system, you can hear it then BAM !

Image

Since the Sue and Jim Waddington got me started on the Group of Seven Hunt I have not seen this A.Y Jackson at a similar level to his painting here since 1991. There is a little more rock debris in the split falls than the painting and my 91 images.

Image

Image

Then after you are done drinking the eye candy in at the bottom of the falls you climb to the next level. There are a couple of caves created by boulders and this time I remembered to bring a flash light to see if there were any markings.

Image

Then there is more eye candy for you.
Looking through the gap in the middle falls of AY’s painting.

Image


Turn around and get a good look at the upper part of the gorge.

Image

Water falls

Image


And “Small” rocks

Image

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Last edited by jedi jeffi on October 17th, 2015, 6:59 am, edited 3 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 16th, 2015, 5:57 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3089
Location: Milton
Part II

We carried our gear down to my normal starting campsite and were not surprised that it was unused since my trip last fall. The firewood we stacked standing up last years was nice and dry and ready to go. There was a balsam tree down across the campsite that we made short work of. We cut it in about 8’ lengths and made sure the pieces were up off the ground so they can be firewood next year.

Campsite.

Image


I went over to check the condition of the thunderbox I dropped off last year and added a nice new shovel to dig new holes when needed.

Image

PJ went for a swim while I got the fire and our dinner prepped.
Sirloin steak, baked potato, and corn on the cob!
The plan for the night’s entertainment was just to sit back and enjoy the campfire and the sounds of the canyon. That plan quickly changed as the nearly full moon rose over the canyon walls.

Image

I had tried in other years to get full moon shots with the moon backlighting the giant White pines on top of the canyon walls, but the lunar cycle just never lined up quite right with any of the trees since I got my big lens a few years ago.

This year it did, with also beautifully clear skies, and I got my shots!
And yes it is that impressive standing there.

Image

Image

We walked up and down the tracks looking for other chances of some shots.
It is amazing just how bright it gets in the canyon.

Image


The moonlight shinning down on the rapids caught PJ’s eye and he asked me to get a shot of it. It was a very good idea!

Image

First morning breakfast of fresh scrambled eggs and smoked back bacon….
(Now you’re more jealous than for just the scenery)
It was a beautiful sunny day but very damp, it can take the sun quite a while to make it into the canyon. So I packed up my camera gear and tripod to head down to the Lawren Harris location to await the sun and the shadows that really make a picture match the painting.
Dampness in the canyon is a real problem for photography; it gets in everywhere so this year I made sure I had enough things to even clean the sensors and it paid off.

Image

Link to painting
http://cybermuse.gallery.ca/cybermuse/e ... mkey=45530

PJ chose a spot out of sight while I waited to get the image and the shadows timed just right.

Image

We went back to camp and hiked up along the boulders to the Goudge

Image

With the lower water levels it exposes the old crib system of the rail bed.

Image


Last year this was under water.

Image


Fun to climb through the boulders and very relaxing.

[img]https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-9Ek15mtGXnY/VhuuTsdhnvI/AAAAAAAARWA/iZd6pGkrDqA/s800-Ic42/Agawa%252520Canyon%252520Sept%2525202015-24.JPG
[/img]

Finished the hike and went back to camp for some coffee and a group of hikers went past pretty fast, but their dog did come down to talk to us.
After coffee we went out on the river for some prep time for the river trip tomorrow.

Image

We paddled ¼ way down the first rapid to the first pull spot and introduced him to boulder paddling on the Agawa. This way PJ would have some idea where to go because when you look at the rest of the rapid it looks like a walk your boat job.

When we got back we had had another great dinner and PJ signed in on the official 116.25 register.

Image

Image

Ceremonial Fire

Image

I got ready for the lunar eclipse but the weather had other ideas, just as the moon was about to cross the canyon line some lake affect clouds moved in. The reason I chose this date was to hopefully get a shot of the eclipse over the canyon. In hindsight I should have gone both nights to the location I chose. Oh well another reason to go next year.
It was another really warm night but when we woke it was very dull and threatening, we where in a pretty protected spot with tons of firewood so we decided to have breakfast then decide to go or stay.
The clouds lifted and the wind up high slowed down so we broke camp. It was a good decision because of the weather we would have the next day.
Pj always had a very good memory and he remembered all the zig zag moves we looked at yesterday. Since this was is first attempt at solo ww (rocks) I thought he would get stuck a ton, but he made it through quite easily.

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Last edited by jedi jeffi on October 17th, 2015, 5:33 pm, edited 3 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 16th, 2015, 5:58 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3089
Location: Milton
Part III

The second rapid is always a little different because of the sharp rocks that fall in from the trackside and they are very sharp. I was carrying most of the gear so PJ would have an easier time in the shallows, and that extra weight made me catch a real sharp one on the nose just above the waterline. It did take a chunk out of the out layer. I took both boats through because there were still places you could wrap a boat.

Image

The next two rapids were shallow/bouncy but easy enough to do. The weather was threatening again and starting to rain so we stopped to put on our shell jackets. The rain and air was warm but past experience with cold fronts coming off the lake says make sure you are warm and dry when they hit.
It sopped raining by the time we got to Canyon Park but was still dark and grey as we passed the first G7 spot.

Image

Conditions improved a bit as we hit the mouth of Bridal Veil falls and PJ went in as I set up to get some pics of him in front of the falls.

Image

Image

I moved in to get some various pics of the falls including this JEH MacDonald location.

Image

Conditions up close were really perfect for a longer exposure.

Image

The tour train was late coming in this day so those on board would have a good look at us in front of the falls.
Conditions again took a turn for the worse but still got a shot of PJ in a A.Y. Jackson location

Image

At “Good Hope” rapid I ran both boats through because there are still some places wrap a boat for a rookie but because the water was so warm the rocks were really slimly and it was a hazardous walk up along the shore.
We stopped at the Ice Climbers camp to check out the condition and we had a lunch on a rock bar in the centre of the river. I new knew we would need a rest because there was going to be some walking/pulling.
The rapid at Mile 111 was boney as expected and we only had to pull through the last 25m of it.
The long rapid were the Agawa turns towards Superior is a lot of work to go through at this level, there is a lot of poling and pushing off of the rocks and the dark conditions did not help to see the tiny channels. I stood up all the way and only got stuck once, PJ made it all the way.
This movie has been stabilized twice but it gives you a good idea of how rocky it is.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=is4jldnt93s

The fog off the lake was really rolling in and you could feel very cool air mixing with the warm moist air. We set up camp at the mouth of the Little Agawa and we just got up the one tarp and got a fire going when the monsoons hit. I put up the day tarp over the tent door so we could set up the sleeping arrangements and change out of our wet paddling gear.
At this point of changing I notice my leg is all bloody, and I figured I must have done it on one of the hard slips I took in the rocks. As I start to clean off the blood I find this tiny super engorged leach still partially stuck to my leg. (He was as round as he was long)

A very damp night led to a cool damp morning but the mists of the Agawa where performing. It is very easy to sit there and just be mesmerized by what is appearing before your eyes.

Image

After the first performance of the day we packed up for a day hike up to the “Little Falls” site and back down to the side canyon at Mile 111. We hiked up the long way because last nights rain main the rock face really slippery. When we got up to the falls we saw the gift the rains had given us. In all my trips since 85 I have never been to this location and have the water flow match the “Little Falls” paintings.
Today was different, we got a match!
There was a little brush hanging down from the left side, but I am not one to cut/clear brush for a picture. So shoes/socks off pants rolled up and into the water I go with the tripod.

Image

And Painting match.
http://www.arthistoryarchive.com/arthis ... h-1918.jpg

We hiked up the side canyon at 111 up to the small falls. This little creek is the “mist” generator for this end of the canyon. At this time of year the sun does not warm up the backside of the canyon walls and the cold air flies down here, we where only in T-shirts and we were frigid.

Image

We decided to climb the canyon/cliff face on the north side of this creek to see if we could get a good view and we tried 3 different approaches and none worked. I should have brought the ropes and harnesses but it was a good hike anyway.

Image

We where in the woods when the tour train went in so we decided to have lunch at a rock cut so we could get a good pic of the train with the hill we tried to climb in the background.
While waiting we watched what we late identified as a Fisher swim across the river and run into the woods.
View from the rock. Looking south.

Image

The rock cut put us about the same level as the windows in the train and it was fun to water the reaction as the passengers saw 2 guys out in the middle of the canyon. The cliff face in the background is the one we tried to get to.

Image

We got back to camp had some coffee and then made our way up the lower section of the Little Agawa. The rock was now dry so it was a much easier, safer climb.
Lots of eye candy here for your waterfall enthusiast and you can see we Lawren Harris did so many paintings here. It makes me wonder just how many more from this location there actually is out there.

Image

Image

Image

The Waddington’s sent me a painting image in the spring of this year to see If I knew where it was, I had never taken a image from the angle he painted it, but I have hiked across it many times. It was easy to match the rock angles, but what is really interesting there is an “almost” match half way up the falls, there is enough similarities to make you think it is a match, and that is pretty weird.

Image

It was getting firewood for the night I broke my long time companion a 2.5 lbs ax handle. I didn’t bring my larger break down saw so I was using the ax to cut a split standing balsam stump that was about 8’ high. This is the tree I cleaned out a few years ago when it first snapped and blocked the trail from the river. I just gave a little twist and I heard the ax handle crack, it was twisted a little bit but still attached. I was only going for half the stump and it broke off quite nice.
It was dry enough so I was going to split it lengthwise and my son asked if the Ax would stay together…. I thought so…..one swing the log split cleanly, (mostly because of the splits when the tree snapped years ago) and then the ax handle fell off, but that gave us more than enough wood for the fire and some nice solid pieces for whoever might be next. That we stacked so they would not rot in the damp conditions that exist there.
Someone had gone through the effort to collect a large pile of branches, but do to the lack of use and the very wet past two years there, the branches where all rotten and were no good to start a fire. We spread those back out on the forest floor to clean up the fire pit area.
It was a very nice cool day and the temperature dropped to -2c as we had breakfast, of course it was very damp and our wetsuit boots never dried out, so we cheated, we heated up some extra water and poured it into the boots before we put them on. ☺ We put our short sleeve shell jackets on over the PFDs because we new we would warm up quickly.
I led through the shallows and small boulder gardens till the river channels define themselves better. That way PJ had really clean site lines as he paddled into he flat-water section above the old logging dam. Those that have been here before know what I am talking about. What is really fun was watching his eyes and reactions, and yes he had to stop for pics! I didn’t take any pics because it was too much fun watching him, but here is an older image of the view.

[img]https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-M5fwuaeo9Cs/UI2Dd3gobkI/AAAAAAAAJss/PtUHRr71Lc4/s800-Ic42/2401151320094307541RSTXXe_ph.jpg
[/img]

I took both boats through the upper portion of the old logging dam rapids, even low still a place for trouble during the first 100m, but afterwards it is knowing how to get through this, did I say the river was low.

New game, find Jeffrey.

Image

Entrance to the pool above the first falls.

Image

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Last edited by jedi jeffi on October 17th, 2015, 7:51 am, edited 5 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 16th, 2015, 5:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3089
Location: Milton
Part IV :o

At this level we carried the gear and I paddled the boats to the middle of the falls and lifted over and paddled to the top of the 2nd. Falls.

Image

We paddled/bumped our way to the falls, emptied the boats and crossed the river to see the top of the falls. We changed into our hiking boots and had a snack to get ready for the portage. I always bring a good rope and use it to slide the boats down the first hill and to use as a banister to go up and down with the gear. This year we needed it again. The gap at the top of the hill to the river was completely blocked this year by a white pine and the debris pile was almost 3 m high. Someone earlier had pushed a bit of a new path to the right but the decent was extremely steep so again we used the rope and it made it so easy.
So going with the whole tour and adventure program we got in the boat and we paddled and lined the canoe up to the pool at the bottom of the falls. Even at this level the chop is quite bigger than it appears in the movie and we got stuck on a rock on the way up

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXeSUZKhRLQ

After the falls run we had planned to go down to one of the hardly used river campsites but one look at the gravel and rocks that awaited us changed our minds. We just did not want to get wet. What helped make up our mind was the high water a few weeks ago deposited a lot of driftwood on the two islands. There is usually very little wood at this time of year at the falls campsite
It was just another sunny day and we where lucky with that rain the other day as the rivers level was pretty steady and this section of the Agawa from the falls to the lake can change dramatically from year to year and the river can be much wider.
The first two shallows ended up being much better than we anticipated with just a couple of steps needed in the first one.
The new channel 500m downstream of the falls (river left) that has been developing the last couple of years was completely clear of the logjam and sweepers at the top. There are still two trees going from bank to bank 50 & 100m down the channels that would be a hazard in higher water, (the large shallow channel would be paddle able then)
Where the channels meet up and spit again at the same spot was our first walk and pull but it was only about 100m long.
We stopped at the pool to take pics of the dry channel and watch the Eagles playing in the thermals above us. I could not get my big lens out fast enough as they did their dance where one will turn upside down while flying.

Dry riverbed

Image

Canyon hill and the River channel down.

Image

It was slow going but we only had one other 100m walk and once all the channels came together again it was smooth but rocky going.
The current going into “zig-zag” has changed with the big floods of last year and this spring. It is rockier and the entrance channel is left of centre, which should make the turn a little trickier in higher water.
We stop at the bottom of “zig-zag” for the hike up the side canyon here on river right, not quite as fluid as the last couple of time up, but still pretty,

Image

Next step

Image


3rd step

Image

Looking back down.

Image

A word of safety when bushwhacking in such steep rocky terrain.
Don’t stay too close to anyone you are traveling with. The rocks/debris can be very loose, make sure you communicate that you are clear of any fall zone.
This is exactly what happened to us. Going up no problem, coming back down the exact same way. I got down, yelled “clear” PJ started back down when all of a sudden a rock about 400lbs came loose underneath his feet. It dropped over 2 m to the bottom, I was good, but I left one of my trekking poles at the bottom and it wasn’t so lucky.
Simple rule but well worth following.

Back to the boats we only had about 1km to the next campsite. At the end of the pool after “zig-zag” is the last technical rapid of the river, there is a large house rock, river right before a rock face. Here is another change to be aware of in higher water; the main channel now flows directly into the middle of the house rock so it could cause some un-suspecting paddler some problems.
This next pool right by the campsite is where we found someone’s plastic paddle. We had been following fresh ABS tracks on the portages so we can only assume it is theirs, we found it just below the high water mark of the rain event two weeks before.
It was still nice and warm and dry so we hung out all our sleeping stuff to get the dampness out and then we crossed the river in our canoes to get some driftwood for a fire and some driftwood poles to lash the canoes together for the lake crossing the next day.
So far we had seen Eagles the entire trip, but nothing up close, and very few fish in the river. As the sun was setting we noticed they where now moving up the river by the camp so we where hoping for a closer look at the Eagle tomorrow.
We had planned for a big long hot fire since PJ would be soon would be moving to New Brunswick but that petered out as we got very strong gusty winds out of the east and it started blowing sparks everywhere. So who ever got to use this campsite hiking the Towab trail would have quite the stash of very dry driftwood.
From here to Burnt Rock Pool there is one small rock garden to get through at this level. We met some fishermen who camped there that were also surprised at the lack of fish.
From Burnt Rock Pool to the lake I was pleasantly surprised, the heavy floods last year and in the spring have created a neat natural phenomena. As wide as the river is here, the river has created some natural gravel and sand dams which made the whole stretch “a lot of fun” (PJ’s quote) and it was. There was one stretch about 10m long at one of these dams we had to pull across but that was it for the day.

Even though the river looks really high, this is just one of the pools behind those dams and even from a distance it looks like a horizon line showing a drop.

Image

We never really got close to an Eagle even though they’re where a lot more fish in the river. This Juvenile was a little beat up and had some trouble getting up in the air. Usually there is an adult or 2 with a young juvenile but there was none close to this one.

Image

Image

We saw what we assume was a Golden eagle, it dwarfed the Adult Bald Eagles we saw, but it stayed low and quickly move away from us.

But we did see some fresh bear tracks and some little older wolf tracks.

Image

Image

Even though I did not get that Eagle picking up the fish it was great to get a pic of him paddling in the canyon.

Image

The plan was if it was windy and the lake was rough my wife would pick us up at the bridge at Hwy. 17, if not we would lash the boats together and paddle back to the Agawa Bay Campground. The two best poles we found where just long enough, but the boats would be touching in the middle.
We paddled our set up as a one bow, one stern paddler.

Image

Looking back at Hwy. 17

Image


The wind was a very strong east wind that was mostly offshore, it created some small choppy waves and because of the boats touching we got some water splashing in which we stopped to bail a few times. It was really interesting feeling the currents as we paddled along the shore, some times it was very easy and fast and other times we had to work, you could really feel the currents on the boats.
We beached the boat and got the gear up to the trailer where my wife had stayed the week and had a super refreshing hot shower!
For the coming out diner we had Shepherd’s pie and my Wife surprised us with some locally craft beer from Outspoken Breweries in Sault Ste. Marie and it was Great!

We then got to watch another great Agawa Bay sunset

Image

But here is a secret, don’t go back to your tent/trailer early there might be a second show, and Superior did not disappoint!

Image


Later it was star watching time and processing my pics from my trips and I found I had a guest appearance of an Orionid meteor from Oct 2nd. I was shooting the Big Dipper and just caught a little tip of one with a fairly wide tail. We saw 6 that night, 5 where very large ones that went long distances.
The bright object in front of the yellow tail is part of the meteor, I took several shots of the big dipper with different long exposure times and it was not on them. Cool!

Image

All in all another great trip and more reasons to go back!
There is just much to see and do up there no matter what your interests!
Jeff
Album Link (readers digest version)
https://picasaweb.google.com/1142241160 ... directlink
Link to youtube channel and some other short movies.
All shot with a Polaroid cube
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCay90B ... UxktA2Q27Q

PS I am retired now so I have to do something for fun. :oops:

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 17th, 2015, 9:01 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 30th, 2006, 1:31 pm
Posts: 410
Location: Hamilton ON
So jealous.
I have only scimmed through your report and I am fascinated. I will have to read it over and over.
Jim


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 19th, 2015, 10:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 2nd, 2003, 12:09 pm
Posts: 379
Another great report & fantastic pictures Jeff. Very timely as I watched the TVO Group of Seven show last week. Thanks for posting.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 19th, 2015, 12:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: January 11th, 2005, 4:58 pm
Posts: 1975
Location: Manitoba
As always a great report with stunning photographs.

_________________
Brian
http://www.JohnstonPursuits.ca

 


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 19th, 2015, 4:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 3rd, 2014, 4:35 pm
Posts: 326
Love it totally want to go.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 19th, 2015, 8:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: April 6th, 2007, 8:42 pm
Posts: 421
I love the look of that country. Thanks for sharing.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 20th, 2015, 2:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: November 20th, 2014, 5:29 pm
Posts: 263
Location: Horseshoe Valley, Ontario
Very cool. After watching the Group of Seven movie last week and reading your reports, I definitely have to go.

_________________

Shawn http://myselfreliance.com/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIMXKi ... q2UJePJEog



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 21st, 2015, 9:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2014, 9:28 pm
Posts: 4
great trip report...hope your enjoying retirement....
group of seven movie??? pls provide link if possible.
know that the group who did thom Thompson movie were doing a move
is that to whom you refer?? Drhntr shawn??


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 21st, 2015, 10:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3089
Location: Milton
TVO is done with their broadcasts, you could call them and see if they will run it again.
Someone might have it in your area on their pvr. or you might be able to see it at one of these locations.
http://www.whitepinepictures.com/painte ... -of-seven/
It is a good movie but they did not show too many Agawa Canyon locations.
But I know a few ... :D
Jeff

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 22nd, 2015, 7:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 3rd, 2004, 10:51 am
Posts: 281
Location: Aurora (Borealis)
Fellow Adventurers:

"Painted Land: In Search of the Group of Seven" can be viewed online at the following link:

http://tvo.org/video/documentaries/pain ... eature-ver

-JF-


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 22nd, 2015, 9:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 3rd, 2014, 4:35 pm
Posts: 326
Thanks, can at times be a needle in haystack to find those links.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 22nd, 2015, 9:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 12th, 2014, 9:28 pm
Posts: 4
Wonderfull thanks for posting ...have been waiting for this to be available for some time


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group