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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2017, 3:36 pm 
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We have a trip planned starting today, for a week, in the Kwarthas. A nice week long basecamp trip up to a site where we'll stay for the week. I did all the food dehyration and prep. I even came up with a great beef stew that dehyrates and rehydrates really well. We have some new gear to try too: a duffle dry bag for our personal gear that is wider instead of the usual long and narrow, making it easier to get at stuff. Also a new Neoair mat to hopefully make my side-sleeping more comfortable, including a custom cotton cover for more comfort and warmth. Everything packed up and we were on our way!

Just around the corner, my brake pedal felt odd. Went home and checked and sure enough a rear brake pipe leak. We had to cancel the trip! $50 penalty to the governement for cancelling the permit.

Now, we are at a loss for what to do this week. We'll probably just go back to work and hope for an early start next year.

:( :( :(


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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2017, 3:44 pm 
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Joined: August 8th, 2017, 9:14 am
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Definitely worthy of sympathy! I once missed a (non canoeing) trip to New Brunswick in a similar circumstance when my alternator blew the day before departure.


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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2017, 5:36 pm 
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Joined: April 16th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Had a similar issue last year and this year. Had to cancel trips due to bladder cancer and a few other health issues. Never made it north for two years.

I would have rather have had a brake problem but hey, not to belittle your issue, life throws at you what it does. When handed lemons in life, make lemonade and share it with your friends.

Hoping next year I might fair better. I really miss Temagami.

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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2017, 9:02 pm 
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Joined: July 16th, 2006, 8:59 pm
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Location: Now in Sudbury
What? Don't you have front brakes? They do most of the stopping anyways. ;)


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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2017, 9:24 pm 
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Joined: October 9th, 2009, 9:52 am
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Location: Toronto Beach(es)
Not all that spendy to splice in a section of brake line, or replace a wheel cylinder for that matter. Don't give up on a week long trip yet!


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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2017, 11:05 pm 
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Joined: October 31st, 2016, 9:32 pm
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Location: Missoula, Montana
We were heading in to do a Little North Fork of the Clearwater multi-day kayak trip in northern Idaho, which has a hideously long, complicated, and remote shuttle, and about thirty miles along we started smelling something burning. Turned out that one of the brakes on one of the pickups we were using for the shuttle was binding. We flagged down a passing logger, who of course had a good tool kit, and removed the brake and bungied it up in the wheel well. Then we drove back to St. Regis, switched the gear from that pickup into one of the other rigs we had left there, and headed out again.

The shuttle is so long and complicated that one of the few feasible ways to do it is to have the shuttle drivers drive with us to the launch site, continue to the takeout, and camp there and get drunk for three or four days until we show up.


Last edited by pmmpete on October 23rd, 2017, 8:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2017, 11:29 pm 
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And as we thought through the events that happened, we realized it could have been way worse. In a short period of time after wards, we could have been on the 401 travelling at 120kph and having to stop fast in bad traffic. This could have been catastrophic. So we are very very lucky the leak appeared while we were travelling at low speed near where we left! Whew!

But yes worse can happen and we probably lucky that we've not had to cancel a trip until now.

AH well. At least we don't have to go to work tomorow. :)


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PostPosted: October 23rd, 2017, 7:23 am 
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Joined: August 19th, 2014, 10:40 am
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Say what! You could fix this yourself for under $100 including tools to do the job and in under a couple of hours or have a shop get it done ASAP! Don't cancel your trip quite yet!!
Or pinch the rear brake line with vice grips and get on your way! Most vehicles have separate sections in the brake fluid reservoir for front/back so if your back starts leaking your front shouldn't fail unless they are leaking too.


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PostPosted: October 23rd, 2017, 10:58 am 
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token60 wrote:
Say what! You could fix this yourself for under $100 including tools to do the job and in under a couple of hours or have a shop get it done ASAP! Don't cancel your trip quite yet!!
Or pinch the rear brake line with vice grips and get on your way! Most vehicles have separate sections in the brake fluid reservoir for front/back so if your back starts leaking your front shouldn't fail unless they are leaking too.


Those are good ideas. But we don't want to mess around with the brake system. It's too late for the trip - unless its a certain length its not worth all the driving etc. Back the brakes, eventually it will need to be repaired so I might as well do it now. sure I could get under there and splice in a piece of pipe, but I'd need a flaring tool and all that. I'd rather just bring it to the shop and get it repaired. They will likely replace the entre line which is a better safer way to do it.

We may look into November for an opportunity to do a trip but it depends on the weather and work schedules. Probably more likely we'll have to call 2017 off and wait until 2018.


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PostPosted: October 23rd, 2017, 2:28 pm 
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Joined: October 4th, 2017, 7:48 am
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Having to cancel a trip for any reason is a bummer. Sorry about your luck.

It's great that you stayed safe, and will likely get the chance to do many more trips in the future.


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PostPosted: October 24th, 2017, 6:26 am 
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Joined: January 27th, 2016, 2:34 pm
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Location: Simcoe County
I can sympathize with this. Car troubles just plain ole suck! As far as trips go, we would do anything to get outdoors. Including getting a lift to Canadian Tire in Parry Sound at 4am just to sit around until they opened! Needless to say we had our pickup fixed and only lost half a day of our week long getaway. Never give up or it becomes a habit! Milan H&H


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PostPosted: October 24th, 2017, 6:52 am 
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Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
Too bad about your trip. I have done some car maint but would never mess with brake repairs either.

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PostPosted: October 24th, 2017, 11:21 pm 
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Joined: October 31st, 2016, 9:32 pm
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Location: Missoula, Montana
A friend and I flew down to Mexico for a couple weeks of multi-day whitewater kayaking with Rocky Contos. As we were driving towards the first river, I heard sounds from the front of Rocky's pickup which I knew from experience were a bearing going out. I persuaded Rocky that if we didn't get the bearing replaced before we started the trip, it was sure to blow out at some highly inconvenient time and place later in the trip. So we stopped in a small town and found a guy who replaced the bearing under a tree in his back yard. It took an afternoon, but the minor delay was worth it.


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PostPosted: October 25th, 2017, 2:45 am 
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Joined: October 31st, 2016, 9:32 pm
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Location: Missoula, Montana
It's better to be smart and well-prepared than it is to be lucky, but when something goes wrong, I don't complain when I get lucky.

We were heading to the launch site for a Jarbidge-Bruneau kayak trip in south central Idaho. The shuttle route includes about 60 miles of remote road which contains a nasty mixture of gumbo clay and sharp rock which causes a lot of flat tires. It rained 2 inches that day. We were driving to the launch site in a pickup which belonged to a lead-footed kid with no sense of caution. He charged down the road throwing up a rooster tail of mud, with the rear of the pickup skidding first one way and then the other as he blasted through the gumbo. I was under the topper with two other guys, lying on top of a pile of gear and trying to keep out from under the leaks in the topper. About halfway to the launch site I started hearing an ominous rumble from the left rear tire. I shouted up to the driver that I thought we were getting a flat. He shouted back that it was just the straps on the roof rack vibrating, or gumbo in the wheel well. The rumble continued, and after a while we smelled burning rubber. We shouted for the driver to stop.

We climbed out out into the driving rain and inspected the tire. It was shredded. We crawled around in the mud, jacked up the pickup, pulled off the flat tire, dragged out the spare, and put it on. When we removed the jack, the spare tire went almost down to the rim. We checked the pressure, and there was only about 8 pounds. The owner of the vehicle had not been checking and maintaining the pressure in his spare.

We stood there in the pounding rain, with the temperature not much above freezing, and with sagebrush disappearing off into the mist in all directions, feeling totally screwed. This was before we started carrying satellite phones, and it could be days before the road dried up enough for somebody to drive along it. The nearest ranch was a long distance away.

But then I remembered that not long before the tire started rumbling, I was peering out of a window of the topper, and through the mud splatters I had seen a camping trailer off in the sagebrush. The ranchers in the area call that kind of thing a cow camp. So a couple of us hiked back down the road to check it out.

When we got to the trailer, we knocked on the door, but nobody was there. Dang. We were still screwed. There was a small stone shed in back of the trailer. I wandered over and looked inside. There was a generator and a compressor. Whoa! What a serious piece of luck! We turned the vehicle around, crawled back to the cow camp on the almost flat tire, cranked up the generator and the compressor, and filled the tire. The shuttle driver was nervous about running the shuttle without a spare. He noticed a couple tires lying under the trailer, and checked them out. They fit the pickup, so he borrowed one and left a note explaining the situation. We completed the drive to the launch site at a much more sedate speed, and the shuttle guy returned the tire when shuttling a subsequent group.

It was really lucky that the tire went flat close to the cow camp, it was really lucky that I noticed the cow camp, and it was even luckier that the cow camp had a generator and a compressor. If the tire had gone flat a few miles earlier, we would have had no idea that the cow camp was nearby. We would have spent a couple of says sitting around in the rain and mud, waiting for somebody to come by and rescue us.


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