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PostPosted: July 30th, 2013, 9:02 am 
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Hm, what's that noise... dunno if this news report has all the facts, the top maps for the trip sure didn't, leaving several waterfalls unmapped and a solo paddler unprepared for a big surprise around the next bend.

Here's the waterfalls on the Again river that was "discovered" by accidentally paddling over the edge... location is south of James Bay, given in a map in the link.

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Canoeist discovers uncharted waterfalls in Canada

Explorer Adam Shoalts hurtles down 12-metre falls on Again river in one of world's remotest areas

Kalyeena Makortoff
The Guardian,
Sunday 28 July 2013 15.27 BST

In an age in which explorers are running out of wildernesses and life has been street-mapped to the ends of the earth, it is a rare moment indeed: the discovery of uncharted waterfalls on a river in a G8 country.

Adam Shoalts was canoeing along a section of the Again river in northern Canada when he found himself hurtling down 12 metres (40ft) into swirling white water. The tumble ruined his boat but piqued his curiosity. The waterfall could well be the largest discovered in Canada in 100 years. Shoalts went on to discover six other falls on the river.

"It's a pretty big deal that you still have unexplored territory in this day and age," said Shoalts, who is now planning to revisit his inadvertent discovery to plot and measure the falls. With financial backing from the Royal Canadian Geographical Society (RCGS), his work will be used to update maps for one of the least explored and most remote areas in the world.

...

Since his first canoe expedition in 2004, Shoalts has uncovered petroglyphs (rock carvings) in British Columbia; spent 40 days cataloguing amphibians in the Amazon; and dodged polar bears on a newly paddled Again tributary that he hopes to name.

"Given the documentation of these waterfalls, we clearly still have gems to be revealed," said Michael Schmidt, the vice-chair of the RCGS expedition committee. "Perhaps it's not to the magnitude of what explorers would have seen 150 years ago. [But] there is still much to be discovered."

Returning to the falls he found last year will be a harrowing one-man journey for Shoalts, harking back to treacherous wildernesses faced by early explorers. The Hudson Bay lowlands are roughly the same size as Britain but with a population density of fewer than one person per 50 sq km.

Without adequate landing for float planes, reaching the Again's headwaters means skirting the dangerous Kattawagami river, which claimed a canoeist's life in 2006, paddling upstream against Shoalts's unnamed tributary and carrying a boat through the world's third largest wetland.

"I used to say that canoeing the river is the easy part because you have to go through such a nightmare to actually reach the thing," he said. "I guess that's the reason these areas … have been passed over or skipped."

But old mapping techniques share the blame, Schmidt explained. Our knowledge of the Again's topography, like that of much of Canada, relies on aerial photographs from the 1960s. The Geological Survey of Canada, responsible for topographic updates, will add Shoalts's plotted waterfalls pending verification from Spot satellite imagery.

"There's still a lot of work left to be done. That's reality," said Shoalts. "Canada's so vast. Even if I do this the rest of my life, all my work would still only be a drop in the bucket."


http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/j ... lls-canada

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PostPosted: July 30th, 2013, 9:29 am 
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So, instead of being in the running for a Darwin award, he gets financially rewarded by the RCGS?

Wonders never cease.

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PostPosted: July 30th, 2013, 10:39 am 
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...heh, heh...

I'm sure he was thinking as the bow plunged down towards those jagged rocks waiting below... hot damn, what luck! This is finally gonna get me some recognition! Bring it on!

:rofl:

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PostPosted: July 30th, 2013, 10:44 am 
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There's video of his falls at the 1:21 mark


http://adamshoalts.com/expeditions/again_river_waterfall_expedition

You'd think on a uncharted river you'd take the extra time to get out of your boat and carefully scout every set of rapids, because you know... they're uncahrted.
I'd love to do this sort of thing, safely... where's my grant?!? :lol:

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PostPosted: July 30th, 2013, 11:44 am 
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This story has been making the creeker rounds,,,,
mostly because of the drops, this one compared to many is not bad and fairly straight forward.
The Creekers are getting all excited about new drops... :roll:
Most of the canoeists that paddle the far north can point out huge numbers of waterfalls.
I posted back that one of these days you guys are going to "discover" Algoma,,, 8)
At least he is getting his story in print which is a hard thing for a Canadian to do.
(HIs was from England)
The majority of prints and internet story "news" service use antique images, or images that have nothing to do with where it happened.
The Star ran the same cottage image for the "Hawks" property sale and a another story on cottage country the other day.
And most sites are worse.
Judging by the pic posted there does not seem to be any fast water appraoching the drop, no canyon walls,,,
So missing the horizon line..... makes for a nice story and keeps the legend of how rough wilderness tripping is.

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PostPosted: July 30th, 2013, 12:15 pm 
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This person was not so lucky. The woman managed to jump ship before going over - I presume she was in the bow and saw it coming.

http://www.caledonenterprise.com/news-s ... -in-alton/


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PostPosted: July 30th, 2013, 8:57 pm 
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Heard this story on NPR and had to check out the locale since I've paddled the James Bay lowlands. Looks like the put-in was down the end of Gold mine detour road near the airstrip either out of Cochrane or Iroquois Falls. Can't figure how it took a week to get to some paddle-able water. Looks a little overloaded with gear for a solo paddler. Got to give him credit for finding a new route though getting dropped over a falls is a newbie move. Almost did that myself soloing the Wak on my first. Be nice if he wrote a trip report.

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PostPosted: July 30th, 2013, 9:20 pm 
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Here's another report...


Quote:
Canadian explorer accidentally discovers uncharted waterfall on remote river

Adam Shoalts went over a waterfall and almost destroyed his canoe, but he also made history

Ishmael N. Daro
Published: July 29, 2013, 9:56 am

Canadian explorer Adam Shoalts can brag about something few others can: he discovered a waterfall.

Shoalts stumbled, or rather tumbled, into the discovery in 2012 while canoeing down the Again River in northern Quebec, which no explorer had ever attempted. Although the discovery happened a year ago, a report by the Guardian on Monday highlights just what a rare and impressive achievement it was.


As he wrote on the Canadian Geographic website at the time, it took Shoalts “nearly a week of bushwacking and dragging my canoe up creeks to reach the river’s isolated headwaters.” On his second day travelling down the Again, Shoalts went over some rapids and soon realized he had gotten himself into a pickle.

From the blog post:

The next thing I knew the river had disappeared in front of me: it was a vertical drop. A WATERFALL! In a flash, I plunged over another rapid, then for a heart-stopping second, my canoe hovered right on the brink of the fall as the bow edged into the open air. In the next instant, I felt myself fling forward, catching a glimpse of my canoe flipping upside down in the drop as I toppled out and hit the water. I was sucked down beneath the fall, thinking to myself: “great, I’ve survived the drop… but shouldn’t I have reached the surface by now?” Then after what seemed like an eternity my head finally broke free of the river and I breathed in a living-giving gulp of air.

Shoalts’s canoe was badly damaged and he lost his hat, but it may have been worth it. He had, after all, just inadvertently discovered a 12-metre waterfall — likely the largest waterfall discovered in 100 years.

“It’s a pretty big deal that you still have unexplored territory in this day and age,” Shoalts told the Guardian. “Many organizations are just sponsoring athletic contests, like going to the north pole… routes and journeys that have been done many times before.”

Shoalts ultimately discovered seven waterfalls on the Again River, and he’s going back in 2013 to properly map out his discoveries, with help from the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. A teaser video for the expedition was released on YouTube July 8.


http://o.canada.com/2013/07/29/adam-sho ... discovery/

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PostPosted: July 30th, 2013, 10:00 pm 
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Well since his gear isn't lashed in early in the movie, where is the gear in the flip, don't see any gear in the eddie....
and with the gar that high it would be awful hard to do a cross bow....
Makes for a good story though.
Jeff

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PostPosted: August 6th, 2013, 7:30 am 
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Well, this discoverer is having a good time - sort of like Kevin Callan just more of an authority when talking to the press ;-)

The Star has a few more tidbits http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013 ... alone.html

I just wished that folks would go back to the FN names when requesting geographical names in "discovered" rivers...

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PostPosted: August 6th, 2013, 8:13 am 
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Just think of all the "discoveries" we've made over the years Erhard..... :lol:
All that stuff that is never listed on topo maps.....
Maybe I should push my canoe over Agawa falls and go oops..... 8)
I mean it isn't on the topo maps....
But I have found if you dig a little deeper the early mappers/trades and so on knew of every little spot. and the detail was amazing.
So the most you can truly say is you "re-found" it. except for some creek paddlers looking for some first descents, but then again some of those guys have found out we where running the "easy" ones in the seventies
(face book link)
1977 a younger bolder me.....
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid ... =1&theater
Some of the younger guys posted a pic a few days ago on FB from the early "90's" and called it old school, ..... :-?
I replied what does that make us children of the "70's" :o :oops:
and even more those dinosaurs from the 50's and 60's...... :rofl:
So what is new is actually old and, well probably been done by someone....
Jeff

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PostPosted: August 6th, 2013, 8:40 am 
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If the only reference I used for my trips was the Canadian 1:50 topos, I would have "discovered" a few new waterfalls and rapids. I think some of those photographs from 1927 that most of the topos are based on were shot during low water.


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PostPosted: August 6th, 2014, 7:40 pm 
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I looked for critical news articles of Shoalts' neo-colonial version of exploration and could only find this:

http://www.nationnews.ca/geographer-dis ... territory/

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