View topic - Rescue technique - useful for big lakes.

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PostPosted: December 18th, 2016, 11:35 am 
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Saw this posted on the paddleworld face book page.

Good idea for those planning on paddling the big lakes and the rocky shores encountered there.
Would also work with canoe if all your gear is strapped in properly.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tlx5vHT6hzs

Jeff

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PostPosted: December 18th, 2016, 5:39 pm 
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Hmmm....I would be curious to see if this would work with a much heavier canoe in rough conditions. My guess is that one would end up pulling the rescue boat into the rocks, rather than pulling the flipped canoe away from shore. This is partly why rope assisted rescues are not attempted from boats in whitewater, but instead from shore.

I hope the 'clip' part of this rescue involves a quick release harness.


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PostPosted: December 18th, 2016, 6:08 pm 
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It gets down to conditions, skill level of those involved.
Of the conditions I saw on Superior in October, it would not work.
Just another quiver in the skills dept.
There are locations I know of where a rope from shore would not be feasible.
Hopefully a judgement call of getting off the water before exposing oneself or a group would be made.
Hopefully seeing how difficult it is in these teaching videos will open a few eyes.
Jeff

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PostPosted: December 18th, 2016, 7:21 pm 
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Surf scares me a bit - I've neither paddled nor swum in it enough to understand how to stay safe in it. I have swum to shore in whitewater holding a throw bag or long line attached to a canoe, and pendulumed the boat in below me when I had my feet on solid bottom, but when a swim is likely to have bad consequences I prefer to be in a boat I can roll reliably.


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PostPosted: December 19th, 2016, 9:34 am 
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I big issue I see right now is there are a lot of people and small groups that have never been exposed to the various rescue groups/courses that are available.
Not just big lake/ocean paddling but WW also.
There are some very good videos on line,
also some very bad ones.
Just making the good ones a little easy to find is a good start and if someone who has not developed the skills for rescue is inspired to research a little more it is good for our activity.
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: December 19th, 2016, 8:12 pm 
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Thanks for sharing a good video.
The paddler in the water played a key role in helping with the rescue--securing his paddle and swimming out with a tether attached to his kayak.
The rescue boat encouraged the swimmer, stayed in contact with the swimmer,and performed a quick empty and reentry.
The second rescue kayak quickly secured a tow and helped to pull the boats to safer water/location.
Overall, safe, quick and in control. They look like pros.

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PostPosted: December 23rd, 2016, 11:53 pm 
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That guy swimming his boat out is a strong swimmer to tow a kayak in a drysuit. That is tough even for that short distance. I would be more inclined to pay out a longer rope before having to tow or the rescue boat to throw him a line so that he could reel himself in. Like anything, it is a good idea to do something positive and get moving before it gets worse. I like the towing boat heading out to try to keep the rescue boat from going in. Another tool in the tool box is always good. Cheers!


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