View topic - Older trippers - How to get out there and enjoy it.

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PostPosted: December 21st, 2016, 6:26 pm 
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Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
jedi jeffi wrote:
There is a group of us on facebook if you are in Ontario.
Called "old lazy paddlers"
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1215371221816222/
and no there still hasn't been a meet up.... :roll:
but I have paddled with a few.

Jeff



I just joined that group but it looks like it's just WW stuff.

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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2016, 9:33 am 
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Wotrock said
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I just joined that group but it looks like it's just WW stuff.


It is never to late to start...... 8)

And some are now more looking for easier stuff (day type trips)
And some like me can no longer sit in a kayak.....
And some I will have to coerce into trips...
But most are past the days of big stuff.
especially in colder weather.

Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2016, 9:43 am 
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I'll pass.

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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2016, 9:51 am 
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Location: Hamilton ON
It is mostly about having reasonable expectations.


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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2016, 12:34 pm 
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Location: Vassalboro , Maine usa
Littleredcanoe - best wishes on the knee. I don't see anyway to do much training until you are further along in rehab.

I am 68. The emotional/spiritual fulfillment of being in the deep woods hasn't lessened a bit as the years have passed. My strength and endurance has gone down. I feel fine on trips, but I am nowhere nearly as strong and resilient as when I was in my 30s.

I train with weights and a bicycle. That conditioning is very important to feeling comfortable (no really sore muscles) after a few days on the water. As noted in other posts, picking routes with no or minimal portaging is important. Portaging takes a noticeably bigger toll on me than it used to.

Also, I recommend more attention to diet. Take a good cooler. Eat steak and fresh vegetables. Eat a good breakfast with bacon and eggs. Good nutrition makes you feel much better about the 3rd day out. Start late. Stop early. Plan shorter routes. I think 4 to 6 hours a day on the water is about right for our age group.

Lastly, bring boxed wine and stop early, ward off dehydration by drinking half a liter a person before supper.

Frankr


Last edited by Frankr on December 22nd, 2016, 8:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2016, 5:57 pm 
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
It's coming. I can do 30 min on stationary bike without knee ballooning up

And what was I thinking. Laps at the Maine Mall today


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PostPosted: December 23rd, 2016, 4:06 am 
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Location: Fairbanks AK
I'm a 78 y/o solo paddler in the nwt. Back is so bad I can't straighten up to carry my canoe. But I can drag it easily. I cover parts that hit the ground with duct tape and all is well. I carry everything else in packs. I set heavy packs in a high place, wriggle into them and with a lot of effort get as upright as I can get and start walking. I'd rather try and fail than not try at all. It's better to spend time than make time. So training hard so I can paddle rapidly is senseless.

Douglas


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PostPosted: December 23rd, 2016, 8:00 am 
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Location: Connecticut
Still getting out there at 68. The canoes ground and portages all seem heavier, harder and longer. Even the drive to northern Ontario tales 2 days when it used to take 1.

Using a small wall tent/wood stove really helps to keep me active in the shoulder season,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fa5mBL9JZS8&t=40s

After some medical issues the last two years I changed my plans from a 6 day river trip to an easy 6 day lake trip, and the change in mind came at the first portage. Sitting around a campsite on a beautiful lake is a pretty good alternate when the body tells you to slow down
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXge8AB5Zu4&t=15s


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PostPosted: December 23rd, 2016, 8:46 am 
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At 65, I suffered a TIA (mini-stroke) in August while picking blueberries. No lasting effects, thank God. Probable cause was identified as a PFO (a hole between 2 chambers in the heart) But the solution of the doc at the hospital was to put me "permanently" on a particular blood thinner (Xarelto) that would make it dangerous to go far into the wilderness because of potential uncontrolled bleeding from any injury.

In September I successfully raced in the Adirondack 90-mile canoe race anyway. But among other major life stye change issues, that drug would put me out of the running for a planned return to the 440 mile Yukon River Quest in 2017. I honestly can't remember the last time I ever lost a single drop of blood while paddling, but the wife (my pit crew) had different thoughts on my outdoor and wilderness adventure activities.

It so happens that 2 members of my canoe team are cardiac surgical operating room assistants at a different hospital, and they quickly got me in to see the surgeon they work for to do an assessment for a surgical fix. So I went for it, and I am now at the end of my 4-6 week recovery period, already working out on my paddling machine and weight lifting. Yukon, here I come.


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PostPosted: December 23rd, 2016, 9:38 am 
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ffdjmsaid

Quote:
So training hard so I can paddle rapidly is senseless.


I guess training is a bad word... for some
But for others it was just a thought I wanted to plant in their heads so that they can try a figure a way to get out.
For you if you are getting out and doing a lot of paddling it is great!
The Fact you don't consider is training is perfect and to enjoy still getting out is even better.
But as mentioned some of us that are tied to the urban life style we need some motivation to be active because sometimes it is hard to get a close place to just go paddling.
So whether it is physio, walking, local hikes or paddle at the local conservation area, it is all good.
The idea is to get the knowledge of what gets us out there to the rest of the paddling community.
Whether it is lightening the loads of the packs, different routes or various exercise regimes, just like paddles or boats all will be different and work for different people.
I have sitting issues (and will forever) from breaking my tailbone off at the base of my spine. So I can no longer sit in a kayak (or any soft seat for that matter)
So physio exercises, walking, yoga is all part of what I have to do.
Since wotrock mentioned last year about his condition I have added clotting sponges to my first aid kit because I travel occasionally with others with the same problem.
It was something before his post I had never looked into.

So we all keep learning, and if we can help each other out it is good.

I think the hardest trick will be convincing some young Sherpas to give up their valuable free time to help out some "older paddlers" on longer more remote (but easier) trips.
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: December 23rd, 2016, 10:17 am 
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Nessmuk - :clap:

Robin great idea, I have think I will downsize my winter tent for that.
I have used the stove before, it sure does save on the amount of wood you actually use and the heat is a lot better!

Another reason I started this thread that in all the paddle mags/blogs/facebook/twitter... :roll: out there, there is very little useful info, not only for us that still do it, but those that are faced with the decision of having to give it up.

I know if it wasn't for my exped 8 mattress I would have cut down on trips long ago.
(arthritis in the hips, another reason for constant maintenance)

Like those who have posted in this thread I love being out there, and the more tips I can try the better.

Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: December 31st, 2016, 10:27 am 
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:-? Welll you never know what is going to happen...
Playing hockey crashed into another guy... would have been better if I had fallen down instead of him..
So now have a tear in the muscles lower back that connect to the butt.... 8)
I have always felt for people with back pain since I broke my tail bone off and have had sitting issues ever since....
Well now much worse,
but doc says it was a good thing I was in shape, it should be less time in the recovery.....
As long as I don't overdo stuff......
What me....... :oops:
Well we will see how this plays out
I will be a good test subject.... well maybe not... you do get cranky when you are uncomfortable....
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: December 31st, 2016, 10:39 am 
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Tough luck Jeff. Take it easy and hopefully all will be well by ice-out time.


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PostPosted: December 31st, 2016, 11:39 am 
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Location: Alvinston, Ontario Canada
I can certainly relate to this thread. 35 years ago a group of us started paddling together. It became an annual spring event and we called ourselves the Derelict Canoe Club. 6 of us paddled together for about 30 years then some of the guys started to drop out for a variety of reasons. This year there was just 2 of us and my buddy announced that it was his last trip. It wasn't unexpected but it was still a shock that a 35 year tradition was over - well not quite. By next paddling season I'll only be a 74 year old youngster who still intends to paddle somewhere whether solo or with new paddler(s). Too stubborn to quit I guess, but also I can't imagine not getting out on the water in secluded areas of Ontario. The real problem is where to paddle that is remote, not too many portages and still accessible by vehicle. Over the past 4 or 5 decades I've paddled many of the rivers in Northern & NE Ont. Most have rapids and portages that I probably couldn't safely handle today. So if anyone has any suggestions for a 4-5 night trip in a remote setting, please share it. Thanks.


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PostPosted: December 31st, 2016, 1:23 pm 
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Well if you time it right and the weather forecast is good a base camp on Lake Superior. (several locations)
Also you can get a water taxi from wawa to the south end of Pukaswaska for a base camp
Same for the Slate Islands.

Several in Lake Superior P.P.
http://www.lakesuperiorpark.ca/index.php/canoe-routes
I would say Mijinemungshing Lake, car access and very remote with lots of day trips available.
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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