View topic - Older trippers - How to get out there and enjoy it.

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PostPosted: December 31st, 2016, 2:26 pm 
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Joined: June 21st, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Alvinston, Ontario Canada
Paddling Lake Superior has been one of my favourite trips. I've paddled from Pukaskwa NP to Sandy Beach in Michipicoten Harbour many times; several of them solo. Also the stretch from Old Woman Bay to Agawa Bay. Strangely the trip we did this year (2016) was originally planned out of Gargantua Harbour but the winds on the big pond (Superior) were of life threatening magnitude. We did a plan B trip into Mijinemungshing Lake for a few days. Nice lake that I've paddled across previously but I prefer to have set starting and finishing points - a destination with stops along the way; and fewer other paddlers. I'm familiar with the Wawa area having worked there for 12 years last century. I think my ideal trip would be down a relatively remote river with only minor rapids and short or no portages. But then the Yukon River is too far from home here in SW Ontario. But I can dream and who knows.........?


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PostPosted: February 2nd, 2017, 4:04 pm 
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Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
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Location: Milton
So let's get back at'er 8)
I have already had my first paddle of the year down the Credit, and we treated it as a float, and the younger guy even offered and carried my canoe to the truck.... which I graciously accepted! :thumbup:

My back is now back... so to speak, still a little weak in some of the exercises but coming along nicely.

For those who have not yet begun to get ready it is a great time to start because it will take you away from all that silly :evil: :evil: :evil: that is going on and that is a great bonus! :thumbup:

Just remember it will take 4 to 6 weeks before you see any real improvement, and by that time we should have some more "soft" water in some areas.

If you are older, try to find someone that works with arthritis patients, I only say that because they seem to be little more flexible in adapting the exercises.

If you want to DIY here is not a bad site and pretty simple to follow.
http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-ar ... ga/videos/

Don't be embarrassed about using a stretching aid to keep your balance of some of the exercises. (wall, chairs, trekking poles) it is more important to gently stretch things out instead of worrying trying to keep your balance. It will come around (slowly.... :-? )

A good flexibility program is for much more than getting ready for paddling. One of the outside paddling benefits is it will make it easier to check your blind spots when driving.

Breathing during stretching and activity is really important, there is a vid on the above site that shows this.
Back in the day when I competed I found it very beneficial, in a competitive situation, having controlled relaxed breathing is very important, it saves a ton of energy and having some extra energy at the end of a day makes a trip that much more enjoyable. Especially if conditions or portages of the day have taken their toll.

Also start getting out to hike using trekking poles, it will get you breathing and using the poles will work your arms a bit and supply some balance.

Jeff
(my cat and dog stretches still are not back to the kitten and puppy stage yet :oops: )

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: February 2nd, 2017, 4:14 pm 
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Location: Newmarket, Ontario Canada
glad you are moving AND getting out! Is that what that noise was that I could hear in the wind from my SW? :) thank you very much for the website link. Informative and useful. Already went through a few, and will incorporate it into my daily routine! Had a shot of cortisone in the knee (couldn't stand the pain and swelling any longer) and it feels mostly better, just not stable. The stretching and strengthing regime on the site should compliment what I am doing at he gym nicely!

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PostPosted: March 29th, 2017, 9:13 pm 
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Location: Milton
Well we got a couple of the small GTA lakes open now.
Even though I was back up to snuff, hiking, carrying and hockey
When I went for my first paddle the paddling connecter muscles have put up some resistance..... :o
Paddled a very easy pace of about 5km
So it will take a while.
Went for the 2nd 5km today, a little better, again easy pace all technique work.
The trick will be to get some good weather so I can get a build up in k's before my first trip in a couple of weeks.
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2017, 8:12 am 
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Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
We are ready.. But as GTA is south of us...we are looking at ice fishing still.. Maine trips are iffy before mid May as ice out is about then in the Moosehead region. Our ice will go out mid April.. every year about five to seven days ahead of Canoe Lake.

Wish I could practice paddling on new knee..instead of going snowshoeing.. Another up to 60 cm snow due in the next two days.


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PostPosted: April 16th, 2017, 1:13 pm 
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I find it interesting that other recreational pursuits spend a good portion of time in preparation and some people spending a lot of money for "pleasure" of working hard.
The idea here was not to solicit for funds but to share the info to get out there so you can enjoy paddling and tripping a whole lot more.

So I am up to only about 75k's right now but things are feeling pretty good, up to 6 k's in just over an hour and now doing a bit of Fartlek training.

I always enjoyed this kind of interval training even when I raced, and the beauty is you can just go as you feel but the training effect is real on how it will help you get into shape.
This from Runners world, It is a good simple explanation of it.

Quote:
Fartlek Workouts are not only fun to say out loud, but they're fun to run. Fartlek is Swedish for "speed play," and that is exactly what it’s all about. Unlike tempo and interval work, fartlek is unstructured and alternates moderate-to-hard efforts with easy throughout. After a warmup, you play with speed by running at faster efforts for short periods of time (to that tree, to the sign) followed by easy-effort running to recover. It’s fun in a group setting as you can alternate the leader and mix up the pace and time. And in doing so, you reap the mental benefits of being pushed by your buddies through an unpredictable workout. The goal is to keep it free-flowing so you’re untethered to the watch or a plan, and to run at harder efforts but not a specific pace.

Benefits: Stress-free workout that improves mind-body awareness, mental strength, and stamina.


Remember this just doesn't mean to "haul A$$" at the speed portions.
Just quicken the tempo it can be 30 secs, it can be 5 minutes.
Active rest is a major key, don't just stop, slow down and keep the whole process at a comfortable level for you.

Also it is good to get out in various conditions, today it was warm with some fairly strong wind gusts with the waves at Kelso about 1.5 ft and whitecaps.
What makes kelso a good prep place and the vain of wind surfers is that you get strange wind gust directions because of the Escarpment.
This I did find challenging with my lower back muscles which is really good to know with my first trip of the year 5 days away.

Knowing your limitations is key to a safe enjoyable trip, (or if you are even ready)

If you have any questions I will do my best to answer them.

Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: April 16th, 2017, 5:17 pm 
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
I'm not ready. I paddle to paddle. The ice might be out in a week.. When you have one new joint replacement and need six more your attitude changes.

We will start on the ocean.. Portages might be out. My doc said no twisting nor coming down hard on the leg. I tried hiking up a 100 meter cliff in .2 miles yesterday > The Stone stairs are too tall for my replaced knee.

Getting older sometimes means mentally adjusting.


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PostPosted: April 16th, 2017, 6:24 pm 
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Joined: June 22nd, 2004, 4:45 pm
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Location: Canmore AB
Great topic. At 66 I've had to throttle back on the long expeditions. Even took up sailing when a bad back threatened any type of active canoeing.
My take on this is getting lighter read, more expensive, equipment.

The other thing is I've started going to the gym in the past two years. Never went before and like LRC, I said why would I want to waste time there?
Due to injuries and and losing muscle mass I started doing Pilates and Yoga. Both made a huge difference in core strength and flexibility.
A bunch of our friends were going to a local gym taking a boot camp/ crossfit style class. Focus is spread over aerobic, core strength (small muscles), muscle strength and endurance. You can modify each exercise and go as hard/easy as you need.
With great trepidation I gave it a try.
To my amazement I liked it and now go 3x/week in Shoulder season and 2x/week during ski season. If I'm in town in the summer I go when I can.
It's made a huge difference in my activity level and energy. With the yoga and Pilates knowledge i know what exercises to do when I'm travelling.
Bottom line is we all lose muscle mass as we age. The testosterone levels sink out of sight. Take time for yourself! Do something about it!

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"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover."
M.T.


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PostPosted: April 16th, 2017, 11:17 pm 
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Joined: July 5th, 2004, 12:55 am
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Anyone her have an opinion/do on any benefits or not of nordic walking sticks?


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2017, 5:48 am 
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The great advantage of walking poles are on the uphills. I once met a Mt Washington local climbing Mt Washington using cross country ski poles. We were resting on a ledge and seen him come up behind us. With the help of the poles he was using his upper body muscles to propel himself uphill at a tremendous pace using fairly long strides. Says he climbed from the main parking lot to the top every weekday day and took the bus back down. He was 75 years old at the time and was certainly the fitness person of that age I have ever met. It was a warm day and he was wearing a T shirt and shorts. Only his face hinted at his age. Said he spent his winters on cross country racing skis.

I would not power walk with poles on the flats as it may cause over striding resulting in injuries. Plus there is not enough resistance on the flats to be of any benefit for your upper body.

GG

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PostPosted: April 17th, 2017, 4:34 pm 
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Re: benefits of using trekking poles.

Not sure if this is what you had in mind - i.e. for hiking with or without a pack - but it goes through the reasons why trekking poles are worth using -

http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/a/11089/T ... king-Poles

Of course, you need to know how to use them for them to be effective. I followed a couple of older women this morning while walking my dog and both of them had poles that were set about a foot too long for them. They just kinda dragged them along as they walked - doing their Nordic walking thing!

When I first saw trekking poles on the trails above Chamonix in France in the late 1990's I laughed at the wussy Euros and their summertime ski poles. I soon learned that they can really make a difference - both up and maybe even more going down. My knees are much better off thanks to those Leki poles!

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PostPosted: April 17th, 2017, 6:01 pm 
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Location: Hamilton ON
We have never taken them on a canoe trip. However I have often used them on long hikes on rough (especially rocky) ground. They help on both uphill and down. I particularly like how they help with balance on steep declines.
I often find though that on level smooth ground they are used as true_north described- just kinda dragged along.
I like to carry my map and compass while bushwhacking and then I can only use one pole.


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2017, 6:14 pm 
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Location: Milton
What Ghoslo and True_north said.
:thumbup:

And yes I take them on canoe trips because I hike too!
Great for bush wacking but make sure you have the small baskets on so they don't sink too far.

I too believe that the training prep has to based on an individuals abilities and health concerns....
And that covers a ton of area.
The trick is to find/try something that works and is of benefit to improving ones level of fitness so they can get out and still enjoy!

Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2017, 9:22 pm 
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Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
jeddi jeffi wrote:
Quote:
The idea here was . . . to share the info [for aging paddlers] to . . . enjoy paddling and tripping a whole lot more.
While not attempting to pirate this thread, I am compelled to point out that the average age of participants in Wabakimi Project volunteer reconnaissance expeditions annually exceeds 67 years.

To aging paddlers who've lost partners and are in search of an opportunity to explore a virtually-roadless wilderness area of Northwestern Ontario, I extend an invitation to join one of our Wabakimi Project volunteer trips. See our separate post, Wabakimi 2017 - An Invitation to Participate on this site.


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2017, 10:38 pm 
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Voyageur Wrote:
Quote:
While not attempting to pirate this thread,


Perfect just a great example of what older folks can do.
The idea is to encourage those that are not as "seasoned" as some of us that they can work towards a very satisfying paddling experience.

As we know you can get away with "stuff" when you are younger.

Like all activities not knowing is a hinderance.

Thanks for posting the average ages!

Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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