View topic - Thunderbox / Privy Plans

It is currently November 11th, 2019, 4:17 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 82 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

Do you dread having to use the Thunderbox?
Absolutely. 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
It isn't so bad 45%  45%  [ 28 ]
I rather enjoy it. 55%  55%  [ 34 ]
Total votes : 62
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 7th, 2003, 12:56 pm 
Anonymous wrote:
20 years of canoeing and I've never stayed at a site that had a Thunder Box. Either I'm paddling in the wrong places or the perfect places. You guys should really try paddling some more remote areas...while you guys are enjoying these fancy thrones, I'll be out fishing/exploring.
:P

Just kick the duff away and dig a hole...Thunder Box eh...how long do you guys stay at a site for anyway that would warrant putting one of these terd houses in?

Jim George
SS Marie


Jim, it's not the length of stay it's the number of users. The reason for ThunderBoxes is to contain the waste to one specific spot which is maintained. In a heavily used campsite there could be anywhere from one to nine people using it every day in the summer peak period. Without some control just think of the mess. Or even it everyone did dig a hole how long would it be before the area is nothing but a whole hole of holes. :D In more remote areas with fewer visitors of course it isn't necessary. Digging a hole makes perfect sense. It may make a bit of difference if you know this particular campsite is on a very small island. There is nothing wrong with the reason for and use of ThunderBoxes.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 7th, 2003, 1:01 pm 
Point taken Donny. I suppose I've just been spoiled paddling in remote areas. I suppose you have a good point.

Jim


Top
  
 
PostPosted: August 7th, 2003, 1:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: December 25th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 57
Location: Richmond Hill, Ontario Canada
Just having some back from Temagami, I agree 100% with Donny. Some of the campsites we stayed at were VERY high use, and the woods behind them were quite disgusting. The problem would be alleviated a little if everyone would at least attempt to 'dig and bury' - but the unfortunate reality is that a lot of people obviously don't. Going back into the woods behind the campsites was like going through a minefield - rather challenging after dark. This was in late July - I wonder what these sites will be like at the end of August?

Some of the sites that we stayed on DID have a thunderbox - and the woods behind these were much better. It's got to be better for the environment to contain this 'stuff' in one place rather than having it scattered around. Of course, we still saw things like plastic bags thrown into the thunderbox...

I'd love to do something to make the situation in Temagami better. Does anyone know whether it's possible to donate some $$ to organizations that would look after putting thunderboxes in? Some of the sites with them had signs indicating corporate sponsors of the thunderboxes on the site. I meant to look more closely at one of these signs to see if some 'Friends of Temagami' type group was involved - but the last few sites we stayed at didn't have a thunderbox (no signs) - so I never found out.

Sky


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 7th, 2003, 2:34 pm 
[quote="Anonymous"]Point taken Donny. I suppose I've just been spoiled paddling in remote areas. I suppose you have a good point.

Jim[/quote

Actually Jim, for being spoiled it's probably the other way around! :oops: ]


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 7th, 2003, 4:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: May 22nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1431
Location: Brampton, Ontario Canada
Unfortunately, some people do not want or maybe they are to scared to enter the bush to use a thunderbox. I realize that many people are scared of the dark and going into the bush at night. The problem I have with these people is that if they are so scared of the dark or the bush at night (maybe a bear in the bush or maybe even a rabbit, Ha!Ha!) Then these people should not be on a canoe trip. I have found human waste as little and a few meters from a thunder box and the people did not use it or as close to camp as only a few feet from the fire pit. I have also found female products wrappers and tube five to 10 feet from the fire pit or tenting area at sites that had a thunderbox. Ladies take along ziplock bags and place you garbage in it and carry it out or burn it in your next fire and do the same thing with the waste paper you use. Guys, I am not going to let you off because most canoeist are guys they are the worst offenders. If there is a thunderbox on site, and you mit have to look for it, use it at least when you have to sit. If there is no thunderbox on site carry a shovel with you and walk at least 50 to 100 meter from the site and dig a hole at least one foot deep and 3 feet long and one foot wide for your group for a overnight stay. Everyone that uses it covers up thier own waste and before leaving fill in the un-used protion and make it trace free. Be considerate to the people coming in behind you. This also goes for areas used at portages.
Bill


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 7th, 2003, 7:36 pm 
The problem I have with these people is that if they are so scared of the dark or the bush at night (maybe a bear in the bush or maybe even a rabbit, Ha!Ha!) Then these people should not be on a canoe trip

Hillbilly you are soooo macho...you must be a real blast to paddle with. You mentioned to me earlier about only saying something "constructive" when I post...OK, here it goes., yet every time you get on here you ooze male bravado....the ole "nobody is tougher than me thing is getting dull...I have never backed down from a fight is too.... my grampa tought me in West Virginia how to "wrastle" bears. Look, I'm sure you're a swell guy but for heavens sake pull those grapfruits out of your armpits, deflate your chest and be real for a few posts will ya. Gawd!
Scott
Thunder Bay
33 years old
Teacher
Avid Paddler
Knows Wabakimi/Albany Very Well
Prefers to paddle to Crown Land


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 7th, 2003, 10:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: May 22nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1431
Location: Brampton, Ontario Canada
I have placed my Avatar. Hope you like it and do not care if you do not.

Scott , Guest,
Quote:
Hillbilly you are soooo macho...you must be a real blast to paddle with.
I do not think I am macho. I just know what I am doing. Old saying, "Ye thou I walk through the valley of the shadow of death I fear no Evil, because I am the meanest" son-of-a-bit## in the valley.
Quote:
my grampa tought me in West Virginia how to "wrastle" bears.
Since I never said that you do not know what you are saying. My grandfather never wrestled a bear and niether have I. Also, learn to spell taught and wrestle.You said you are a teacher. I am glad you did not teach my three sons English and spelling. I am an educated person but I am wondering about you. If you are trying to make fun of my heritage then that would be discrimination. That is another reason why I am glad you do not teach my children and why you should not be teaching anyones children. I know many teachers and none of them would say something like that. Maybe it is because you are from "Tunder Bay".
Until you know me you do not have the right to say how I am. What I write is the way I am and the way I live my life. Scott, canoe with me for a week and you will find out that I am a nice guy that has the experience and the knowledge that I say I have and I am sure we could be friends. I do what I say and say what I do. I pull no punches and only give punches when deserved. I am a straight up person and what you see is what you get. I would like to meet you on a trip and then you could find out.
You said you are thirty-three years old; thirty-five years ago last June, I graduated from high school. Thirty-three years ago I had already served my 13 months in Viet Nam and had seen HELL in the jungles. Nothing could be worse. If you think I am "MACHO" then so be it. After that nothing has scared me or made me afraid of anything. I was scared there and nothing can compare with that. After being scared SHI#LESS, nothing else can hold a candle to it. Now take up my challenge. I will be going out again next year in the Temagami area. By the way I canoe with a native canadian from the area that was born and raised on his ancestrial lands and we will be canoeing thier.
Have a nice day.
Bill
Keep the sunny side up and watch for rocks!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 8th, 2003, 6:20 am 
Well you snared me with a few typos Hillbilly, and you're right I should have revised my post..However, the "wrastle" was a play on your words not my own. And please correct me if I'm wrong, but are you challenging me to a bar type brawl in the bush? In Temagami? LOL
I'm splitting a gut... (although probably not as many guts split by you Billy in 'Nam right?
I'm done.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 8th, 2003, 7:41 am 
I just re-read your post HillBilly...I apologize for my hot tempered words. Disregard my last post.
Scott


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 8th, 2003, 12:02 pm 
Offline

Joined: December 25th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 57
Location: Richmond Hill, Ontario Canada
I'm glad some apologies were posted. It's kinda sad to see a topic as benign as thunderboxes degenerate...

Hillbilly - do you really think it's just a fear of the woods or of the dark? Could be - I'm sure that it exists. But do you think it could also be partially a disrespect for the wilderness? It seems that a lot of the people who have grown up in our 'disposable' world have this 'I'm going out to conquer the wilderness attitude' . Take people who litter in parks and break beer bottles on steet corners and let them go out into the woods (and they do) ... will they have any more respect for the wilderness (or semi-wilderness), and/or for the next camper that might come along than they do for the park behind their house? I don't know... it's just a thought...

While skiing in Whistler a few years ago - I heard a man say to his wife (who wanted to take a pit stop) "You should be a man - for men - the world is our toilet". Everyone - take note - wash those blueberries that you pick around the campsite VERY thoroughly before you eat them!

By the way - 'feminine products' were quite the eyesore at some campsites as well. I'm a female - and the thought of leaving anything like that behind me in the woods is gross. I can't imagine what goes through the minds of those who do...

Thunderboxes might not be a solution to ALL of the human waste around campsites - but from what I could see in Temagami - the sites that had them were in much better shape.

Sky


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 8th, 2003, 12:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 7513
Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
Sky-B wrote:
... I can't imagine what goes through the minds of those who do...
Sky
The most likely answer - and that holds true for pobably all such environmental misdeeds - is "Nothing"....

By the way, the current ORCA magazine, called Portage, has a pretty comprehensive article "The Scoop on Poop" by Adrienne Montgomerie - well done, Adrienne! Maybe you can post it here...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 8th, 2003, 1:19 pm 
I like to sum it up into one word, respect. Respect for nature, respect for fellow human beings. Which many, many, MANY people don't have.

As you said Erhard their minds are blank, no one's home up there.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 8th, 2003, 3:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: May 22nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1431
Location: Brampton, Ontario Canada
Guest, Scott,
I know what you were trying to say. But you are trying to stereotype people. That is not a good thing to do. I may have been born and raised in the southern U.S. but do not stereotype me. I left home at 18 and have not lived in West Virginia since. I am proud of where I am from but I have seen almost ½ the world and have different views than most from my state. I have lived in Canada for over 25 years. I was raised on a farm in the mountains and was taught to respect the land and nature. That is what I practice. I showed your post to my sons and they had a laugh. They know how I am, who I am, what I practice and what I have taught them. They all said, “He does not know you.”
Quote:
And please correct me if I'm wrong, but are you challenging me to a bar type brawl in the bush? In Temagami? LOL

I never challenged you. What I said was,
Quote:
“Scott, canoe with me for a week and you will find out that I am a nice guy that has the experience and the knowledge that I say I have and I am sure we could be friends. I do what I say and say what I do. I pull no punches and only give punches when deserved. I am a straight up person and what you see is what you get. I would like to meet you on a trip and then you could find out.”

All I did was give you an invitation to canoe with me and get to know me. If that is a challenge, then so be it, but I do not think that is a challenge. You are trying to read too much into my words. Maybe that is why you are so defensive. You try to read between the line when there is no gap.
By the way, I never split any guts in Nam. Maybe you better read some history book about the war before sarcastically make comments. If I told you bout some of my experiences there I would bring a barf bucket for you before I spoke.
Since I have written this I will leave it posted. I will disregard your above comments. Never loose your temper, it is a sign of immaturity.

Sky-B,
I too apologize for getting a little carried away. I have spoken to some that have told me “Yes” at night it is scary to go to far away from the camp or the light from the fire. I was caught up with the comments of Scott and only listed that aspect. I should have also posted that many of the canoeists do not respect nature. If you read my posting about my trip this summer you will see that I mentioned that I had to clean campsites before camping. I found bottles, cans, paper, feminine products and human waste, especially at the Rocks campsite on Obabika in the Temagami area. Someone or some people had torn down the great fire pit that was on that site last fall and had built fires in four other areas at the site. We had to clean that site for about 2 hours before we felt it was liveable. I agree with about the sites that have thunder boxes. They usually are a lot better and a lot cleaner. That is why some people have taken it upon themselves to place thunderboxes on some of the more travelled routes at some of the more popular campsites. This is the only way we can try and keep them from becoming a human waste dump.

Erhard,
You are so right. With some people they have nothing going through their heads except the wind blowing through their hollow cavity.

Donny,
You are also right. Many canoeists come from the Toronto area. This week it was mentioned in the papers and talked about on CFRB radio about how dirty Toronto has become. At one time it was known for its cleanliness and now it is being said that it is no better than a lot of the larger U.S. cities. The litter and garbage is becoming ridiculous. Drive on the 401 and take any off ramp. You will see so much garbage there. People just open up their doors and throw it out by the bag full. Some of these people are canoeist and think it is OK to do the same thing on their trip.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 10th, 2003, 7:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 12th, 2003, 10:11 pm
Posts: 19
Location: St. Catharines ON.
When a park has 3 million visitors a year, it only takes one gum wrapper here and there before you have a situation with litter. I agree with you all in the fact that many people don't use the " wilderness code" and take pride in their parks. You can see it in all these posts...people not using thunderboxes, felling standing trees, poaching, tape decks in the interior, litter...these are all topics on this forum. I remember doing campsite sweeps before leaving to ensure things were gone, and I find garbage on nearly every site. There is a topic on here about lost gear. Okay sometimes something gets up and walks away, but if we checked our site before we left, we would still have our missing kit. Remember when we used to leave enough wood behind for the next guy to start a fire? I still do this but I am becomming a minority. Algonquin today is not what it was even 10 short years ago, and that because of over use, ignorance and not holding yourselves to "the code".

And to you Hillbilly...
It makes me proud that someone who has travelled half the world and seen far off mystic lands, that of all the places, you chose Ontario, to make your home and raise your kin. Cheers to You!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 10th, 2003, 8:53 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: April 26th, 2003, 10:06 pm
Posts: 211
Location: Sudbury, Ontario Canada
Other than thunderboxes at campsites do you think there should be some on long portages or at either end of portages. I find that one of the worst places for toilet paper and human waste is when people are about to embark from a portage or just arriving at land. They may have held it for a while or want to empty out before getting onto the lake again. The paper starts back in the bush and gets increasingly closer with every person. I know this leads back to the lack of respect issue but I think that if you build it they will use it. Most of the time. Some will say that this detracts from the wilderness experience but i'd rather see a thunderbox than piles of human waste scatttered around the portage or campsite. These sights are indeed high use areas and it would be virtually impossible to have a trace free campsite so lets keep it low trace. John.

_________________
See you on the lake.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 82 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group