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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 9:20 am 
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Landjaeger. Found at German meat markets. Its a dry salami type of meat and lasts forever. You will find it hanging in the open.
Ive been fine with homemade jerky for three weeks, never tried a month. I get it quite completely dried and have been lucky not to find any mold on it when I finish(always make too much).


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 11:31 am 
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
We've been playing with our bannock quite a lot in the last few years....it doesn't always have to be boring...one of the favorite recipes uses freeze dried apples and cinnamon....it turns out like an apple fritter.......the amount of freeze dried fruit you wold need to add would be minimal in terms of weight...


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 12:09 pm 
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Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
Just reading 2005 Canoe roots Mag There's an article by Mike Payne and Beth Rubenstein Eat great after day eight
one suggestion was to make your own Yogurt. Apparently you can pick up culture packets at healthfood stores and preheat a thermos add milk powder boiling water and culture, next day voila, yougurt add some rehpdrated berries and some grapnuts...... excellent idea eh!


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 12:31 pm 
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While Gail mentions making your own yogart what about the idea that Scott and Kathy used in WCPP growing their own sprouts! Now that's cool!

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 Post subject: lunch stuff
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 1:39 pm 
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Joined: April 23rd, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Two Harbors, Minnesota USA
Hoop:

Doing away with the bannock is a tall order. On all of our long trips (3 to 6 weeks)
we end up baking bannock each night using the same fire we cook supper on.
North of the treeline it does require a bit of gas though. Luckily, there are several variations of the old bannock recipe, and we take turns making the stuff, so that no one gets burned out doing it. By the way, some hard salamis and cheese will remain edible for several weeks, if they are packaged properly, and honey goes well with peanut butter, as an alternative to jam.

Gordon


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 1:48 pm 
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Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
Kim Gass wrote:
Landjaeger. Found at German meat markets. Its a dry salami type of meat and lasts forever. You will find it hanging in the open.
I second that one, being familiar with German meat stuff. The Landjaeger is the driest of them sausages and does keep well. It even tastes good. :o It's pretty expensive - at the ST. LAwrence Market in TO it sells for $1.- each, but one per lunch is OK for me. I would take care to not let moisture/condensation get to it on the trip to avoid the chance of mold.

The other good suggestion I saw was alfa alfa sprouts: easy to make and very light. It just needs warm enough weather (summer should be OK) and a little bit of planning ahead as part of the daily routine.

The hummus thing I would like to try out myself but I haven't seen yet dried hummus in the stores - they sell hummus in cans and that ain't good enough. MAybe fixing it at home from scratch and then drying it may be the solution.


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 1:54 pm 
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Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
I believe a company by the name of "fantastic" out of Napa Calfornia makes the hummus I've tried, good. They also have refried bean mix, tabouli, various coucous blends, black bean dip........ I picked them up at a little healthfood store on Hazeldean in Kanata, I've seen their brand in the healthfood/exoctic food section in Loblaws as well,


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 2:43 pm 
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Gail R wrote:
I believe a company by the name of "fantastic" out of Napa Calfornia makes the hummus I've tried, good. They also have refried bean mix, tabouli, various coucous blends, black bean dip........ I picked them up at a little healthfood store on Hazeldean in Kanata, I've seen their brand in the healthfood/exoctic food section in Loblaws as well,

They used to be in the health food /natural food area of our local markets but seem to be migrating to the rice/international aisle too in the "normal(processed)" food area. Fantastic is one brand , there are a couple of others..I forget the name. Guess I should get off this forum and do something meaningful like grocery shopping(which I am putting off). :wink:


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 5:34 pm 
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Location: Brampton, Ontario Canada
You can always add raisens or blueberries to banock. If it is not blueberry season, buy them in the store and dehydate them and use the water that you use to re-hydrate them as the water to make the banock with.
Bill

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 9:20 pm 
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To break the monotony you don't have to entirely replace your lunch menu. Just add something interesting or different once or twice a week. I second the suggestions for landjager sausage; it has been fresh for month long trips. I also use the Fantastic brand hummus (make it up in the morning, or at a midmorning break). You can use lemon Koolaid (no sugar) for the lemon juice to add to the hummus. I have also grown alfalfa sprouts on long (4 weeks) canoe trips. It is great to have a fresh vegetable weeks into the trip. Takes about three-four days. Just put them in a draw string fabric bag and dunk them in the water several times a day. Lemon Koolaid and oil and salt and pepper makes a light weight salad dressing for the sprouts. I have also used instant puddings for lunch; good source of protein and carbs. I premeasure the powdered milk into a zip lock baggie and pack it with the packaged pudding. At lunch, I add the pudding mix and water to the ziplock bag and shake rapidly and it all mixes up and is ready to eat in 10 minutes or so. Triscuit crackers seem to pack fairly well and hold up to breakage. You don't have to take a whole trip of triscuits. Just enough to break the monotony of the bannock. The other things I do to break up the monotony of food on a long trip is buy some sort of strong flavored special treat - fancy licorice candy for example - and hide it somewhere. Even though I pre-plan this, several weeks into a trip I never remember what I bought nor where I stashed it. One day it shows up as I am going through the kitchen/food gear and it is always a pleasant surprise.

Erica


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 9:41 pm 
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Hi folks,

Keep the great ideas coming! Many excellent suggestions. I like the ideas of hydrating stuff cold in a nalgene all morning. I had always rejected that idea as too much bother, but I may have to change my attitude.

Remember, I need lightweight and small bulk because a month or more of food is a huge load.

I forgot to mention that milk products are out, except for cheese. I am lactose intolerant. Older harder cheese is OK since the bacteria have eaten most or all of the lactose. So those recipies with yogurt and powdered milk are out for me. I can take Lactaid tablets, but I have found I have lost my taste for milky things. Many commercial sausage and salamis have a lot of milk/whey filler, so I have to be careful about that. I think I may have a source here of lactose-free "Landjaeger", so I will scout that out.

More ideas welcome!


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 9:59 pm 
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I have used natural peanut butter unrefridgerated for probably better than a week. Buy PB in small plastic containers so it gets used up then open a fresh one. We've just kept the jar in a ziploc bag but have not had a leak yet.

Bannock with crumbed bacon and grated cheddar added before baking is good.

When we trip in cooler weather we take a stainless steel thermos. We make cup-o-soup with boiling water when the stove is going in the morning. Lunch is easy, hot meal no dragging out the stove. The thermos is also good for late night hot drinks.

At home I dehydrate homemade split pea soup and use that in the thermos.

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 10:53 pm 
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Location: Venus, Florida
Hoop,

You can use powdered soy milk instead of cow milk. Googling will get you some suppliers. I forgot to mention that when I use lemon Koolaid for flavoring, I use the unreconstituted powder. Also, I have tried the dehydrated peanut buttter on one long trip - and it had turned rancid in its commercially sealed package.

Erica


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PostPosted: February 9th, 2005, 2:23 am 
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I found "Pilot Bisquits" a god send last summer. They are sweetish and keep pretty good. Also they are available in the bush stores along the Mackenzie - where I go. I have tried to find them in the states to no avail.

Going down the Mackenzie from Ft Simpson to Inuvik they were available at all the stops along the way. take some UHT milk and you've got a luxury item that can't be beat - for me. I drag the milk in a holy bag down the river and it chills. Then I crack open the pilot bisquits, add PB & Jelly with a touch of cheeze whiz and voila!

Now consider this. I was a French Chef for 20 years and seemingly should have good taste. I think I do. This rocks! when in the bush.

I also eat spam smothered in brown sugar then lighlty sauteed for an hour or so with a touch of a ginger ale kind off flavor. I add some stewed prunes that have simmered in green tea with cinammon and nutmeg for an hour or more.

Now you got it going on.

I absolutely Denai smoking weed in the bush.


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PostPosted: February 9th, 2005, 7:20 am 
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Location: Ontario Canada
We eat natural (nothing but peanuts) peanut butter at home, and it is a mainstay, being eaten daily by at least one of us. We used to refridgerate it, but like butter, is a pain to use when cold. We leave butter at room temp, 1/4 lb sticks, until it is gone, usually 2-3 days in our family of 4. A couple years ago, we started leaving the peanut butter on the kitchen counter, and have had zero issues with spoilage. Side benefit is that it spreads easily and uniformly, so it does not chill our toast, and we consume a bit less.

2 tricks - I always buy 1 jar ahead, and I flip the unopened one every week or so, which keeps the oil migrating up through the peanut butter. As soon as I open it, using a clean knife, I stir the oil through the jar. After this, while it does get a little thicker near the bottom of the jar, it does not separate. The temperature in our kitchen is different from the up and down extremes of wilderness travel, but I don't think spoliage would be a concern.


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