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PostPosted: March 15th, 2005, 2:58 pm 
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Location: Barrie, Ontario Canada
Hoop, you do dry your own beef, don't you?

As for cheese, can you digest parmesan? A block of that (not shavings -- a solid block) doesn't have much water and it has a lot of salt. It keeps well. Sure, you have to work at getting a hunk off, but it's do-able and it's cheese.

There's also Pinole, a traditional native food made wherever they grew corn. I haven't tried it but I read about it years ago and it stuck in my mind. You take a couple of cups of frozen corn kernels and spread them over a tray so that they touch but are not atop one another. Then sprinkle brown sugar on it. Then parch it in the oven (perhaps under the broiler if the tray can be set right at the bottom of the over -- it has to have time to dry). When dry, grind it up and store it away from moisture.

Here, I've found a website that talks about it

http://www.kurtsaxon.com/foods011.htm

I've always meant to try this, but went to jerky instead. No reason you can't have both. To eat it they say mix a spoonful with a cup of water. If you eat it dry you tend to bloat as it swells.

Someone should try this!


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PostPosted: March 15th, 2005, 3:02 pm 
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Here's a company that sells it...

http://www.mexgrocer.com/9807.html


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PostPosted: March 15th, 2005, 3:10 pm 
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Hmm... perhaps soft, moist, frozen corn isn't right. It might have to be dried kernels, they way the farmer stores it.

Don't know. Should experiment!

http://www.naturalhistorymag.com/editor ... _pick.html


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PostPosted: March 15th, 2005, 4:16 pm 
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Maybe you guys should merge this thread with the spam thread. I mean spam would be a "new lunch" to me, and probably most other CCRers. Maybe not a good lunch but a new lunch.

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 Post subject: need new lunch
PostPosted: April 15th, 2005, 10:23 pm 
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Mung beans make great bean sprouts(never tried alfalfa)...small light beans will produce sprouts in 3 or 4 days. Also tried instant rice on long trips...a small bag lasts a long time...on your morning fire add a handful of minute rice to a pot, some dry soup mix..I like onion soup.. and a small amount of dried veggies...cook until ready...pack hot into nalgene jar and wrap in a shirt in your pack...nice snack for lunch...as for Gails idea...Im from St.Anthony Gail and I loves me salt caplin and yer right..any small fish can be very easily dried at home(I have a 2ft x 2ft flake for drying smelts and sardines...caplin is hard to come by in Ontario!

kirk

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PostPosted: April 20th, 2005, 5:28 pm 
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Mung Beans make me ill! Maybe its because I used to paddle with someone who ate them for lunch every day . He brought a big quart container for a week but had let them sit for weeks before eating them. The only thing I can imagine that smells worse is limburger cheese or very sour milk. Come to think of it; they smelled like the two combined.

As I am evidently biased, how ARE mung beans supposed to smell?


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PostPosted: April 20th, 2005, 5:53 pm 
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My brasilian bf introduced me to "Geléia de Mocotó com leite" last week. It is moist, has a soft spongy texture, needs no refrigeration, has a bit of protein and a bunch of carbs (sugar). Makes for a good desert or snack.

...I thought it was delicious until I found out it is made from the gelatonous interior of cattle feet. :-? I can't quite get past that part. :(


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PostPosted: April 20th, 2005, 8:59 pm 
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SteveBoal wrote:
...I thought it was delicious until I found out it is made from the gelatonous interior of cattle feet. :-? I can't quite get past that part. :(

Sounds like Jello!

Tony


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PostPosted: April 20th, 2005, 9:05 pm 
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SteveBoal wrote:
My brasilian bf introduced me to "Geléia de Mocotó com leite" last week. It is moist, has a soft spongy texture, needs no refrigeration, has a bit of protein and a bunch of carbs (sugar). Makes for a good desert or snack.

...I thought it was delicious until I found out it is made from the gelatonous interior of cattle feet. :-? I can't quite get past that part. :(


Is this because you are now in Vermont and cant bear to think of that lovely Holstein with the long eyelashes surrounding doe soft eyes in your back yard as food?
Gee sounds like you are in a good place to make some geleia do mocoto com leite. I cant find the accents


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PostPosted: April 20th, 2005, 9:26 pm 
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Tonycc wrote:
SteveBoal wrote:
...I thought it was delicious until I found out it is made from the gelatonous interior of cattle feet. :-? I can't quite get past that part. :(

Sounds like Jello!

Tony

Quote:
The gelatin you eat in Jell-O comes from the collagen in cow or pig bones, hooves, and connective tissues. To make gelatin, manufacturers grind up these various parts and pre-treat them with either a strong acid or a strong base to break down cellular structures and release proteins like collagen. After pre-treatment, the resulting mixture is boiled. During this process, the large collagen protein ends up being partially broken down, and the resulting product is called gelatin. The gelatin is easily extracted because it forms a layer on the surface of the boiling mixture.

http://home.howstuffworks.com/question557.htm

Barbara

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PostPosted: April 20th, 2005, 9:38 pm 
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Barbara wrote:
Tonycc wrote:
SteveBoal wrote:
...I thought it was delicious until I found out it is made from the gelatonous interior of cattle feet. :-? I can't quite get past that part. :(

Sounds like Jello!

Tony

Quote:
The gelatin you eat in Jell-O comes from the collagen in cow or pig bones, hooves, and connective tissues. To make gelatin, manufacturers grind up these various parts and pre-treat them with either a strong acid or a strong base to break down cellular structures and release proteins like collagen. After pre-treatment, the resulting mixture is boiled. During this process, the large collagen protein ends up being partially broken down, and the resulting product is called gelatin. The gelatin is easily extracted because it forms a layer on the surface of the boiling mixture.

http://home.howstuffworks.com/question557.htm

Barbara


You people make me sick!! :cry: :evil: :wink:

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PostPosted: April 20th, 2005, 9:45 pm 
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That will teach you to stay away from those Jello shots, wotrock. :tsk:

Honestly, I didn't know that people were in the dark about this. Must be a hell of a shock to vegetarians.

Oh, and "cattle feet"? We always called them "hooves" down on the farm. Can make a good ashtray in a pinch. :lol:

Barbara

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PostPosted: April 21st, 2005, 6:20 am 
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Well, I guess all that processing should make me feel better. When I think of hooves I think of them covered with mud and dung; hooves make me heave (couldn't resist that alliteration). Geléia de Mocotó com leite is tasty (just cut and past for the accents). Maybe I'll have to bring some for the group to sample in Wabakimi.


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PostPosted: April 21st, 2005, 6:53 am 
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SteveBoal wrote:
Well, I guess all that processing should make me feel better. When I think of hooves I think of them covered with mud and dung; hooves make me heave (couldn't resist that alliteration). Geléia de Mocotó com leite is tasty (just cut and past for the accents). Maybe I'll have to bring some for the group to sample in Wabakimi.


Make sure you leave some "Geléia de Mocotó com leite" with Uncle Phil so that we can enjoy it on Trip #3 if this stuff doesn't freeze during your trip #1

I'm game. I like cow hooves! :wink: Has anyone tried pickled pigs feet? Imagine pickled jello :doh:

Boneli

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PostPosted: April 21st, 2005, 8:07 am 
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Hello Hoop,
I did not pay much attention to this thread so I’m a little late jumping in here.

For myself I find eating to be the only drawback to wilderness canoeing. I’ve been out for up to a month and the only reason I’m ever glad to get back is to get some fresh fruits, veggies, etc. The fly in weight restrictions really makes food choices difficult for someone like me who is a lacto-ovo vegetarian. And of course, like you, I find the mid day cold lunch question difficult to satisfy.

Last summer on our 3 week Thelon trip I brought the following for daytime eating.
I decided for a mid morning protein bar. There are probably some made from a lactose free whey protein. I have never seen any made from egg protein. At home I would never eat these bars because of some of the other ingredients, however once a year for a few weeks will not kill me.
For lunch I had prepared and sealed in very small individual plastic bags each of the following items necessary for one lunch: a mixture of ½ cup of raw oats (largest oats I could find – I always eat my oats raw at home so this is not a problem for me and besides raw oats have a nutty flavor), one complete dehydrated orange chopped up, ¼ cup of purchased dried raisins (which I then dehydrated some more as to remove all humidity – this is a must), ¼ cup of unsalted mixed nuts (not recommended for someone who has tooth fillings that could pop under the chewing pressure required to break some nuts) and ½ cup ( = 20 grams of complete protein) of cold temp Parmalat powdered milk (not available in grocery stores and contrary to the regular powdered milks, which are heat prepared, contain all of the necessary amino acids, I get mine at local health food store) and ¼ cup of a unflavored high quality whey protein . I mix all ingredients together with some water in a Nalgene jar after breakfast and let soak until noon. Since good fats should make up about 30% - 40% of total calories on a canoe trip I add either 2 tablespoons of cold pressed virgin olive oil to the mix or I pop 3 – 4 flax seed oil capsules.
For mid afternoon snack I bring some oversize biscuits that I get at the local heath food store. Can’t remember the name at the moment. They contain carbs, soya protein and good fats.

If someone was lactose intolerant I would suggest egg protein instead of the powdered milk or the whey protein. Here is a place to get egg protein:
http://www.sndcanada.com/gc/gc_item.exe ... F=S&FK=egg protein&Z9=0
The advantage of high quality micro processed whey proteins ( some are lactose free) are that they are immuno system builders and enhancers. On a canoe trip of the barrens type you should be getting about 1.5 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight per day. The protein, like the good fats, should be divided up as equally as possible between all meals.

Hope that with everybody’s ideas posted here you can come up with something.
Cheers,
GG


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