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 Post subject: a new discovery...
PostPosted: October 16th, 2007, 9:16 am 
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I've discovered a food science called molecular gastronomy... and how to make powders from things such as peanut butter and other nut butters. I'm very excited... there is a somewhat-hard-to-find ingredient used in this but I will find a good source and post the info when I know that my results are consistent.

Why am I excited about this? Well it is merely another way to make food more interesting for trips.


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PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 7:14 am 
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Location: Mapping Wabakimi PP!
Looking forward to the results of your research. I like new food ideas as well since I trip with the famous outdoor chef, Pake the cooking Dutchman!

Barry

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PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 10:19 am 
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Boneli wrote:
Looking forward to the results of your research. I like new food ideas as well since I trip with the famous outdoor chef, Pake the cooking Dutchman!

Barry


Pake is a great cook from what I've heard (I think he was the fellow who first told me about preserved lemons).


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PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 11:58 am 
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"Molecular Gastronomy"
read all about it here:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... dWine/home


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PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 12:47 pm 
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Mac wrote:
"Molecular Gastronomy"
read all about it here:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... dWine/home


Where's the molecular part?? I was expecting something about scientific food processing. This Blumenthal dude is everything I am running away from when I go off to the woods.

WC, I hope you won't be advocating baking iPods into your recipes or I won't be able to make myself buy your book. :lol: :lol:

Seriously, though, I find it interesting to look at food from a different angle. Not exactly "molecular" but my wife subscribes to Cook's Illustrated and I find their methodology fascinating ("after trying 162 recipes on 1249 meat loafs, we found..."). Can't say they always come up with a recipe I agree tastes better, but they sure are thorough.

When camping I always try to get less food oriented than I am in my regular life. This is good as I've got more than just a spare tire, I've got the whole tire store. Getting into the outdoors reminds me that food is just fuel, and if it's a bit boring I'll have to draw on my own reserves. But I can understand those skinny folks out there who need to tank up on 4-5000 calories/day just to replenish what they've burned up. For all of you high metabolism types out there, the more palatable the better.

I am a bit curious about this liquid nitrogen stuff. Cryogenics is fascinating and a thermous bottle will get you some at the welding gas supplier. Be extremely careful with the stuff as it can cause serious damage.

Now...to eBay to look for a vacuum pump... :wink:

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PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 12:48 pm 
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:o
I read that article and I gotta say, Sound of the Sea seems to represent what our future could be. The presentation of the meal could be a reminder of what the earth used to look and sound like and the only people who can afford to eat are the rich. :-? Yeah, I'd cry too.

The article ended with the chef's words, "If you don't want to use modern technology, then you should cook over a fire."

I think I prefer the fire.

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PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 12:54 pm 
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splashdancer wrote:
:o
I read that article and I gotta say, Sound of the Sea seems to represent what our future could be. The presentation of the meal could be a reminder of what the earth used to look and sound like and the only people who can afford to eat are the rich. :-? Yeah, I'd cry too.

The article ended with the chef's words, "If you don't want to use modern technology, then you should cook over a fire."

I think I prefer the fire.


Yeah Splash, I'll second all of that. :clap: :clap: :clap:

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PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 12:56 pm 
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my big curiousity will involve the scale and a product called tapioca maltodextrin

with the right ratio of fat (say nutella or peanut butter) to the t m I can make a powder. i'm not sure if this powder is lighter and that is what I am going to test

you can also make any liquid fat into a powder - such as olive oil - having it in powder form would be less messy for trips - which also means I could nix the leafproof bottles (less containers = a lighter pack) granted it is only a few grams but in larger and longer group trips these kinds of savings could add up (here is my backpacker mentality creeping in again)

i have 3 pounds (a pound each of different brands of tapioca maltodextrin) coming from a supplier in Brampton and will test each one to see what works best and to determine if this is even a good idea

I'm going to delve into some other areas of this modern way of "cooking" for entertaining at home - I think it might be fun and I need a new challenge in the kitchen (that and I want to try some old techniques too... we are going to build a wood oven in the backyard next spring)


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PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 1:06 pm 
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******* wrote:
you can also make any liquid fat into a powder - such as olive oil - having it in powder form would be less messy for trips - which also means I could nix the leafproof bottles (less containers = a lighter pack) granted it is only a few grams but in larger and longer group trips these kinds of savings could add up (here is my backpacker mentality creeping in again)


Very intriguing WC. You'd decease a lot of bulk for sure. That's the big enemy for me since I could carry a horse if it was compact enough but the bulk gets tedious real quickly.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 1:14 pm 
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Location: sutton, ontario
Tapioca Maltodextrine can be purchased here:

http://www.lepicerie.com/catalog/product_702700_Tapioca_Maltodextrin.html

From what I understand you add it to highly fatty foods. It reconstitutes in your mouth and apparently it gets quite gloppy when you add water. Also it adds a starchy flavour depending on what you’re adding it to. Highly flavoured foods like peanut butter and bacon work fine but milder foods like (high fat) yogurt and sour cream it's not so great.

I haven't used it myself, my friend’s niece is a food scientist and she told me about it.

Here a good link on the basics of Molecular Gastronomy.

http://www.discoverychannel.co.uk/science/kitchen_chemistry/index.shtml


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 Post subject: T
PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 4:13 pm 
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Wow, how timely. I just watched a show on the Food Network where these techniques were used to determine who was the next Iron Chef.

The Next Iron Chef
Episode IO0102
http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/show_io ... 64,00.html

Part 2: Simplicity and Innovation
Host Alton Brown gives the chefs their next two tests: Simplicity and Innovation: the chefs must produce one flavor-packed bite that reveals everything about their culinary style and personality. Then, special guest Wiley Dufresne arrives at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. to inspire the chefs to blend science, art and food.

AIR TIMES:
October 14, 2007 9:00 PM ET/PT
October 15, 2007 12:00 AM ET/PT
October 18, 2007 9:00 PM ET/PT
October 19, 2007 12:00 AM ET/PT
October 20, 2007 5:00 PM ET/PT
October 20, 2007 10:00 PM ET/PT
October 21, 2007 1:00 AM ET/PT
October 21, 2007 6:00 PM ET/PT
November 11, 2007 5:00 PM ET/PT


It looks like this episode will be replayed numerous times up through November.

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 Post subject: Re: T
PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 6:16 pm 
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Worth wrote:
Wow, how timely. I just watched a show on the Food Network where these techniques were used to determine who was the next Iron Chef.


Seriously? FoodTv.ca mentions that The Next Iron Chef premiers on Sunday so now I'll definitely follow it... so don't give anymore of it away. It was actually a show called Top Chef (and a chef named Marcel) that first piqued my interest in this and then I saw a guest chef on Iron Chef do some neat things with a vacuum sealer and with a plate of nitrogen.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 6:58 pm 
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Battenkiller wrote:
Quote:
Where's the molecular part?? I was expecting something about scientific food processing. This Blumenthal dude is everything I am running away from when I go off to the woods


Yeah!, there is nothing molecular about any of this, it is just more marketing piffle.

And ******... it wasn't nitroglycerine that the chef was mixing up even if that is what he said it was... did he set it on fire or did he blow himself up ?......it is not very edible either.....more marketing piffle.

I'll be joining you out there Battenkiller, away from these snake oil peddlars.

In the meantime, I need to think about next years trip meals. They will be made of molecules too. Lots and lots of molecules.

And ****** you can buy powdered shortening from Harvest Food Works . Go to: http://www.harvestfoodworks.com/listproducts.cfm?id=62
probably full of trans fat though .... so maybe not such a good thing to eat too much of.... will clog your arteries... but don't worry that nitro glycerine stuff, the molecular cooks are playing with, will get them opened up and working again. :wink:


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 Post subject: Re: T
PostPosted: October 17th, 2007, 7:25 pm 
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******* wrote:
Worth wrote:
Wow, how timely. I just watched a show on the Food Network where these techniques were used to determine who was the next Iron Chef.


Seriously? FoodTv.ca mentions that The Next Iron Chef premiers on Sunday so now I'll definitely follow it... so don't give anymore of it away. It was actually a show called Top Chef (and a chef named Marcel) that first piqued my interest in this and then I saw a guest chef on Iron Chef do some neat things with a vacuum sealer and with a plate of nitrogen.


Great. Little Marcel with the so pretty hair who cooks with foam and chemicals out of the lab. What a panty waist. I bet he never went on a canoe trip. He wasn't a nice person either.

Have no interest in any of his food; that bubbly stuff and pink soup he made was disgusting.

Give me pork and beans anytime.

Now as to secret ingredient on the Next Iron Chef..dessert made out of catfish and one out of tripe. Dehydrator anyone?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: October 18th, 2007, 5:47 am 
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Mac wrote:
Battenkiller wrote:
Quote:
Where's the molecular part?? I was expecting something about scientific food processing. This Blumenthal dude is everything I am running away from when I go off to the woods


Yeah!, there is nothing molecular about any of this, it is just more marketing piffle.

And ******... it wasn't nitroglycerine that the chef was mixing up even if that is what he said it was... did he set it on fire or did he blow himself up ?......it is not very edible either.....more marketing piffle.

I'll be joining you out there Battenkiller, away from these snake oil peddlars.

In the meantime, I need to think about next years trip meals. They will be made of molecules too. Lots and lots of molecules.

And ****** you can buy powdered shortening from Harvest Food Works . Go to: http://www.harvestfoodworks.com/listproducts.cfm?id=62
probably full of trans fat though .... so maybe not such a good thing to eat too much of.... will clog your arteries... but don't worry that nitro glycerine stuff, the molecular cooks are playing with, will get them opened up and working again. :wink:


i said nitrogen didn't i? don't want to blow myself up

you can also buy powdered butter and powdered peanut butter from Walton Feed - lol - but it is expensive and it would really be cool to do your own fats - my favorite olive oil for example - anyway the fun is in the trying - lol

littleredcanoe - Marcel was an ass - but I wanted to see what all this foam business was about - I can't stand foams (now that I've tried them) - totally easy to make but it is a texture thing for me - but if I can apply the powdering technique it might have a use for backpackers (maybe even the odd canoeist)... especially where the oils/fats are concerned as tapioca maltodextrin is better used with a fat

for those who are freaked out by the ingredient - it is in a lot of what we eat


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