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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 2:53 pm 
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carbritkye - what Ted says concerning the heat at which you use the Outback Oven is a great point. The Outback Oven was originally designed by Cascade Designs - who owns MSR. I think heat output is why there is a heat deflector that has to be put below the burner and also the riser is part of the solution keeping the stove from having issues.


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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 4:48 pm 
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Ray,

What I do is plan my meals and then sort of go through the motions of making them at home. The easiest way is to actually take the cooking utensil needed and set it on the table. Go through each meal and see if all the items needed are on the table. Try to re-use previous items. If you can't, add what you need. If you find you have an item for just one meal, find a different method so you can avoid it or change the menu.The size of the pots depend on what you're making. Two pots and two stoves sound reasonable to me.

A lot depends on what you're making and the techniques you're using.

Regarding pasta (and maybe this is the technique ******* was talking about), I boil the water, add the pasta and bring back to a boil for about a minute, remove from stove, cover, and wrap it in a jacket (or other warm thing). Just let it sit while you make the rest of the meal. Pasta will be done when you're ready for it (or 15 minutes whichever is longer).


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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 4:49 pm 
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I have some 8L stock pots that I use all the time for large groups with no problems on old coleman 505s, 442s, Bluets,Primus, Optimus, whisperlights and dragonflys just to name a few, with absolutely no problem. The bottoms are 9 1/4 in.
1 8L pot will cook a full 950 gram package of pasta or stew for 14 with room to spare. 8)

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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 5:09 pm 
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Bannock wrote:

Regarding pasta (and maybe this is the technique ******* was talking about), I boil the water, add the pasta and bring back to a boil for about a minute, remove from stove, cover, and wrap it in a jacket (or other warm thing). Just let it sit while you make the rest of the meal. Pasta will be done when you're ready for it (or 15 minutes whichever is longer).


Bannock - not sure if it is the same method but somewhat similar. I actually pre-cook (slightly underdone) the pasta at home and then dehydrate it. It will rehydrate with cold water for pasta salad or hot water for a hot meal. I tend to use heartier pastas like ravioli, tortellini, farfalle and such. For the stuffed pasta the pre-cooking and drying is a must.


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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 5:22 pm 
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I must be dense....I don't see the logic in taking a food product which has already been dried, rehydrating it, drying it again and then rehydrating AGAIN.

Sure the dried pasta is uncooked but pasta only requires about 2 minutes of actual cooking time the other 8 - 10 minutes is simply rehydrating.

I suppose there might be some theoretical fuel savings in the field (the extra 2 minutes) but I'd find it difficult to understand how it could even be quantified.

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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 5:54 pm 
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Location: Guelph, ON
I use a 10 inch diameter frying pan on my MSR stoves ( - minus the handle) whenever I travel with a second person. Presently I am using a Simmerlite. Prior to that I used a Whisperjet. I bought the first stove in 1990 just after they started selling them in Canada.

Keep the fuel bottle outside of the windscreen to protect it from reflected heat coming off the stove or off the bottom of the pan.

If you need to use a bigger diameter pot or pan that has potential to reflect heat onto the fuel bottle then cover the bottle with aluminum foil, keeping the foil off the bottle suface a few centimetres. Check the surface temperature of the bottle frequently as you cook, to monitor any increase in bottle surface temperature.If it gets the slightest bit hot to your touch then your set up is wrong and you need to turn the stove off and improve the set-up.

And maintain your stove.

If you are not comfortable with this process or don't understand the requirement of keeping the fuel bottle at ambient temperatures under all cooking conditions with larger pots then stick to the MSR directions and don't use a larger pot or pan than that which is recommended by MSR.

And maintain your stove.Change the gaskets on the fuel bottles every few years as soon as or before cracks become evident in the rubber 'O" Rings, change the pump assembly if you see any sign of deterioration and replace it with a new one, change the pump seal/ fuel bottle "O"ring assembly if a leak is detected or if the bottle does not hold pressure, change the internal "O" Ring in the fuel pump assembly where the fuel line is inserted at least once a season or more often if you are tripping extensively each year.

Other required maintanance will become readily evident because the stove will not work.

If you need to use a great big pot then use a second stove under it......but remember to protect the fuel bottle(s) from heat..........and properly support the pot so that all is stable......

And enjoy yourself........

And ****** ....the heat riser is to keep your cake or muffins from burning. It has nothing to do with keeping the stove cool.The round aluminum or tin reflector sold with the Outback oven apparatus that is designed to go under the stove below the burner assembly is to push heat upwards off the ground. Remember that you are using the cozy for baking and the stove is set on simmer. If you use an acorn stand for your stove this circular reflector becomes redundant.

Actually the most of the Outback Oven apparatus in pretty much redundant Use a 10inch pan and turn a 10inch aluminum pie plate upside down on top of the pan and you have a workable baking oven. If you are using a smaller diameter pan then buy a smaller pie plate and use that as a cover. Forget the aluminized fiberglass cozy, you can easily bake without it in most summer conditions. If you are trying to bake in very cold conditions with a strong wind chill on the pot or the pan during the winter or the shoulder seasons then it is helpful..
But don't forget the heat riser or you will be sorry. You will be eating burned muffins...
The heat riser is sold separately and is a great way to improve the heat distribution across the bottom of the pan and prevent the burner flame from impinging directly on the pan and on your muffins..... :wink:


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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 6:04 pm 
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recped wrote:
I must be dense....I don't see the logic in taking a food product which has already been dried, rehydrating it, drying it again and then rehydrating AGAIN.

Sure the dried pasta is uncooked but pasta only requires about 2 minutes of actual cooking time the other 8 - 10 minutes is simply rehydrating.

I suppose there might be some theoretical fuel savings in the field (the extra 2 minutes) but I'd find it difficult to understand how it could even be quantified.


Actually there are several reasons - one is that you don't need to boil the water to rehydrate it... thus fuel savings and also water savings (I only need to add enough water to rehydrate the cooked pasta and not 2 to 3 times the water for cooking and I don't have to dispose of starchy water either) and pastas such as ravioli, tortellini, radiatore, farfalle, fusilli, etc... are a little more difficult to rehydrate. Another reason is I can dehydrate a whole meal and rehydrate it all in one pot or container.


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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 6:12 pm 
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Mac wrote:
And ****** ....the heat riser is to keep your cake or muffins from burning. It has nothing to do with keeping the stove cool.The round aluminum or tin reflector sold with the Outback oven apparatus that is designed to go under the stove below the burner assembly is to push heat upwards off the ground. Remember that you are using the cozy for baking and the stove is set on simmer. If you use an acorn stand for your stove this circular reflector becomes redundant.

Actually the most of the Outback Oven apparatus in pretty much redundant Use a 10inch pan and turn a 10inch aluminum pie plate upside down on top of the pan and you have a workable baking oven. If you are using a smaller diameter pan then buy a smaller pie plate and use that as a cover. Forget the aluminized fiberglass cozy, you can easily bake without it in most summer conditions. If you are trying to bake in very cold conditions with a strong wind chill on the pot or the pan during the winter or the shoulder seasons then it is helpful..
But don't forget the heat riser or you will be sorry. You will be eating burned muffins...
The heat riser is sold separately and is a great way to improve the heat distribution across the bottom of the pan and prevent the burner flame from impinging directly on the pan and on your muffins..... :wink:


Hi Mac.. I know all to well what the riser is intended for and it does the job but we also use it as a toaster or for reducing the heat on a pan. With the riser and a 10 inch fry pan for example... on the dragonfly there is more heat loss out the top of the windscreen when the riser is in place because it puts the pan a little higher above the windscreen instead of the larger pan trapping the heat. Of course one could just leave the windscreen open at one side too. Another little tip - the tent for the OOven is great for use when you want to keep foods warm.

Shortly I am testing a new stove system called the Caldera Cone. I'll have to post photos and a report of what I think of it once it has been through the rigors.


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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 6:29 pm 
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I was simply responding to what you wrote ******:

Quote:
I think heat output is why there is a heat deflector that has to be put below the burner and also the riser is part of the solution keeping the stove from having issues.


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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 8:07 pm 
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Mac wrote:
I was simply responding to what you wrote ******:

Quote:
I think heat output is why there is a heat deflector that has to be put below the burner and also the riser is part of the solution keeping the stove from having issues.


I know i should have been more specific


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PostPosted: November 12th, 2007, 9:47 pm 
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Location: Cornwall Ont
Mac Using a pie plate to make your own Outback oven gave me an idea to make a riser using a coffee can. This is what I came up with. Claude made it tonight it is roughly done but think the idea would work.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/10688107@N02/


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PostPosted: November 13th, 2007, 12:07 pm 
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Looks like that would work well for either a toaster or a heat riser. I am guessing that you could make good toast on the one in the picture.

This Spring, my old double Hibachi was pretty much falling apart so I bought a $50 Spherical BBQ in stainless from Ikea.
Unfortunately, for 1 or 2 people it uses too much charcoal , so I cut a coffee can down in size, just as Claude did and then I got a suitably sized stainless steel bowel, put some holes in the bottom and nestled it into the coffee can. I use the bowel as the fire box .This raises the charcoal layer up closer to the grilling surface and now I only need about 6 to 12 pieces of charcoal or briquets to cook our dinner on, when we are out car camping.

There are lots of uses for empty coffee cans. I keep almost all of mine and use them to store dehydrated food in until I need it to make up tripping dinners.
But I have now collected so many of them that I am starting to get the evil eye whenever I ask Ruth to save the next one.......that is close to being empty.


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PostPosted: November 13th, 2007, 2:24 pm 
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We use full size coffee cans for toaters when car camping. Works really well. Here is a picture.
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=1 ... =509898322
&
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=1 ... =509898322


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PostPosted: November 13th, 2007, 2:32 pm 
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Yeah, Carbrityke, I like that toaster. It's looks as if it would make great toast for 1 or 2 people.

I notice in my previous post that I didn't proof read it very carefully.
It was bowl that I used not a bowel.
Not sure how I made the same mistake twice.
Must be getting old and inattentive. :(


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PostPosted: November 13th, 2007, 4:43 pm 
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Location: Grand Bend Ontario
Our fall trips consist of 5-6 adults and are most often 8 days or so moving. We bring 2 one burner colemans and an out back oven. With the outback we discarded the fold up foil deflector and use a regular solid wind deflector that fits right over the burner.

We bring 3 pots and always have at least one pasta meal, this year it was tortellini alfredo with carrots and garlic bannock.

Image

While supper is cooked on 1 stove , dessert is often on the other, or bannock or water for hot drinks with our meal.

Mostly dehydr. food prepard at home. In the morning, again, breakfast on one stove while the other boils water for coffee or what ever. So one stove is used a lot and the other just when we need it. Breakfast can be anything from instant oatmeal( usually on the last day) to fruit dumplings or apple crisp and other things, pancakes etc.

Image

Fruit for dumplings all dehydr. at home.

Image

I can't remember what we call this :doh: but its got pecans and brown sugar and dehydr. apples, we make up a syrup with marg. and brown sugar to go with it.

The biggest challenge is finding a variety of healthy meals everyone will like and recipes where the portions match the appitites of those on the trip.

We try different recipes all the time cause eating the same thing trip after trip can get old after awhile.

First night this year was ball park sausages prepard at home and just warmed up with mashed pots. and fresh green beans and sauerkraut.

Image

We use the Out B. alot and have never had a problem with overheating but we are well aware of the danger.

We're on holiday when we're out so we like to eat well, food is not something we scimp out on. The barrel might feel heavy on the portage, but it does get lighter as you go, and if you go to bed with a full belly you can't help but have a good time :D

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