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 Post subject: Big fibre
PostPosted: February 8th, 2008, 8:11 pm 
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Any suggestions for easy cooking lightweight (read no cooler) meals with high fibre contenet?


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PostPosted: February 9th, 2008, 8:02 pm 
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Location: Cornwall Ont
Here is a list of the top 20 foods for fiber. Since beans tops the list chili would be a good meal to take along. just make as usual and dehydrate it then rehydrate in camp.


The Top Twenty Fiber Foods
This list can serve as a general guide. For more specific calorie and fiber content of particular foods, to estimate your daily and weekly quotas, refer to the alphabetical chart that follows:
1. Dried beans, peas, and other legumes
This includes baked beans, kidney beans, split peas, dried limas, garbanzos, pinto beans and black beans.
2. Bran cereals
Topping this list are Bran Buds and All-Bran, but 100% Bran, Raisin Bran, Most and Cracklin' Bran are also excellent sources.
3. Fresh or frozen lima beans, both Fordhook and baby limas
4. Fresh or frozen green peas
5. Dried fruit, topped by figs, apricots and dates
6. Raspberries, blackberries and strawberries
7. Sweet corn, whether on the cob or cut off in kernels
8. Whole-wheat and other whole-grain cereal products.
Rye, oats, buckwheat and stone-ground cornmeal are all high in fiber. Bread, pastas, pizzas, pancakes and muffins made with whole-grain flours.
9. Broccoli-very high in fiber!
10. Baked potato with the skin
(The skin when crisp is the best part for fiber.) Mashed and boiled potatoes are good, too-but not french fries, which contain a high percentage of fat.
11. Green snap beans, pole beans, and broad beans
(These are packaged frozen as Italian beans, in Europe they are known as haricot or french beans.)
12. Plums, pears, and apples
The skin is edible, and are all high in pectin.
13. Raisins and prunes
Not as high on the list as other dried fruits (see #5) but very valuable.
14. Greens
Including spinach, beet greens, kale, collards, swiss chard and turnip greens.
15. Nuts
Especially almonds, Brazil nuts, peanuts, and walnuts (Consume these sparingly, because of their high fat content.).
16. Cherries
17. Bananas
18. Carrots
19. Coconut
(dried or fresh-but both are high in fat content).
20. Brussels sprouts


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PostPosted: February 9th, 2008, 9:18 pm 
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I have seen the "evidence", (I don't think I need to explain?) almonds are high fibre, easy, and light weight, and high energy.

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PostPosted: February 9th, 2008, 10:19 pm 
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Get your fibre and omega 3 in ground flax seed. I make a cold cereal from vanilla soy beverage(4oz.) and ground flax seed(4 tablespoons) and blueberries, if you're lucky enough to find fresh ones. The cereal thickens up in a few minutes in the bowl, no cooking required. Ground flax can be added to cooked oatmeal too.

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PostPosted: February 10th, 2008, 6:54 am 
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Lately my answer to every food question has been Stagg Chili!! :lol:

It's magic. Half a can of the silverado beef flavour has 8 g of fibre, and one person can easily eat half a can, mixed with KD or with rice or pasta. Get the vegetarian or silverado beef flavour because they are low fat and so dehydrate well. Easiest thing to dehydrate, just open the can and spread it out on the tray. You can add more fat like cheese at camp.


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PostPosted: February 10th, 2008, 10:10 am 
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Location: Cornwall Ont
Redstart Your Stagg chili post reminded me of one of my favourite lunches. This is not for camping but thoufght I'd share it just the same.
Make a toss salad to it add some warmed up Stagg chili some shreddded chedder cheese, crush in some tortilla chips top with salsa sauce. This is oh sooo good.


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PostPosted: February 11th, 2008, 12:31 pm 
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Quote:
. I make a cold cereal from vanilla soy beverage(4oz.)

Does that keep/travel well, soy? Stagg doesn't seem like a light weight dood and cans are verbotten in many places.

Adding ground flax... Does it add or is it neutral to the flavour of the meal?
The question is really.. what can I bring in a plastic bag, add water to, heat 'n eat ,that has good fibre content?


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PostPosted: February 11th, 2008, 2:23 pm 
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Location: Brantford
best place to ask about this is the community forums over at backpacker.com

http://www.backpacker.com/cgi-bin/forum ... =512107219 or contact Laurie through her wilderness cooking website


Last edited by photoguy on February 12th, 2008, 12:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: February 11th, 2008, 8:55 pm 
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Location: Cambridge Ontario
Alex1 wrote:
Quote:
. I make a cold cereal from vanilla soy beverage(4oz.)

Does that keep/travel well, soy?
Adding ground flax... Does it add or is it neutral to the flavour of the meal?
The question is really.. what can I bring in a plastic bag, add water to, heat 'n eat ,that has good fibre content?


I don't depend one just one item for my breakfast menu. I don't tolerate milk well so that's my reason for using a small tetra pack soy beverage (no refridgeration needed) on short trips. You could just as well use powdered milk and water with the ground flax. It's easy and you could also sweeten it if you desire with honey, sugar or maple syrup. Flax has a nutty flavour and can be added to breakfast shakes at home too.

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Margaret Atwood


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PostPosted: March 28th, 2008, 3:25 pm 
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Location: Richmond Hill, Ontario
my magic recipe is a glass of milk (or some sort of milk product) followed 5 min later by something like a pickle(anything pickled really) or ketchup flavour chips. makes the waiting line go that much quicker.

some other alternative remedies:
my friends swear by oatmeal in the morning.
cofee(with cofee mate) seems to do the majic on ocasion.
a smoke is an old time favourite. it sucks that i quit, so will have to stick to the dairy and ketchup chips then.

hope it helps, because god forbid you plug up that Harveys toilet with your foot long torpedo after a 4 day trip of not going due to strict noodle soup and salami diet.


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PostPosted: March 28th, 2008, 5:44 pm 
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Listen up guys and ladies... never mind all of that ....Carry a bag of dried prunes and munch on 2 or 3 or a few more, if you are daring.
Then wait ... patiently... but not too long. :wink:


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PostPosted: March 28th, 2008, 6:04 pm 
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It shouldn't matter if you're canoeing or at home day to day living. Think everyday to eat quality fibre like Carb's list + water = we wouldn't even be talking about this sh!t. 8)

Too many diseases of middle age are the result of inattention to the previous 40 years. :roll: We need to think preventative. Oh, and cut ALL transfats out of your diet. I read somewhere that "shortening" should read "shortens your life" and no amount should be considered safe. :roll:

:)

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"Nature used to surround us, now we surround nature and the change hasn't necessarily been for the better."
Margaret Atwood


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PostPosted: March 29th, 2008, 1:14 pm 
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Nobody mentioned oatmeal, granola and instant brown rice. These are my general standbys--and they have lotsa fiber. I I find that we eat more outdoors, so fiber lack isn't a big issue. In general, you only need the cooler for fiber--poor foods such as meats, cheese and chocolate--and cheese and chocolate and even shelled eggs can be safely kept for a week or more without refrigeration.


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