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 Post subject: Cooking in winter...
PostPosted: February 21st, 2008, 9:25 am 
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Joined: March 1st, 2007, 9:15 am
Posts: 146
Location: Milton, Ont.
What do you use in terms of stove and fuel?
If cooking over fire what kind of pot and pans?

I would like to get a pot I can use to boil water over open fire in but I just dont know which way to look. Will any of the lightweight pots do or no?? Any advice appreciated.

thanx

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PostPosted: February 21st, 2008, 12:03 pm 
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Joined: December 29th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 6239
Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
I cooked the same way as during canoe trips, except that some of the meals were kept frozen in plastic containers. Cooking in cold weather was the last thing I wanted to do and heating up a frozen stew in a pot was easiest.

A liquid fuel stove that can be pumped up to pressure will heat food better than a gas cannister stove. In cold weather the cannister gas pressure will be low, along with the heat. I used an old Optimus with pump and white gas liquid fuel.

If you're cooking over an open fire, a pot with a wire bail handle will make things much easier, since you can hang the pot from a stick, or a tripod made from saplings.

Something along these lines:

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PostPosted: February 21st, 2008, 12:34 pm 
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Joined: March 1st, 2007, 9:15 am
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Location: Milton, Ont.
Thats what I am looking for... any idea where to get such a beast?? hehe

thanx

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PostPosted: March 8th, 2008, 12:26 pm 
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Joined: November 26th, 2007, 7:46 pm
Posts: 50
Location: Manitoba
That beast looks like an Open Country 10-quart non-stick kettle. I have the 4 and 2 quart without the non-stick coating and they're great. For winter cooking I use coffee cans on the fire. The only problem is that they don't have proper lids, making it harder to boil water quickly. I find the lid from the 2-quart pot to fit almost perfectly on the top of a large coffee can though. At the end of the winter season just clean the cans off and recycle them. Removing soot is much easier if you coat the cans in dishsoap before you cook.
Anyways for winter cooking I wouldn't spend money on a pot like that when a can works just as well. I only use my pots during paddling season.
http://www.opencountrycampware.com/
If you're looking for rugged outdoor pots though, thats the site to visit.

Hugh

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PostPosted: March 27th, 2008, 12:45 pm 
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Joined: March 26th, 2008, 1:32 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Richmond Hill, Ontario
hi,
probably a little late as the tem starts climbing above freezing nowadays.

but our basic cooking gear consists of my friend's regular aluminum pots and pans set, a very old and very usefull still, the lids are actually doubling up as frying pans. I think bass Pro and Canadian tire still cary this type of gear.
We usually used the regular propane burners, but they are bad for winter unless you shelter the heat. My friend has a very old cooking stove that uses the propane canisters. i bought last summer the hiking flex fuel burner, it burns anything from kerosine to white fuel to all sorts of liquids, and it performed quite well in both summer algonquin and fall and winter camping, and you carry less because it is so efficient (no heavy propane canisters). and the 2 bottles last more than 4 day trip to algonquin, so quit nice that way.

we also employ a cheap solution in campsite camping. the aluminum one time use baking pans, you know they are like few bucs for a pack of 3 or 4(there are big once for turkeys and small for baking a cake or pie or something), they are perfect for cooking solids(any frozen vegies, reheating fried rice, etc) over an open fire, and you can just throw them away after.

for algonquin we use an old pan because you know it might get damaged. but the once that frozentripper recomended is just right(again due to the weight of things), but like HFRI said, you don't want to bring your best stuff when you know you can damage it and you have cheaper and simpler alternatives.


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