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PostPosted: July 27th, 2012, 9:28 pm 
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Having never made it on my own, I'm at a loss...

I'm planning a 2 week Algonguin interior trip, and bannock is one of our culinary goals.

Do I add the lard/margarine/vegetable oil to the mix at home? Will this keep?

Or rather, do I keep a mix of flour etc, and then add shortening as I make portions for meals?

Having never made a mix I expect to have ready throughout the trip, I dont know where to start!


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PostPosted: July 27th, 2012, 9:49 pm 
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I always use lard, and add it to the mix at home. Never had trouble with it for up to 10 days.

Here is a link to one of the members here website recipes. This is what I do for bannock too. As a bonus, check out his idea for crepes. I have done them up, and topped with a hand whipped (with a fork) whip cream from powder and rehydrated strawberries. Extremely tasty dessert treat for the backcountry. :)

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PostPosted: July 28th, 2012, 12:13 am 
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bimber wrote:
Do I add the lard/margarine/vegetable oil to the mix at home? Will this keep?


Yes & yes.

And my bannock trick is adding powdered milk to the mix.

And rum. The rum versions always taste better.


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PostPosted: July 28th, 2012, 9:31 am 
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Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
Yes mix everything at home first - its way easier. Lard is unrefrigerated in the store. It will keep fine in your mix. I use a shortening cutter to mix the lard finely into the mix so that it becomes invisible. I have used bannock mix that is over a year old.

I don't mix milk powder in mine, since I am lactose intolerant. I mix up batches of bannock mix at home, then bag to whatever portions I want. Everyone's bannock mix seems to be different. It also matters if you are going to dry bake or wet fry. I don't really think wet frying is real bannock - its a pancake. Dry baking has two basic forms: (1) wetter batter and un-kneaded. This will come out cakey or like a muffin or biscuit type crumbly consistency; or (2) dry bread dough style and kneaded to produce the elastic and rubbery dough of classic bread type of dough. This will come out with more of a bread consistency, heavier and less crumbly. I prefer this style, but its more work in the kneading, and you need a kneading surface - I use the now extinct (unless you can find it) round flat bottomed plastic wash basin that just fits into the mouth of a 60L barrel. These are excellent if you can find one.

Here is my home mix quantities:

6 cups whole wheat flour
2 tablespoons baking powder
2 tablespoons egg powder
2 teaspoons brown sugar
3/4 cup lard.

I don't add salt, even though every recipe seems to call for it. I get enough sodium from the baking powder and other foods, I don't need more.

Mix up the dry ingredients first with the shortening cutter. Then slice up the lard into small bits and cut in with the shortening cutter. It will glob up anyway, and it takes a while to cut it back down to invisibility in the mix. I would guess there are some electric kitchen gadget mixers that make this much easier, but I don't have them.

Then bag into a double layer of freezer grade zip-locks to the portion of your choice.

NOTE: If you are going to do the the dry bake kneading style at camp, you need to hold back lots of dry mix to dry up you dough. e.g. I take 4 cups of mix in a bag. I mix up 3 of those cups with water into just barely wet enough to wet out the dough so it does not stick to the spoon (much). Then I add the remaining cup of mix and get both hands into to knead it into bannock bread dough. It should be dry enough to clean the dough off your hands and the basin. Then spread into your pan. It should be so elastic as to want to spring back up when you pat it down to spread into the pan. It will bake up nicely into a dense hardy loaf of bannock if you cover you pan to make an oven.

Here is a cross section of my dry baked, kneaded bannock. I make an 8 inch pan of this that lasts me about 5 days of lunches:
Image

Or you can mix it wetter in a container without the kneading and bake it like a muffin or biscuit.

Good luck!

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PostPosted: July 28th, 2012, 11:04 am 
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I've eaten quite a bit of bannock, and never heard of lard being mixed in. We use the lard to fry the bannock in.


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PostPosted: July 29th, 2012, 2:45 pm 
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Once my mix is ready, do I just keep it in a ziploc? Or should I endeavour to to keep it in a more airtight container?

Thanks for the tips!


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PostPosted: July 29th, 2012, 5:02 pm 
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bimber wrote:
Once my mix is ready, do I just keep it in a ziploc? Or should I endeavour to to keep it in a more airtight container?

Thanks for the tips!
I double bag in freezer weight ziplocs. Until I am ready to take my bannock mix on a trip, I keep it in the freezer, just to be extra safe. But I have kept it at room temperature for months with no problem. I do use solid vegetable shortening (Crisco), but lard is more traditional.

For milk I use Nido. It is powdered whole milk, not non-fat. Much better.
http://www.nestlenido.com/AllAboutNido/Default.aspx
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Nido-Instant- ... b/14869811


Last edited by nessmuk on August 1st, 2012, 4:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: August 1st, 2012, 9:41 am 
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Location: Winnipeg
Sure, just mix it all up and take it with you. I make mine without milk for the bush but do use it at home. In the past I have taken the mix dry and simply added some oil to a batch when I want to cook it.
I just use my non stick frying pan with a pot over top to make a sort of oven effect and that seems to do well. There is nothing like some warm bannock and jam to make a nice pickmeup snack. Goes good with stews and chili too. If you boil some raisins and then use the water and raisins to mix the flour you can have tasty raisin scones that make good trail food.

...Christine


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PostPosted: August 2nd, 2012, 8:17 pm 
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My mix may not be as good as all of these but I like it, its versatile and since you say you have never made it its super easy.

To make a 12" circle 3/4" thick (roughly) Use one cup of flour one teaspoon baking powder and a teaspoon salt (the proportions aren't actually that important). Mix with water when your ready to cook adding a little at a time until its the consistancy of play-doh or so (not sticky) and the key here go slow with the water and mix well until you are good at it.

I fry it in oil or cook it classic style over a fire. (using a grill is so easy or propped up on sticks beside the fire).

After you have a success get creative. A spoon of sugar and some berries in the morning, vindaloo in the evening.

Mixing and cooking takes me about 5 min so Its no trouble.

What ever recipe you choose good luck :)


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PostPosted: August 7th, 2012, 1:22 pm 
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RHaslam wrote:
I've eaten quite a bit of bannock, and never heard of lard being mixed in. We use the lard to fry the bannock in.


I was thinking the same. There's no oil/butter in my recipe. I just use a bit of Ghee to grease the pan before cooking.


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PostPosted: August 25th, 2013, 7:50 pm 
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Most bannock ...tea biscuit mix if you will.... is made with shortening, or lard as we mostly know it. You can use whatever, lard, oil, margarine or nothing apparently. I suspect the traditional method using lard is to provide some fat into the diet which is important in the cold weather.
Bottom line...its good stuff and pretty easy to pack along. I usually keep my mix dry and add the lard before I mix it. That way I can use the flour mix for pancakes, fish battering etc in case I run out of other stuff.

Christy


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PostPosted: August 26th, 2013, 9:29 am 
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Location: Lethbridge, Alberta Canada
never used lard either. I keep it simple like Dimitri except add 3 tbs of powdered milk and only 1/2 tsp salt


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PostPosted: September 5th, 2013, 12:47 pm 
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I do the same as Dimitri keep it as simple as possible. I usually mix up enough for the trip and store in a ziplock. To make a dessert style i tried adding hazelnut coffee whitener and it turned out great. It might be a plain but its all about what you add to it at camp. My cheese stuffed bannock balls were a hit, you can make calzone/panzarotti style stuffed bannock for a different take on pizza.


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PostPosted: September 6th, 2013, 8:28 pm 
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I took out a group with a vegetarian diet this summer and fried my bannock mix in Olive Oil ...best bannock to-date, so much nicer than lard. I mixed the dry ingredients at home and stored in zip lock baggies, brought skim milk powder to make into liquid to form the dough, and the olive oil in a nalgene container.

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PostPosted: December 8th, 2013, 4:26 pm 
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I grew up with me ole gran making tea biscuits and scones, not knowing that is what bannock is. Later in life I became part of a native family and was shown how that particular family made bannock. Coogum always used lard right in the mix, she even wiped it down with some while still hot. Others would deep fry it instead, or do both. It was simply for calories and such, for the guys out working hard in the bush. Of course they used to eat lard instead of butter or margarine too. I never did get used to that one. For sure the lard makes it a heavy duty proposition that sticks with you...lol. Throw in some sliced Klik and you are in business.

Now if you look further back in history, you will find bannock to be a scottish concoction that was often referred to as army bread. No yeast.It was adopted by the natives when the HBC showed up on the scene with a thousand or so scotsmen in charge.

No matter what you call it, it can be a nice break and fill you up when rations are scarce. I am thinking that a pack or two of yeast and the time to bake some real bread might be a chore worth tackling this year.

Christy


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