View topic - Repairing old snowshoes

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PostPosted: January 22nd, 2003, 1:01 pm 
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Joined: January 25th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 311
Location: Revelstoke, British Columbia canada
Electricians or a simular tape works well.if you have your grips preset you can also use them when you first pull the wood out.
Good straight grained ash will be quite pliable when you flex it.Long skinny pieces like snowshoe frames will sometimes be droopy,you will be able to tell.Its always good to have a centre line drawn at the mid point.I will rehearse the steps that I have to go through to put the wood on the frame ...like a dry run.This way when you pull out the steamed wood you have no wasted time and all is a smooth fluid motion.Kinda like when you see rock climbers going through the moves they need to carry out on a pitch. If you steam too long the wood gets cooked and becomes brittle I think its the lingnum or something such.Too long isnt good.When steaming Yellow cedar ribstock for w/c canoes we only steam around 12 minutes and have great success-once we caught onto the timing. Years ago I made snowshoes out of homemade babiche, quite a chore.Ive seen snowshoes made with poly rope the yellow stuff that seemed to work well.Good luck on your project and remember always over first when stringing your frames-youll see


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: dboles on 2003-01-22 13:44 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: dboles on 2003-01-22 13:46 ]</font>


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PostPosted: January 26th, 2003, 2:08 pm 
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Joined: July 15th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1399
Location: Big Flats, New York USA
If several more attempts the past two days I think I am getting better. Changes I have made which seem to help:

- Soaking the wood; 12 hours helped some, 20 hours was much better. I have a couple more pieces soaking which I will leave in the creek for a few more days at least.

- Bending slowly. I think part of my problems have come from not taking my time when putting the wood on the form. The wood yields, but at its own rate. Part of that experienced feel I guess.

- I've also used small brads to tack the metal shims in place before placing in the steamer. This allows me to start bending almost immediately upon removel from the steamer.

I now have one nearly perfect snowshoe frame, and several others which might be usable with some epoxy work. Fortunately, I have plenty of ash to keep working at it.

Tony


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PostPosted: January 26th, 2003, 2:49 pm 
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Joined: January 25th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Revelstoke, British Columbia canada
Forgot to mention its always good to have the tenons done while the piece is still flat.Your likely doing that


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PostPosted: January 27th, 2003, 8:32 am 
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Joined: July 15th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Big Flats, New York USA
The tenons or mortices?

I have the material cut* for the crossbars, but they still need to be shaped. The instructions I'm using say to mark the mortice locations while on the forming frame then cut after removal. Cutting after shaping looks to be slightly tricky. How would you know where to cut before bending?

Tony

* I split 1x2.25" stock on my circular saw to get the cross bars. This was definately a dangerous operation, I had one piece kickback, fly over my shoulder and land about 30' away. I made jig after that, but it is time to get a bandsaw.


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PostPosted: January 27th, 2003, 12:54 pm 
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Joined: January 25th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Revelstoke, British Columbia canada
Either way works Its not a big deal to cut them out.On your next set you will know where they need to be,and are easier to work when the frames are flat.My experience is limited to only a few pairs,you are catching up fast.The study of snowshoes is amazing not only did different peoples have different frame types for different snow conditions they also used different aniamals hides for webbing for snow conditions.I have seen beaver used for powder snow,the weaving was really fine and the babiche narrow. Beautiful snowshoes they were!They also never had a good water barrier like varnish,any fats or oils wouldnt work so they used to make a strong tea of alder bark and paint the webbing.I tried it but it works best in cold dry conditions.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: dboles on 2003-01-27 13:07 ]</font>


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