View topic - Book Recommendations - Holiday Reading 2009





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PostPosted: December 7th, 2009, 12:52 pm 
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Anybody have any good book recommendations? I'm listening to a local radio program featuring the author of "Great Waters," and it sounds really incredible to me. I thought I would pass it along, as well as a second book that is on my list. I've been watching the PBS series on the National Parks (Ken Burns), and the story of Theodore Roosevelt really stood out to me. There was a lot that I did not know about the Parks in the States, particularly the hard fought battles and the power of individuals and local citizen groups. Roosevelt towers as a legend in the early efforts to communicate and protect threatened lands.

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From Booklist: This may be the first full scale biography of an ocean. Deborah Cramer, a Massachusetts science writer, shows us the Atlantic Ocean in a way we’ve never seen it before: as an inhabitant of planet Earth, as a living entity that will, perhaps sooner than we expect, grow old and die. Atlantic (not “the Atlantic,” since Cramer refers to the ocean as though it were a person) isn’t merely a lot of water with stuff in it; it’s an ecosystem, a fragile entity that depends on us as much as we depend on it. Humanity’s shipping lanes flow right through whale feeding grounds; we feed ourselves at the expense of Atlantic’s own residents. This book vividly illustrates the nature of “the giveandtake between land and sea” and reminds us just how brutal we can sometimes be to this ocean we often take too much for granted. Fans of the writings of Rachel Carson, Peter Matthiessen, and Farley Mowat–all of whom speak passionately about humanity’s role in the world’s ecosystems–will certainly want to read this provocative work of popular science.

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From Times Review: It is hard to believe today that there was a time when securing Pelican Island, Yosemite and the Grand Canyon were controversial decisions denounced as a federal land grab inimical to states’ rights and economic growth. Of course every generation has its own idea of progress, beauty and necessity. What made Theodore Roosevelt a conservationist hero was his conviction that pelicans, 2,000-year-old redwood trees and ancient rock formations belonged to future generations of Americans as well as to the past. Weighed against eternity, what were the arguments of mining magnates, plume hunters, local businesses and assorted congressmen? From the time he became president, in 1901, until he left office 100 years ago, Roosevelt saved over 234 million acres of wild America. How a city-born child of privilege became one of the greatest forces in American conservation is the subject of Douglas Brinkley’s vast, inspiring and enormously entertaining book, “The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America.” The subtitle is telling — the crusade for America, not “wild America” — because for Roosevelt, living forests and petrified forests, bird preserves and buffalo ranges were essential for the country’s survival as a moral and military power.


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PostPosted: December 7th, 2009, 4:36 pm 
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
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A HANDBOOK OF BIOTIC FOREST COMMUNITIES OF ONTARIO

Norman and Norma Martin. Identifies and describes the 10 principal forest types in Ontario, including their main plants and animals. Discusses forest succession, including coverage of fire, old growth, and conservation of forest types.


I have not read it, this is probably more of a nature guide type book that can be applied to walks through the woods. The authors spent over 50 years studying Ontario forests and it has recently been reprinted in a 4th edition.

It doesn't seem to be available at Amazon... anybody wanting the new 4th edition may be able to get it here:


A Handbook of Biotic Forest Communities of Ontario

Commonwealth Research,
1107-2 South Front St.,
Belleville, ON, K8N 5K7

$15 plus $3 postage handling.


Description:

http://www.northumberlandtoday.com/Arti ... ?e=2195713

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PostPosted: December 7th, 2009, 7:08 pm 
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
I just picked up a copy of The Arctic Year(by Peter Freuchen and Finn Salomonson) for a buck.

Published in 1958 it is a description of human and plant and animal activity month to month.

So far it is fascinating. I believe I will hand it down to my grandkids with stipulation they hand it down to their grandkids, so they can compare in the year 2100.


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PostPosted: December 8th, 2009, 1:14 pm 
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Joined: August 6th, 2007, 10:05 am
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Location: Hamilton, Ontario, CANADA
I am currently enjoying;
Voyage of the Ant by James Dina
"A true story of ingenuity and perserverance,...
of building a birchbark canoe with stone tools and paddling up (!) the Connecticut River to rediscover the lost world of the Indians"
1989

[I noticed some of the used book dealers have this incorrectly list as by James DIN]


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PostPosted: December 8th, 2009, 2:48 pm 
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Joined: December 30th, 2003, 11:36 pm
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Location: Kitchener Ontario
Rob Stevens wrote:
I am currently enjoying;
Voyage of the Ant by James Dina
"A true story of ingenuity and perserverance,...
of building a birchbark canoe with stone tools and paddling up (!) the Connecticut River to rediscover the lost world of the Indians"
1989

[I noticed some of the used book dealers have this incorrectly list as by James DIN]


I've read this...good read! Interesting "native" bug repelent used...IIRC it was something to do with onions. Seemed to work...can anyone here who has read the book remember what it was ?????

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"The way of a canoe is the way of the wilderness, and of a freedom almost forgotten." Sigurd Olson, 1956


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PostPosted: December 17th, 2009, 6:55 pm 
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Location: Boise, ID
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Came upon this today ... an exceptional collection, by Theodore Cross (who's 83 and started photographing birds mid-life). And it's a photo book, if you're still looking for a gift.

NPR Interview with Cross:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... =121480844

Direct link to audio:

http://public.npr.org/anon.npr-mp3/npr/ ... atc_16.mp3


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