View topic - Need new lunch for long trips:

It is currently October 26th, 2020, 2:24 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 108 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 8  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 9th, 2005, 11:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: November 10th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 370
Location: Whitehorse, Yukon Canada
Sometimes on long trips I take “Transform” (a protein supplement for after a workout at the gym). One scoop in a flask of water... Vibrant Vanilla flavour tastes pretty darn good. Along with that I will eat either a homemade protein/granola bar or a store bought one. That and an apple is good for me for lunch. I get all the nutrients required and I'm full.

I also take “Greens Plus” in the morning... this is equal to five full servings of vegetables.

I also make bannock and have added garlic & parmesan cheese, cinnamon, raisins and pecans or spices such as cardamon... these taste great with jam.

Other times I will make extra breakfast and pack it with me for my lunch in a flask.

There are lots of great ideas out there and I am interested in hearing more.

Dianne

_________________
Dianne
www.ravenink.ca


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 9th, 2005, 11:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: November 10th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 370
Location: Whitehorse, Yukon Canada
I forgot to add to my previous post... sometimes I take smoked dried fish with me. It's called innakaga (I don't know how to spell this word, but that is how it is pronounced.) It's a Tahltan word. Anyway, the fish lasts for a long time and is a good source of protein and is very delicious. I used to go with my family to fish camp on the Stikine River and that is where I learned to dry, smoke and can fish. To make it, you fillet the fish into thin strips (remove the skin) and you hang it to dry in a well ventilated smoke house (these are easy to make using green alder poles). Using young green alder for your fire, you keep the fire smoldering/smoking for 24-48 hours until your fish is completely dry. Store in a cool dry place in a bag.

Dianne

_________________
Dianne
www.ravenink.ca


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 10th, 2005, 9:07 am 
Offline

Joined: June 25th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
We use to eat smoke dried haddock a fair amount as kids. My mom's side of the family are all Newfies so I've had cod and Haddock just about any way possible. Grandma called it Fin & Haddie, cooked it up in an egg sauce. Fish & brews (dried cod soaked out and boiled/with hard tack) were mentioned in a Kanawa article some time back. Good for making fish cakes if you have any leftovers. Wouldn't taste the same to me without salt pork. Smoked dried caplin make a nice snack, I guess up this way you'd have to use smelt or whitefish. Yummy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 10th, 2005, 5:16 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 5699
Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
Gail R wrote:
We use to eat smoke dried haddock a fair amount as kids. My mom's side of the family are all Newfies so I've had cod and Haddock just about any way possible. Grandma called it Fin & Haddie, cooked it up in an egg sauce. Smoked dried caplin make a nice snack, I guess up this way you'd have to use smelt or whitefish. Yummy.


Make that Finnian Haddie(ock) Gail :)

Smoked dried caplin make a nice snack: Accept no substitutes! ( now there's one way............with water for chasers after the salty caplin.....to ensure you have to get up at night and stand (or squat, as the case may be) and look at the stars for awhile!

maybe one of these to get a better view of the stars!? :oops:

Image

_________________

Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 11th, 2005, 10:17 am 
Offline

Joined: August 7th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 117
Location: Duluth, MN
I know this doesn't satisfy your no fire requirement, but we eat bannock with soup about every other day. A months worth of soup packs down to nothing at all, and with a stove only takes a few minutes to make. Although I understand on the tundra you don't neccessarily want to get out of the canoe for fear of being eaten alive by bugs! There are so many varieties of soup that it never gets old, although if you plan about half soup lunches and half of the lunches I've described below, you can end up being annoyed if it is really hot or you are putting in very long days and don't want to stop to make soup.
The other days we eat cliff bars, a handfull of trail mix, those rye vita (sp) crackers with pb and honey, and a slice or two of cheese. Although it is more packaging, we take individually wrapped cheese slices for lunch, and they seem to hold up very well. I think one of the things that makes cheese go bad is contact with dirty hands and exposure to air. I lay a slice of cheese on top of my steaming bannock, it is like a little pizza...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 11th, 2005, 1:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: June 25th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
A good thermos for one wouldn't take that much space and you could store stuff in it until you got sick of the PB and then use it to put your soup in till lunchtime? It would really expand your lunch possibilities
Wotrock you old fart, had to get that picture in again eh :lol: :lol:
It's fiinian? guess I diddn't listen too much as a kid. First time I had smoked Kaplin was visiting my uncle in St Anthony, I thought it was good but I like salt and vinegar chips too so maybe they are salty????


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 11th, 2005, 7:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 7th, 2003, 1:13 pm
Posts: 21
Location: London, Ontario
Hoop,

I'd like to second (or third) the No cook Ramen Salad. I initially found the recipe on this site and was leary (I thought it sounded weird). But now it is my favorite lunch of all. It is very light as everything is dehydrated except for the salad dressing, of which you need very little per portion. I pack a single Ramen per person (without the soup base) in a ziplock bag and add some dehydrated carrots, green peas, and corn. Seperately I take along some parmesan and bacon bits (the fake soy stuff is good too), and the dressing (just oil, vinigar, salt, pepper and oregano). In the morning before you set off put the ramen noodles and veggies in a nalgene and just cover with water. When you want your lunch pour off the liquid and add your dressing and toppings and you have a really delicious, and very filling lunch. If your travelling with a partner, one nalgene easily holds two Ramen lunches (maybe more, I haven't tried).

About the peanut butter. I have always used the natural stuff and have never refrigerated it. It may not last quite as long as the other stuff but it does last plenty long. I'm still working on a jar I bought over a month ago and there is still no sign of rancidity.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 18th, 2005, 11:52 am 
Offline

Joined: February 18th, 2005, 9:28 am
Posts: 57
Location: Toronto
Smoked meats won't last a month. What you need and I take every solo trip I do is cured meats. They taste great, still a good amount of fat and of course meat protien. Cured meats will last a month in warm weather. Smoke will spoil rather quickly in the heat.

You can get all sors of meats cured, but they are a little more expensive. well worth it. Great for lunch and to add to dinners.

You can also get extra dry cheese that will last a month as well. But they have to be VERY dry.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 18th, 2005, 12:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 7514
Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
Algonquin wrote:
Smoked meats won't last a month. What you need and I take every solo trip I do is cured meats.

You are pointing out an important difference. I know it under a different name: (just)smoked vs cold-smoked. I don't really want to go into the details (I have never done any smoking for food preservation myself so I am not qualified) but for folks like myself, I just see whether the butcher keeps the ware in the cooler or out in the open, unrefrigerated. It's the latter that you want, and it will be "cured".


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 21st, 2005, 12:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 18th, 2005, 9:28 am
Posts: 57
Location: Toronto
I'm no expert either, but the owner of the place where I buy my stuff told me that not all the meats that can stay out of a fridge are cured. The difference being that at room temps they are fine, but uncured meats in in warm summer temps may spoil.

If he is right, don't just assume that the meat is cured if it is not in a fridge. But again, I am no expert either. All I know is that they sure taste good.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 23rd, 2005, 7:23 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3145
Greg Allen wrote:
I found "Pilot Bisquits" a god send last summer. They are sweetish and keep pretty good. Also they are available in the bush stores along the Mackenzie - where I go. I have tried to find them in the states to no avail.

Nabisco was going to stop making Pilot Crackers a few years ago but there was mutiny in New England. We have come to depend on them as an accompaniment to fish and lobster chowder. Hence they are still available here, but not in New Mexico. They hold up very well under humid conditions and dont crumble so they are a staple on fishing boats.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 23rd, 2005, 11:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1879
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
I knew the pilot biscuit recommendation would come up when I posted this topic.

I found 2 makes of pilot biscuits in the grocery store in Fort Smith, NWT last summer. I bought some for my Thelon trip, but I was somwhat under-whelmed. They are made with white flour, and I like whole wheat stuff. I just found them a little bland, and I am not confident about their nutritional benefits for long trips, due to the highly refined "white flour", not enriched according to the label.

One make is very, very hard and dense. Bite with caution: "McCormick’s Pilot Biscuits". These have no shortening or yeast, which explains their hardness. The other make is lighter and more like a big cracker, easier on the teeth: "Flaky Pilot Biscuits". These have shortening and yeast, but unfortunately also milk (whey).

Both are made by Beta Brands in London, Ontario.
If anyone has more insight into the nutritional value of these brands, that would be great.

Are the pilot biscuits in Maine available in whole wheat? Are they a little easier on the teeth? What is their manufacturer?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 24th, 2005, 2:49 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: April 4th, 2004, 3:17 am
Posts: 247
Location: Jämtland, Sweden
HOOP_ wrote:
They are made with white flour, and I like whole wheat stuff. I just found them a little bland, and I am not confident about their nutritional benefits for long trips, due to the highly refined "white flour", not enriched according to the label.

One make is very, very hard and dense. Bite with caution: "McCormick’s Pilot Biscuits". These have no shortening or yeast, which explains their hardness. The other make is lighter and more like a big cracker, easier on the teeth: "Flaky Pilot Biscuits". These have shortening and yeast, but unfortunately also milk (whey).


Not having seen a list of ingredients with proportions there is no way to answer the qyestion in anything like detail. But...

Nutritional value can be seen as two somewhat separate questions. One is "how much energy ove how long time dies this give me", and the other is "does this give me a properly balanced nutrition, including trace elements, vitaminst, etc". White flour is so-so for question one, but not so good for question two. On the other hand sugar is abysmal for both questions, since it only gives you short term energy.

I suspect that the real original reason for the white flour is that it does not contain as much fat as the whole stuff, and thus will not go rancid, as well as the "tasts great" effect.

I have -- but have never tried! -- a recipie for a hard tack designed by the Swedish army around 1700 (the king involved in the adoption ruled 1697 - 1718). Take 2 litre of sourdoug starter and water. Add 3 kg coarse rye flour, mix into a rather dry dough, and let rise for 16 hours. Shape into a square loaf a handswidth high. Bake at 100 C for 6 hours. Let rest in a cool place for 8 days. Cut in 2 cm cubes and dry. Soak 5-7 minutes before eating.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 24th, 2005, 11:12 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 22nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1878
Try this recipe - works for me.

1/2 cup wheat germ
2 cups fine-grind corn meal
1/2 cup quick-cooking oatmeal
2 cups white flour
1 tbs sugar
1 tbs seasoned salt (for spicey try a few shakes of onion flakes)
1/8 cup Sesame Seeds or broken pumpkin seeds
1 3/4 cup water

everything in a bowl and mix with your hands.
use parchment paper not oil to line two cookie sheets
separate into 4 equal parts - 2 parts to each cookie sheet.
roll to 1/4inch thick
score deep with a knife into biscuit sizes before cooking
bake about 350 for half an hour.
after cooling break into biscuits.
I vaccuum pack into packs of 4 to 6 biscuits

cheers, Ted


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 24th, 2005, 11:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: February 24th, 2005, 1:15 pm
Posts: 290
maddogbob wrote:
One of our favourites is hummus. IMHO it is an excellent alternative to Peanut Butter. It is simple to make, nutritious and dehyrates/rehydrates easily - especially if you put through the blender after it is dried. It tastes good on anything bread or cracker-like.

For variety, you can mix it with salsa, another healthy food that dehydrates easily.

It's one of our staples.

Bob
I've seen ideas of hummus and tuna posted separately here. Try them together! I use the foil pouch tuna which takes up minimal space and has minimal packaging waste. You can make and dry your own hummus, or buy it already dried (Fantastic Foods is one brand). It is best made with water and a small amount of olive oil which I carry in a tiny nalgene bottle. Make a tuna sandwich with flatbread, a tortilla, or hardtack. Make edible hardtack by using a basic recipe and add a tiny amount of baking powder to the mix. It is no longer a purist's hardtack, but it becomes edible. I also make it with oat flour.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 108 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 8  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group