View topic - Older trippers - How to get out there and enjoy it.

It is currently November 21st, 2019, 4:23 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 76 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: December 18th, 2016, 5:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3016
Location: Milton
Well this thread could go in a bunch of directions.... 8)

But since some of my trips are with "older" paddlers and being a proud member of the group I had been thinking of ways to bring this subject up.
(my Spring QEW trips fit right into this groups age group)

Not only for thought for some seasoned paddlers, but also some (older aged) newbies you may want to coerce into going for a trip because you may have been friends a long time.

So the article is from Canoe/Kayak Magazine.

http://www.canoekayak.com/travel/takeaw ... WG0LG45.97

I like the idea of using a water taxi type service for a base camp as I get older, and especially since I have a few friends with heart conditions that still want to get out there, and should my health go south, a way to help get me out there.

The Spiritual component, yeah more so ever since I turned 50, I look at my trips and what I find in a much different light, but that is a very personal thing and everyone sees things differently.

On the "don't overdo" not so much on the gear for me but don't overdo the effort while on a trip.

On the Training thing.... super important! It is the difference of enjoying the trip to one where you are tested because you are not ready.
Over a year into retirement and I have paddle about 3,000 k's this year and hiked about 2000. Most of which was in the training.
(including a every other day a 700m portage through the neighbourhood.)

I also played hockey 1 a week in the spring/summer and 2/3 times a week in fall/winter.
Which I agree is a little much for many people.
But it did make my paddling and hiking trips that much more enjoyable.

Which made living in the moment of the trip even more enjoyable, from the snow and cold on the spring trip, to the cold wet rain on my fall trip.

So I thought this was timely way to get a discussion going to encourage some off season dreaming about a possible trip next year.

Just like boats/paddles prepping for a trip is a personal thing and any tips to get you out there is a personal choice, especially since we all have different "issues"

So I hope we can help get some people out there, no matter what type of trip you choose.

Jeff

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 18th, 2016, 8:26 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 5541
Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
jedi jeffi wrote:
Well this thread could go in a bunch of directions.... 8)

But since some of my trips are with "older" paddlers and being a proud member of the group I had been thinking of ways to bring this subject up.
(my Spring QEW trips fit right into this groups age group)

Really? Seniors do QE trips. I thought it was tough slogging up there. Sign me up!! :)


Jeff

_________________

Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 19th, 2016, 7:43 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: January 27th, 2009, 7:44 am
Posts: 989
Location: Ontario
Well, I'm 70, so I guess I can say something on this. :roll:

I have found that 2 things have changed in what I do and how I do them over the last 10 years or so: first, weight and bulk have become everything (almost) - I have acquired as much ultra-light gear as I can - Kevlar/clear coat canoe, take-down shock-corded titanium poles, titanium tent pegs, super light siltarp, etc. And, I bring WAY less gear than I did a while back. Essentials only.

Second, I have become far more conservative (read 'cautious') about the routes I pick, especially those with significant carries. There are routes I just don't do anymore because I know that some of the carries will be too much of a grind nowadays.

Still gettin' out there, though! :)

_________________
In the Spring, I have counted 136 different kinds of weather inside of 24 hours.
Mark Twain


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 19th, 2016, 9:27 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 5th, 2013, 6:48 am
Posts: 168
A few weeks ago my Pak canoe 165 was delivered. This will allow me to be dropped into the good stuff with reasonable float plane costs. Otherwise a week is spent getting to new country to explore. As the years climb from the present 65 I relish the thought of having this option to get out there.

_________________
http://www.youtube.com/user/TheNorthwoodsman1


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 19th, 2016, 9:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8936
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
Training? That will be a cold day in he**

We have a trip coming up in six weeks.. No I am not doing portages but training is out of the question.. Right now the goal is to walk properly after a total knee replacement in October.. Healing now.. Training much later..

I cant walk with a load nor bike normally.. But we will do a no portage paddling trip. We is the operative word here. Big water is kind to seniors.

Its possible to train for canoeing ...by canoeing easier trips and building up stamina.

The challenge is getting off the ground.. I am not supposed to kneel for several months as the implants arent healed fully.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 19th, 2016, 10:19 am 
Offline

Joined: October 31st, 2016, 9:32 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Missoula, Montana
One problem with getting older is that your friends quit doing outdoor activities and/or die. In past years I had a large group of friends and contacts I went on multi-day kayak trips with, and we would do five or six multi-day kayak trips a year, while employed. But one by one they have disappeared due to various physical ailments, developing new interests, or becoming less interested in running big whitewater. I can sympathize with the latter, as I find myself becoming less of a whitewater junky and quite happy to splash through Class III water and to go kayak fishing. One reason I have joined this forum is in hopes of making connections with people who like to do long river trips.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 19th, 2016, 2:45 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 30th, 2006, 1:31 pm
Posts: 405
Location: Hamilton ON
Interesting topic and one I have thought about a lot. Each spring when I successfully lift the canoe for the first time, I rejoice. One more year!
The two of us are approaching our joint 150th birthday- just like Canada. (both turning 75).
As a young guy I often wondered why old people behaved the way they do- walk hunched over, lose their balance, stumble, have trouble reading instructions in fine print, take naps, stop doing sports that they have done all their life, forget what they are doing etc.
As an old guy I have been amusing myself by discovering the answers.
Our trips have always been flat water in lake country. Although we take a yearly family trip with the kids and grandkids, most of our trips have just been the two of us. Although we miss having the young sherpas with us when we are alone, we have found that in some ways it is easier on old guys when we are alone. We plan trips that we are comfortable with. The trips are shorter in time and distance but so far not easier physically. Yes physical training is very important and safety too.
More later.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 19th, 2016, 2:58 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3016
Location: Milton
Littlered what you are doing is training!
We are all restricted to what our bodies can let us do.
I do plan to gear down just a bit... well maybe.... depends where I end up going.
pmmpete there are still a few "older" paddlers around that still want to get out, abet in more favourable conditons for those longer river type runs.
As always it is getting schedules to synch.
There is a group of us on facebook if you are in Ontario.
Called "old lazy paddlers"
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1215371221816222/
and no there still hasn't been a meet up.... :roll:
but I have paddled with a few.

The trick will be to keep getting out.
Jeff

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 20th, 2016, 9:55 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 30th, 2006, 1:31 pm
Posts: 405
Location: Hamilton ON
As we get older we have found that it is necessary to reduce the weight of our packs every year. We try to get around the inescapable fact that we are getting weaker by carrying less. Sue keeps very detailed records of what we take (clothes, equipment and food) and what we use. We don't compromise on our safety but there are lots of little things that we used to carry that we found we could do without.
We have records of how much food we have used in the past so rather than take a big bag of oatmeal, we weigh out serving sizes. This is not to say that we eat less. We try to come home with only the food that has been assigned as an emergency extra day. It is really easy to save kilograms of extra weight this way.
Try this on your next trip. Weigh all your food ahead of the trip and then weigh it again when you return home. What is the difference? It may surprize you.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 20th, 2016, 12:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8936
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
Pretty soon we will all be tripping naked and starving.. :rofl:

We have on this years plate a Trans Canada trip with a canoe trip down that most senior citizen friendly river the Yukon

And in Florida.. the Everglades, St John and Big Bend Saltwater Paddling trail( last one some 170 km of no people)

Note the commonality.. no portages ( unless we FU the tide tables in FL).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 20th, 2016, 4:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 9th, 2005, 10:27 pm
Posts: 68
SNIP: Pretty soon we will all be tripping naked and starving.. :rofl:
Hahahaha! PMP!!

Ultra light gear for sure.

Leapfrogging multiple loads on portages so that each carry doesn't exceed 400 to 500 meters (or whatever amount you predetermine) depending on conditions is a bit slower but much less painfull and still gets you across long portages.

Take tiny steps on the climbs. Slower but less strenuous.

Staying comfortable: good raingear, good tent, good tarp (or two, depending on time of year), good sleeping bag, nice! pillow, good sleeping pad, chair kit for sleeping pad!!! (all compact and lightweight).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 20th, 2016, 5:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 31st, 2016, 9:32 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Missoula, Montana
As I get older, I need a cushier sleeping pad. For many years I used a 1.5 inch thick Thermarest pad. Then I found that after three or four nights of camping, the sides of my hips would get sore, and I would be flipping over and over at night trying to get comfortable. So I changed to a 2 inch Thermarest pad, which worked fine for many years. But eventually I again found that after three or four nights of camping, the sides of my hips would get sore. So I changed to an air mattress about 3 inches thick, which is currently working fine. If the air mattress becomes inadequate, I'm not sure what the next sleeping solution will be.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 20th, 2016, 5:22 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8936
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
Pile the Thermarests under it!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 20th, 2016, 5:45 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3469
Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
pmmpete wrote:
As I get older, I need a cushier sleeping pad. For many years I used a 1.5 inch thick Thermarest pad. Then I found that after three or four nights of camping, the sides of my hips would get sore, and I would be flipping over and over at night trying to get comfortable. So I changed to a 2 inch Thermarest pad, which worked fine for many years. But eventually I again found that after three or four nights of camping, the sides of my hips would get sore. So I changed to an air mattress about 3 inches thick, which is currently working fine. If the air mattress becomes inadequate, I'm not sure what the next sleeping solution will be.


I started out with the original copper coloured Thermarests, about 25 years ago I switched to the original Camprest pad which was sufficient for many years but eventually (like you) found it lacking especially on lumpy surfaces. Last year I moved up to the Mondoking, a 4" Thermarest....what luxury! Gravel bars.....no problem, tree roots.....no problem, cold ground....no problem, getting up in the morning.....definitely a problem!

My only regret was not getting the 3D version which maintains the 4" thickness even along the edges. The one issue with the Mondoking is that it's very slow to self inflate and of course it takes up a lot of space even when rolled up.

_________________
"What else could I do? I had no trade so I became a peddler" - Lazarus Greenberg 1915


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 20th, 2016, 7:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 31st, 2016, 9:32 pm
Posts: 100
Location: Missoula, Montana
recped wrote:
I started out with the original copper coloured Thermarests, about 25 years ago I switched to the original Camprest pad which was sufficient for many years but eventually (like you) found it lacking especially on lumpy surfaces. Last year I moved up to the Mondoking, a 4" Thermarest....what luxury! Gravel bars.....no problem, tree roots.....no problem, cold ground....no problem, getting up in the morning.....definitely a problem!

My only regret was not getting the 3D version which maintains the 4" thickness even along the edges. The one issue with the Mondoking is that it's very slow to self inflate and of course it takes up a lot of space even when rolled up.


Wow! I didn't know that Thermarest makes a four inch thick sleeping pad. That's monstrous. I have a three inch thick Thermarest which I use for winter camping, but it would take up way too much room in a whitewater kayak. An advantage of air mattresses is that they don't take up very much space.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 76 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group